alsancle

American Rolls Royce (Ghost, PI & PII)

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On ‎1‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 1:06 PM, John_Mereness said:

I sent out two emails asking - one to The Rolls-Royce Owners Club and another to The Rolls-Royce Foundation ( rollsroycefoundation.org ). Within a day the RROC had sent a note that my request had been sent to the Foundation and within another day the Foundation had answered saying they had located the card and asking how I would like to pay and how I would like to receive - I chose email).  The cost was as very reasonable $60.00.  I am not sure of the current process for an English car, though know I have asked for two 25/30 Series cards and received. 

 

That is VERY reasonable, considering a Marti Report for a Ford product is between $45 for a Maverick to $200 for a Shelby Mustang.  And Mercedes Benz charges €100 for a copy for theirs, plus proof of ownership.

 

Along with some of the others here, I've always like documentation, and if someone has their Production Order, report, etc., next to their vehicle at a car show, I'll include it, as well as the rest of the car when taking photos.  It is truly your car's "DNA".

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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I have done it for a couple of cars and the RR Club and Foundation are great.  They have done a good job of digitizing their archive.  I have not done a Marti in years, but there were 3 levels of report, and I believe they used to give you the original copy of your invoice (not a scan).  I have them for both of my cars.  So, it is not quite the same thing as what the RR clubs are doing.

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I posted this over in the MB thread because of the Cab A, but the Special Newmarket PII deserves to be posted here.

 

image.png.da07ffe82b20cf8c8a175793f7743fc3.png

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Where are the valve stems located? You can see them on the current photo, but not on the original.

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On ‎5‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 10:17 AM, West Peterson said:

Where are the valve stems located? You can see them on the current photo, but not on the original.

They appear to be body color and match the surrounding area making them difficult to see.

 

When one enlarges the photo, the rear one appears to be just past the six-o'clock position, the front wheel at the eight-o'clock position, in line with the reflection, and the spare at twelve-o'clock.  Look hard, but they are there.

 

Craig

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The disks have a small,round sprung door that pushes in and over to get to an air line that leads to the stem on the tube. The disks were sourced from the high end car accessory shop on fifth ave in New York City, the name escapes me. The car has 9000 original miles on it, and the disks are what was on it new. Four cars built is conjecture, only two are know for sure, this car has no devider and leather buckets in the front, broadcloth in the rear. Also the only one built with skirted fenders. 28.2 K when new in 1933. Makes the twenty grand Duesenberg look like a discount model.

C348E6D4-2D6D-448D-A463-A861294630BB.jpeg

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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On ‎8‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 10:56 AM, alsancle said:

Walt or Joe,  can you explain the differences in the heads?  I assume the later heads were an improvement?  Were there cracking issues with the aluminum?

 

Ed,  bring your Duesenberg stuff over to the Duesenberg thread and don't pollute the good thing we have going here!

"cracking "is an ambiguous word.   City Motor Services here in Melbourne ran a high end hire car service, mostly with Pierce Arrow Model 80s, with a few model 81s, and 5 or maybe 6 1929 straight eights; which they used for federal politicians travelling to and from Canberra.  At one time they also bought a job lot of excellent P1 cars from India, which apparently were fitted with very nice open touring bodies.  Sadly those had little appeal to their clientele, and drew a punitive import tax to protect the local body-building industry.  So the bodies were unbolted from the chassis, and tipped off the edge of the wharf into the Yarra river to save the tax.

First arrangement was they parked the P1s nose towards the plate glass wall of the office;  and the secretaries complained that they could concentrate for the noise of the engines cooling down.

I note the name of Sir Macpherson is mentioned as owner one Rolls Royce.   He accumulated a substantial fortune through manufacture of confectionary .  He was virtually a wholesale buyer of Packards,   but he may have liked the Rolls less,  and sold it in USA rather than bring it home to Australia.   I was told by the people who salvaged parts of his 1922 Twin Six Packard Runabout with Rudge 100mm wire wheels, that the car was ruined by a large tree that fell across the shed it was stored in.    He was very generous in spending his money for public benefit,.   Most of his employees were young women,  and he paid to build and initially run MacRobertson High School for girls in Melbourne.  There is quite a lot about him on the internet.

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I think the aluminum heads were too porous, so they tended to leak. I know my Phantom 1, S460MR, had its original aluminum head replaced with an iron head in 1960 when it was owned by John Maxfield. This was no easy job.

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The heads get porosity - RR treated them by I believe baking them in linseed oil - and then along came alcohol based anti-freeze and age.  They also corrode.  When one is going bad, besides overheating, you know the problem as there are green translucent chunks in the coolant that look like mint jelly.  The problem is well noted in the very first RROC newsletter in 1954 (ie problem has been around for a LOOOOOOOOOOG time).  I am very familiar with the problem via my RR PI (it was in the family since 1972 or 1973, and eventually had to get a new Frank Cooke replacement head.  By the way, on rare occasion a cast iron head goes bad - that historically has been quite a problem via being unobtainium.  You used to be able to get a new head via Fiennes (kind of scary they do not seem to have them currently listed) - with shipping and studs my guess is you were in the low 20K range.  Franke Cooke use to run his heads on a test engine prior to selling to you - all valves were set up too and ....

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Alsancle:  Yes, I think Peter Kumar of Gullwing Motor Cars bought it back, and then sold it again.

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Congrats Peter.  Hope you had fun with it while you owned it.

 

At the risk of repeating myself too much,  hard for me to tell what looks better here.  The driver or the Rolls?

MeSittingInRolls.jpg

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3 hours ago, alsancle said:

Congrats Peter.  Hope you had fun with it while you owned it.

 

At the risk of repeating myself too much,  hard for me to tell what looks better here.  The driver or the Rolls?

MeSittingInRolls.jpg

 

My eyes!, My eyes! 

 

Nice car by the way.........didn’t you always want a Ford Model T?

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Nice car by the way.........didn’t you always want a Ford Model T?

 

I think eventually we will have Model T's.   I was at a local show today,  probably 400 cars and not a single Model T was there, nor any prewar Classics except for a late 30s Lasalle coupe.

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Speaking of big Al,  here he is next to the "Cadillac" as he kept referring to it.  He was cracking me up.   He has a real bias against anything that won't go at least 90MPH.

IMG_4273.jpg

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Look at the bright side..........last time I bought a car and called him to see if he knew it because it was local to him in the 1950's...........he finally remembered the car, a 1932 Pierce five passenger sedan, and kept referring to it as the parts car because the top didn't go down. The funny thing was.......he really meant it! In his mind a closed car if for parts to keep the open ones driving. Such was the way of the early hobbiests......... I very much enjoy spending time with "Big Al"!

 

I don't know why Big Al doesn't like cars that won't do 90 mph. When I gave him and your mom a ride in the Murphy, he seemed to get nervous around 75 mph!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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Well, you can go 90 in the RR, but perhaps only once :(  Takes off from a stopsign or stoplight better than anything ever made though :) .

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