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1924 Dodge Brothers


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My father pasted away last year and left a restored 1924 Dodge in a million pieces. He wanted to get it in perfect condition before he died.<P>I am puting this car back together and have run into a couple of problems.<P>1. There is a hole in the block on the right side of the engine. This hole is inline with the cam. There is a flanged plug that goes through this hole. What is this? What does it do? What holds this plug in place?<P><BR>2. The block is cracked from the water jacket to the outside of the block. I do not want to weld on the block. Can I grind this and fix it with JB Weld? How deep should I grind?<P>Any info on the two problems listed above would be appreciated.<P>Thanks in advance.

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Smokey<P>That plug that you mention is there to hold the cam in place, other wise it will out of alinement with timing gear and lifters. There is a metal strap with 2 hole, one on each end that goes between the distribator and block. It will have 2 shoulders bent between the bolt holes to alow it to fit over the plug. <P>As far a the crack in the water jacket, I have not had good luck with JB Weld, it seems that plastic expands differently than metal and it will eventuly leak. How bad is it cracked? There is a welding procedure that will work. If you would like give me a call and I can explane it to you. 970-834-2419 evcenings after 8:00 pm<P>Chuck grahambros@greeleynet.com rolleyes.gif" border="0

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Concerning that cracked block, Chuck is right-on. The block in our 1918 DB has a crack about a foot long just above the carburetor bolt-on. It was patched by the previous owner (and restorer)with what I assume is JB Weld. Started leaking last summer and we are in the process of replacing the engine with a rebuilt one.<P>Les

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I don't know about JB Weld, but had several minor water jacket cracks that were orignally fixed with a flowed-in nickel compound. After several years (my guess at least 10) the nickle started to deteriorate leaving an engine with weeping water stains on three sides. So, I drained the cooling system, dug out all the nickel, undercut each crack, wire brushed them throughly, cleaned them with carb cleaner, then filled each with epoxy radiator patch - three thin coats. Then I sanded and primed/painted them to original engine color. Only one is even noticeable, and they haven't leaked since 1994.

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