Pete Phillips

Need split rim tire changing instruction

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1929 Chrysler model 65 coupe. I need to change the inner tube. What tool am I missing to get this rim lock undone? Never done this before, so I need some instruction, please.

Thanks for any help.

Pete Phillips

Leonard, Texas

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DO NOT USE the rim spreader. Do this instead. Get the correct tool and do it this way....put the flat end of the wrench into the slot and crank the tab towards the center. Do just the opposite when reassembling. You will only ruin the rim band with that rim spreader. The correct tool will open the rim band just enough to not warp it.

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Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Oh....you will have to spin the tube a little bit past the air valve hole as when you return it to it's original position, it will shift a bit. Make sure you have the tube/valve core out of the valve so the tube is really pliable and no air keeps it from deflating all of the way. It will be a tight fit with your fingers to get the tube just right. BE CERTAIN THE RIM BAND UNDER THE TUBE IS CLEAN.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Hopefully, you have not already put too much cranking pressure on the rim with that spreader. If it ends up being warped from the spreader, be certain you put it back to "round" prior to reassembly.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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If you need a better explanation or more help call me.

John 541.535.1890

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The rim spreader is placed wrong if you need to use it. Go to model A tire changes on You-tube . Also be careful; filling make sure lock is tight before bouncing to set tube in rim .

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Keiser,

                I'm not at all familiar with this type of rim, just curious. If one doesn't have the tool you posted could a half inch flex bar be used or is the hole not square?

Greg

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1 hour ago, GregLaR said:

Keiser,

                I'm not at all familiar with this type of rim, just curious. If one doesn't have the tool you posted could a half inch flex bar be used or is the hole not square?

Greg

FHBB12.jpg

It is not a square hole. I have used a huge screwdriver to turn them, but it is VERY difficult without the offset in the wrench for leverage.

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I hate to admit it but that looks a lot easier than the "Jaxon" rims that GM uses.  In fact it even looks easier than Studebaker's style.

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2 hours ago, Tinindian said:

I hate to admit it but that looks a lot easier than the "Jaxon" rims that GM uses.  In fact it even looks easier than Studebaker's style.

They are fairly easy. I did a demonstration speech when I was a kid in high school about how to change a 1931 Dodge flat tire. The other kids saw me rolling the spare tire down the halls of the school and thought I was a little nutty. The teacher gave me an 'A' mostly on originality. Basically, once you shrink the rim, you just lift off the tire with the tube in it. Easy, peasy.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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As easy as it is Keiser , you must remember there are people here now who may have never worked with tubes on bikes or cars . And the rim is only a part of it . You talked of the under liner ,but there is stem alignment and powdering pre-inflating to set and prevent pinching , and other we somtimes take for granted . Picture or u-tube and the thousand words worth play here also . I did my first set on a car last year and almost forgot about tube liner as prior had none and tube was rusted to rim , and then bounce to ground to set tube and bead ,only to have rim collapse and tube bulge out side until it exploded . Just Thoughts . And love that you got an A  , originality is best .  

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Thanks for the instruction. I think my Chrysler has one of those tools in the trunk. Now I know how to use it. Much appreciated.

Pete Phillips

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An alternate option is to find a tire shop that can work on truck split rims.  Look for an older shop in a small town.   Many farm communities can handle split rims on older equipment.  Take your spreader.

 

I use a large screwdriver with square shaft & use a vice grip to clamp & turn the rim release.  I also use the rim spreader in connection with release.

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If I didn't have the correct tool I would buy a cheap extension, grind the end down to fit the slot and use the socket wrench handle.

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So...we're very curious. Did you make any progress?

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On 8/6/2017 at 3:04 PM, huptoy said:

An alternate option is to find a tire shop that can work on truck split rims.  Look for an older shop in a small town.   Many farm communities can handle split rims on older equipment.  Take your spreader.

 

I use a large screwdriver with square shaft & use a vice grip to clamp & turn the rim release.  I also use the rim spreader in connection with release.

Using the word "split rim" in a tire shop trends to set off a panic because the newer split rims require special care because of possible injury.

These older split rims can be changed with a tire bar and a screwdriver. I was able to change these rims using my shop tools. First one took 1 hour to figure out but the last one took 15 minutes 

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I would call those locking ring rims, not split rims. That avoids the confusion... sometimes!

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You are correct but I am not to sure modern tire shops recognize these older rims as split rims.

The locking ring is used on truck tires and can be dangerous to replace. Special protective cages are required.

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