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SENTIMENTAL TOUR 2018 - A TALE OF TWO CITIES


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How Chance and Circumstance Changed The South:

 

November 5-9, 2018, the 10th Sentimental Tour, with a focus on the Antebellum South, featuring Natchez and Vicksburg, Mississippi.

For vehicles 1928 through 1958.

Natchez, Vicksburg, Vidalia,

The Natchez Trace, Native American Sites, Settler and Explorer Sites, Battlefields, MORE!

 

For details, Contact Tour Chairman Charlie Froehlich at (601) 749-9935

 

www.aaca.org

www.visitnatchez.org 

www.visitvicksburg.com

 

 

Early Handout.pdf

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This is a tour full of very exciting sites.  I have volunteered to work with this tour in any way I can to help the Chairman, Charlie Froehlich.  I'm really looking forward this tour.  Everybody get your 1928-1958 cars spruced up and mechanically sound, because you won't want to miss this one.  Charlie and Ardie Froehlich are one of the four couples who have made every one of the AACA Sentimental Tours, along with Stu & Clarice Allen (VA), Dave Kontor (PA) and Judy and myself (FL).  Ya'll come!!

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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I've promised to come to Philadelphia (one more time) to man the Sentimental Tour table, as Chairman Charlie Froehlich cannot come.  We will have beautiful flyers to hand out there....I've seen them.  This is a place I heard a lot about in 10th Grade American History class.    Yep, I'm that old!  They actually taught American History in high schools back in the day.  I came away thinking it was a place I'd always want to visit.  Ya'll come.

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Susan and I are already discussing this.   If all goes well, I may be retired so won't have to worry about using up all my annual vacation time for Hershey.  It'll be a great way to celebrate my birthday and it's part of the country we've always wanted to visit.   I think our 48 MGTC will be there!

Terry

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  • 4 weeks later...

Paul, I'm going to take the '39 Buick convertible sedan.  After this tour, I may sell it since I am thinking now I will sell my closed trailer.  I'll be 80 next October.  That said, I saw a well-known collector pulling his closed trailer home from Bettendorf, IA.  He was driving when we passed, and he is over 90.  Hmmmm. 

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Earl,  I sol my enclosed trailer at age 70, not because of my age but the open aluminum car trailer is so much easier to tow.  As you know, I don;t show our cars and washing it just before a Tour is easy & fun.  That darn enclosed trailer was like towing a sail boat with the sail up and nobody got a car show in the highway.  

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On 8/28/2017 at 8:26 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

Earl,  I sol my enclosed trailer at age 70, not because of my age but the open aluminum car trailer is so much easier to tow.  As you know, I don;t show our cars and washing it just before a Tour is easy & fun.  That darn enclosed trailer was like towing a sail boat with the sail up and nobody got a car show in the highway.  

*

*

You should pull my 30 footer Paul, the worse pulling trailer I have ever had. It really requires a dual tired pulling vehicle or a third axle on the trailer. On the other hand since I only pull about 4-5 times a year, I will put up with it.

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Marty, I've been to all those places, of course, my mother was from Natchez and spent more time there than should be allowed.  In the old days, the paper mill had the whole town stinking, no longer the case.

 

In spite of that, I'd love to do this tour, and will try to do so.

 

Ah, the hills of Vicksburg...ya might warn people about that!!  Natchez is flat land, though....

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13 hours ago, trimacar said:

Marty, I've been to all those places, of course, my mother was from Natchez and spent more time there than should be allowed.  In the old days, the paper mill had the whole town stinking, no longer the case.

 

In spite of that, I'd love to do this tour, and will try to do so.

 

Ah, the hills of Vicksburg...ya might warn people about that!!  Natchez is flat land, though....

Trimacar: Were you on the first Sentimental Tour, in White Stone, Virginia driving a green Pierce Arrow?

 

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Here is a preliminary idea of what we'll be doing on the 2018 Sentimental Tour:

 

Sunday, November 4 – Registration, Early Bird Tours around Natchez, Opening Function – Natchez, MS. Night at Natchez.

Monday, November 5 – Tour Natchez, lunch included. Night at Natchez.

Tuesday, November 6 – Visit Louisiana, Frogmore and Delta Music Museum in Ferriday, lunch included, return to Mississippi. Night at Natchez.

Wednesday, November 7 – Drive the Natchez Trace and other roads to Vicksburg, MS. Site seeing on the Trace, picnic lunch included. Night at Vicksburg.

Thursday, November 8 – Tour Vicksburg, The Battlefield and the various museums downtown. Lunch will not be provided. Night at Vicksburg.

Friday, November 9 – Drive US Highway 61 and other roads to Natchez. Tour Grand Gulf, Windsor Ruins, lunch provided, closing banquet at Natchez. Night at Natchez.

 

The above pretty well summarizes what we will be doing. Of course plans are subject to change, but Louisiana Region hospitality, as always, will be very much in evidence, and we hope you will bring a smile and take home great memories.

Due to limitations on our facilities this will be a fairly small tour of about 60 registered vehicles and 130 people.

Edited by Marty Roth (see edit history)
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Man, lots of memories of Natchez.  I had relatives who owned antebellum homes, they were the Whittingtons from Natchez.  My grandfather was mayor of Natchez for 20 years during the 30's and 40's., and his home on Union Street was designed by Stanford White's architectural firm.

 

Frogmore Plantation is owned by Buddy Tanner, a good friend of my brother....

 

And the list goes on....

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23 hours ago, trimacar said:

I don't recall being there, although interestingly I did have a green Pierce Arrow a while back.....

I was the tour chairman in White Stone, and the man with the Pierce Arrow was from Winchester.  I think it was a two-door sedan.  All my records are in Florida.

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25 minutes ago, trimacar said:

Oh, that was Bruce Dawson, he had a 1932 brougham....since sold..........

10-4 on that.  I'm up in Virginia and my book is down at my house.  The car was sort of a pale green.  Long time ago now. Used this tiny little town to get the ball rolling............since then the motel on the Rappahannock River has been torn down and can't be rebuilt because of the Chesapeake Bay Act.  The main building where the banquet was is still there and functioning.

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Glad we could go to White Stone while it still existed.  Even got stuck in the sand parking lot (Of which you remind me regularly)

These memories are part of the fun of AACA Tours as is seeing small towns and the back roads way of life.  We love it.

Natchez and the Trace will be a revisit, but Vicksburg will be new to us.   Last time on the Trace went to Tupelo  and were so

impressed with Elvis's childhood home we immediately drove to Memphis to see Graceland.  (Outstanding home tour)

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On 9/3/2017 at 3:12 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

Glad we could go to White Stone while it still existed.  Even got stuck in the sand parking lot (Of which you remind me regularly)

These memories are part of the fun of AACA Tours as is seeing small towns and the back roads way of life.  We love it.

Natchez and the Trace will be a revisit, but Vicksburg will be new to us.   Last time on the Trace went to Tupelo  and were so

impressed with Elvis's childhood home we immediately drove to Memphis to see Graceland.  (Outstanding home tour)

Well White Stone the town is the same as always; and the Marina and Condo's is still there at or near the beach.  The sand beach has been reopened to the public now.  It's just the motel complex that is gone.  The peninsula is still a great place for a tour, but banquet and motel facilities just aren't there.  We filled the motel in 2001 and a number of people used alternate motels and a few had their own beach houses.  All told we had 109 cars on that first prototype Sentimental Tour from 21 states, as far away as Colorado. 

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On 8/28/2017 at 8:26 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

Earl,  I sol my enclosed trailer at age 70, not because of my age but the open aluminum car trailer is so much easier to tow.  As you know, I don;t show our cars and washing it just before a Tour is easy & fun.  That darn enclosed trailer was like towing a sail boat with the sail up and nobody got a car show in the highway.  

Paul, do you tow a convertible on an open trailer?  You just have a 4dr that you bring now, isn't that correct?  I'm thinking of going the same way after 2018, but also selling my '39 convertible sedan.  I guess I could keep it for local stuff.  I love that car and have owned it twice.  I plan to take it to Natchez instead of the sedan.

Our 1939 Buick 41-C convertible sedan.JPG

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I towed the 34 Ford Phaeton to several tours on my open trailer, but towed with the top down.  I had a full tonneau cover made to cover the whole interior and top boot.  The week of rain and 43 degrees on the Michigan UP Glidden Tour in 2001 convinced us that a closed car was a better choice for all weather touring, hence the 34 Ford Fordor.

59aebaf878619_PhaetonFalls-Copy.thumb.jpg.8dd93f4139eaad1afda5e8e09a0303db.jpg

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ref: Tonneau Covers for Open cars:

 

We have towed the 1915 Hudson SIX-40 Touring going Cross-Country many times, usually in the closed 30 ft, extra-tall trailer (Reliability tour in Savannah - Hilton Head, etc.),

but have on several occasions also crossed the country with it on the Open Trailer.

 

We have two separate Tonneau covers - one over the rear portion to keep baggage, tools etc. out of sight, and a separate Tonneau cover for the front compartment. 

These two covers serve a multitude of purposes:

          1. covering the interior while travelling on an open trailer without the top or side-curtains catching the wind at highway speeds

          2. Covering the interior over night at motels to keep out rain, dew, and prying eyes

          3. covering the seats sometimes during tour stops so that the seats (and passenger thighs) do not roast from the sun

 

PS: Our '30 Packard has an additional Tonneau in addition to the two described above for the Hudson. Since the Packard has a second windshield and wind wings for rear seat passengers, a third Tonneau, matching the Haartz Canvas top (and trunk cover) extends from the rear edge of the front seat to the extended rear windshield, essentially enclosing most of the rear compartment, keeping rear seat passengers comfortable even in rain or in harsh winter conditions.  I came up with that idea after being a back seat passenger in another open car during bad weather, and it really works.

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
8 hours ago, Joe in Canada said:

I bought my US currency last week encase I am able to go.  I tell you the exchange works a lot better if you come up here.

 

Agreed, and I like your new "Self-Portrait" and "White Charger", but is ONE HORSEPPOWER a bit on the LEE side, Marvin?

(with apologies for Monday morning humor?)

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  • 2 months later...

Planning for the 2018 AACA Sentimental Tour in Natchez/Vicksburg, Mississippi are coming along great.  Chairman Charlie Froehlich has five willing workers in the area assisting him.  The Sentimental Star newsletter will be produced by AACA Master Editor Award winning Region Editor for the Suwannee Valley Region, Ralph Towner, along with former Master Editor Award winner retired Region Editor Earl Beauchamp.  Ralph Towner has agreed to write the Tour Report for Antique Automobile Magazine as well.  Motels, dinners, routing plans, etc are all moving along swiftly.  Keep your eyes peeled for the ads for the Tour in AA Magazines coming up.  While this is all going on, there is already a volunteer to plan and produce the 2020 AACA Sentimental Tour.  This Tour is expected to be in West Virginia, but has yet been set in concrete by the National Board.  Keep your ears to the ground for more information on the 2020 Tour.  When I began dreaming of this type of tour during my 3rd of 15 years on the National Board I never dreamed how successful the idea would be.  I've never stopped working for it....it's been "my baby".  I ran the first prototype tour like a Divisional Tour out of White Stone, VA in 2001 with 108 cars.  The Board approved it as a National Tour in 2003, after which I wrote the rules, and the first National Sentimental Tour was run the year I was National President in 2004, out of Manassas, VA.  As I move off into the sunset after my 80th year toward the end of 2018, I consider the Sentimental Tour idea, one to keep the cars that carried the USA through the Great Depression, World War II and the years into the Fabulous Fifties to have been my greatest accomplishment while serving on the Board of AACA.  So, we'll be looking forward to seeing you in Natchez in November, and after that, Lord willing, we'll make West Virginia in 2020.  After that, all bets are off. :)

 

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  • 4 months later...

The Sentimental Tour literature and registration forms were mailed out.  Mine was received here Saturday.  Make sure you got all of the information, including the registration form and daily list of events.  You can't register until August 1, but you can call your motel and trailer parking to register in for those.  Only 160 people can be accepted, don't be one to miss out.  This will be a great tour, headed up by the most experienced tourer I've ever met and the places are Natchez and Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Natchez Trace road, and a visit across the Mississippi River into Louisiana.  These were places of one of the most memorable battles of the Civil War that you only learn about in history books.  Don't miss this one.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Mailed mine yesterday, temporarily lost the application, so it's one day late. Hopefully we will make the cut. The only tour we will run this year, too many obligations. ?

 

Is Earl, Charlie and I the only ones going?????

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Towner, Briley, and I'm sure Dobbin are going.  Then there are the other two, Allen and Kontor who have never missed one.  I'm also sure Gage will be there since he's going to chair 2020.  I was thinking there were five who have done all of the tours, me, Froehlich, Allen and Kontor is only four.  Am I forgetting one?  Gettin' old.

 

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Sent my registration in on the 1st.  Registered the 41 Cadillac but may switch to the barn find(actually a rural Iowa airplane hanger 1979)  58 Barritz if I get it running by then.  I know Rich Marsh is coming also.  This is an area of the country I always wanted to visit. A big thanks to the Louisiana Region for stepping up to the plate.  Bob  Smits   

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