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Xander Wildeisen

1958 Chrysler 300

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Very impressed by the amount of photos posted.. Kudos to the one who listed it.

 

Not a fan of those but I can see why folks like them. Very unique to say the least and looks to be really complete.

Fun project for someone.. Thanks for posting it !

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10 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

Very impressed by the amount of photos posted.. Kudos to the one who listed it.

I agree! 

 

Craig

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   Zena Creek Ranch appears to be somewhere around Yellow Pine, Idaho. About 1/3 of the way from Boise to Helena. 

 

Interesting to me that the typewriter shows a three speed transmission but must be before the park lever was added. Also thought the letter cars had buckets but guess that is incorrect also.

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At that time, there was no "Park" button or lever

on Chrysler Corporation's push-button transmissions.

The "Park" lever came later, I think in the early 1960's.

A good parking brake was supposed to suffice, and on

my 1961 Imperial, that parking brake operates off the transmission.

 

Chrsyler fans will surely appreciate your find, Xander,

and thanks for alerting us.  Those 300 models, I think,

are more often seen than their low production numbers

would indicate, because they are the prized top of the line.

Try to find something like a nice Windsor sedan or a Saratoga

2-door hardtop:  Those once-common models are much

scarcer than 300's today, and also deserve to be restored

for history's sake.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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This really is a find, as this VIN is not on the the last published 300 Club roster. The club shows 195 of the 618 two-door hardtops produced are accounted for, with 17 of those junked. (191 convertibles were built, too.)

 

Lettercars did not get bucket seats until 1960, and no Park in the trans until 1963.

 

Norm Thatcher ran 156.387 mph for class win at Bonneville in one of these in 1958, albeit with a modified engine. That car survives. Herbert Magee ran a stock 300-D with a manual trans 141.066 on Daytona Beach. Brewster Shaw set the Class 7 Standing Mile record with the same car at 87.485 mph. That car survives, too.

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Hope the post helps someone find a nice project. If it was sold in Caldwell Idaho, and has stayed in this area. It should be a solid car. I have projects waiting, and do not need another. The Chrysler letter cars are great examples of American styling and engineering, 1956 being my favorite. 

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Well atleast with being an Idaho car the potmetal looks to be in really good shape with really no pitting so rechroming won't cost quite as much. 

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For 59,000 they should atleast find a horn button for it.  That's a $100 item tops for atleast just a Chrysler cap if the 300 is different.  Makes you always wonder what else is wrong.  I do agree though,  you will have over 59,000 in that one to get it to the state this one appears to be in. 

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Restoration costs would depend on how much work a person could do themselves. An Idaho car should have very nice dash pieces/chrome/pot metal. The steering wheel will be toast. The rust you see on the surface of the trunk and roof, would be from the sun cooking the paint and snow sitting on it. Bought right, freshen up motor/transmission, get on the road for a summer. Live large driving a 300, and pass it on. Some long week ends, and sweet, could get that car on the road.  

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Looks mechanically dead to me from the amount of crust and accumulated dirt on the motor.  Might take more than a few weekends to get her running.  Especially if you can't devote a serious 20 hour weekend at a time.  Did they say if the engine is free or seized?  Brakes / Booster, Tires, Fuel System.  Didn't I just go through all that with another vehicle ;)  That one was actually already running and driving.  I wonder how the floors are as well.  That carpet almost looks moldy like water sat in it and Chryslers are known for floor rot with the undercoating stuff they used as a sound deadener.  

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With out looking at the car, a person would not know what they are up against. Idaho is a great State for finding nice solid cars. Sellers says 7x,xxx original miles, Motor should fire. Transmission would have an issue. Brakes and fuel system would need to be gone through. No different then any old car. If a person can do the work themselves, a lot of money would be saved. Looking over the costs you had on the Hudson truck auburnseeker, that bill would have been large if you did not do the work yourself. Chrysler's can be very expensive cars to restore, and Hemi engines are not cheep to go through. With cars like Hudson's not having a high finished value, I learned pretty quick how to do all of the work.:)     

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It's a money pit....................Bob

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It would be an nice concept!! too sad that i can't drive right now because of my health issues. gotta search for hgh pharmacy instead because of them... i miss driving so so much... i know what's the first thing i'm gonna do as soon as i'm gonna be able !

Edited by Pribill (see edit history)

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10 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Do not sugar coat it Bhigdog, let us know what you think.:huh:

 

Not saying it shouldn't be saved. Just saying it is what it is. Lord knows I've financed my share of money pits. I'm just saying.................Bob

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Unmolested and benevolently neglected.

 

I looked for the dash mounted rear view mirror. That is my first memory of those cars. Looking to the rear looked like driving in a tunnel.

Bernie

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On ‎03‎/‎08‎/‎2017 at 8:25 AM, 60FlatTop said:

I looked for the dash mounted rear view mirror. That is my first memory of those cars. Looking to the rear looked like driving in a tunnel.

Bernie

I had a neighbor who owned a '61 Plymouth that also had the dashboard mounted r/v mirror.  He didn't care for it at all.  He was not a very tall person, maybe 5'1" and found it difficult to see what was closely behind the car.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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Being rather tall I really liked the dash mounted mirror. You could see over the mirror without an annoying blind spot. A tall person's eyes are often right on the same level as the high mounted mirror. I really doubt that a short person would enjoy a dash mounted mirror.

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$6300 and climbing.

These are one of the cars that guys will spend stupid money on.

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What is stupid money on one of these? A lot of 30's  coupes bring 6,500-10,000 that need restoration. If a person was wanting a 58 300 project. And if this car was a complete solid example. What would be a fair market price?  

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57 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

What would be a fair market price?

 

Whatever a buyer will pay for it.

 

To a very wealthy person who just has to have it because he proposed to his wife in one just like it and he wants to have it restored for Christmas.......What ever it takes.

 

To a person of limited means who would like to have it restored and at least break even on it.......Zero value

 

 

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