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1925 Standard Saga Continues


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Glad you got home safely from Hershey. We did have a great time. Thanks for the info. This is what I can forward to Reeve's.

After you left the show field I talked with John Fesser as he had the 1928 in HPOF.

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On ‎10‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 4:09 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

The wrist pin bolts on my car are only held with a lock washer.  Larry mentioned that he has known someone where one of these came loose.  I would like to wire mine.  I have ordered 6.  I also plan to get 6 grade 8 lock washers to replace the existing lock washers as one I have is already missing a piece.

 
AN5H-12A  5/16-24 x 0.813 Grip Airframe Bolt, 1.34 UHL, Drilled Head  $0.79 
 
 
Hugh
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I am one of those persons that had the bolt break and I lost a cylinder and piston when the top of the rod broke on a tour.  Needed to sleeve the cylinder and replace the rod.  The good and bad of that experience is that I ended up putting aluminum pistons in the engine since it was out.

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Jerry

 

Buick thought one needed 6 of 108579 5/16"  lock washers  to make the engine operate correctly but I take your point. Times have changed and the evidence is clearly against split 'lock' washers.

Your suggestions for an alternative for this application? 

1) Just the bolt?

-2) bolt + loctite?

-3) bolt + internal or external toothed lock washer?

-4) bolt  + above lock washer + loctite?

-5) bolt + lock wire  ( Hugh has a lot more patience than I do !!!)

 

I'm thinking 3) as the Loctite would be a bit of overkill .

 

If your post had more info, could you provide a link?

 

Brad

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The 1928 Riley Nine engine I have nearly finished assembling has only loctite. I have used it before on engine assemblies amongst other things and believe it is superior to mechanical means such as lock washers etc. I recommend to just go with loctite, no need for the washer, which could fail like you have experienced.

Matthew

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What great responses!  Thank you. 

It's not normal anymore to see broken lock washers given current manufacturing controls.  I always see this kind of broken stuff on vintage fasteners, but I think rare on modern parts.  Especially if buying graded fasteners.  Tolerances and metallurgy are vastly improved since 1925. 

Since I bought the exact size drilled bolts as were in the engine originally, I may send them back and get a shorter bolt as I am leaning toward leaving the lock washer out.  If I stay with this length I may just use an improved lock washer.

 I made the same mistake as Brad did, and buggered up the threads on most bolts with the wrist pins being slightly misaligned and that flattened the threads on removing the original bolts.   Brad knows me too well now.  He is correct on my plan to do #5.  I have had some loctite failures where the loctite never dried.  I can't afford a failure here.

Not a rocket scientist, but what would NASA do?  Probably all of the above, and wear a hair net in the process to prevent contamination. 

 

Hugh

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3 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

 

It's not normal anymore to see broken lock washers given current manufacturing controls.  I always see this kind of broken stuff on vintage fasteners, but I think rare on modern parts. 

 

Especially if buying graded fasteners.  Tolerances and metallurgy are vastly improved since 1925. 

 

Hugh

 

I agree with this.  A lot of original lockwashers break when I remove them from the Buick, they snap right in half. 

 

New hardware, I have never experienced it. 

 

Loctite is amazing, but always do a test piece on the bench from the same batch you use on the car, to make sure it cures. 

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I don't know if your rods do fit or not but in cases where conrods use pinch bolts and when the rod doesn't fit down the bore, I fit the rod to the piston and bolt it together, then fit the piston from the bottom leaving the task of fitting the rings till last. A lot easier in my opinion than trying to fit the piston to a rod in the block.

Matthew

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I did not have time to read the whole post so if you still need the pipe from the rocker to the heat, I have one off a 28 Master that looks like it is the same as yours.   It is yours if you want to risk the postage.   fred.rawling@live.com   562 644-4670 are the surest ways to contact me.

 

Fred

 

 

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