Jump to content

1926 dodge roadster


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a 26 motor and the radiator spills over a little when I run a little. My question is that there is no gasket under the radiator cap, is there suppose to be or is this not a sealed unit, and will it hurt my enging if I put a gasket under the cap?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes there is supposed to be a gasket under the radiator cap. I make my own out of cork gasket material using a utility knife. The cork is ideal because it swells when wet and makes a great seal. Keep 'em Dodgin. grin.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I received a direct e-mail response from Randy yesterday. After several exchanges, I realized that he has many issues with this roadster that probably need input from other sources. So we decided that it was a better idea to get all this back on the DF. He sent a jpeg file photo of the car that I am e-mailing to peterg.<P>1.<BR>Subject: Gaskets<BR>Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2002 12:33:20 -0800<BR>From: Randy<P>Thanks, I'm new to the club and bought a 1926 dodge roadster last year but am trying to find out more about it. I figure I can put cork gasket material in the carburator as it leaks out of the bowl, but didn't know about the radiator. Also I am looking for a top to it, If you hear of any please let me know. (enclosed is a picture of my car.) Thanks Randy<P>1A.<BR>Subject: Carb Gaskets<BR>Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2002 16:20:06 -0500<BR>From: Ted <BR> <BR>Randy -<BR>I handled leaks differently for my Stewart two chamber, updraft carb, which is on an early 23 DB. There are several reasons that a carb bowl will leak - 1. too much fuel pressure, 2. float has gas in it or is<BR>damaged causing it to sink in float chamber, 3. needle valve dirty or damaged, 4. float weights not operating correctly, 5. ventrui inlets or chamber in carb fouled, 6. carb body gaskets leak air, 7. injector valve<BR>stem is dirty or sticks, 8. carb to intake manifold gaskets leak. None of the gaskets I've seen or made for the Stewart carb are cork, always heavy Kraft paper, which you can make out of super market paper bags for the lighter gauge and buy at any parts store for the heavier gauge. FYI, the Stewart carbs do not have a gasket for the float bowl cover -<BR>it is vented to the atmosphere. Today's gasoline is very different than in 1926. Much higher octane and a lot of very high end refinery cuts that tend to evaporate easily and gum up these old fuel systems if left to sit for months on end. Also be aware that leaded gasoline generally became available in the very late 20s and early 30s. Every two or three years I take the carb off, disassemble it and soak it in carb cleaner<BR>for a day or so. Amazing what comes out of the carb. These early DBs were designed to work on low octane, 50-60, unleaded fuel.<P>2.<BR>Subject: Re: Carb Gaskets<BR>Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2002 14:00:56 -0800<BR>From: Randy<P>The person that built my car put an electric fuel pump on it and more than likely is too high pressure for the carb. I have the original fuel pump but will have to rebuild it I'm sure. Is there anyway that I can control the fuel pressure out of the electric fuel pump? Also I don't seem to be keeping a charge on my battery. I think he wired it wrong as I can't get the head lights to work with the ignition on. Maybe the ignition is bad? I can turn the head lights on but the engine shuts down then, since the switch<BR>is the ignition switch. I don't know where I can get a wiring diagram for it.<P>2A.<BR>Subject: Re: Carb Gaskets<BR>Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2002 17:43:53 -0500<BR>From: Ted<P>Let me think about some of this stuff. For sure, what you need first is a 1926 owner's manual, which doubles as a shop manual. Some places to check for availability are the major literature vendors in Hemmings -<BR>Walter Miller, Bob Johnson, Faxon, McLellan, Lloyd's and others. Also an ad in the DB Club magazine might get one, and often they turn up on e-Bay. A complete manual will have wiring diagram, lube chart, lots of<BR>photos, and how-to descriptions for all major systems. Another book you should buy is the reproduction of the 1927 DB Mechanics Manual, which is about the same size as an owner's manual, but has some good info. This is sold by Crank 'n Hope publications in PA. Look them up on the internet. And if you can find one, there was a reproduction years ago of the DB Master Parts Manual, published in 1927 and covering everything to-date. Lots of photos. Also, for the electrical system, there is a separate owner's manual - NorthEast Electrical for DB.<P>Let's get some help here to keep this ole DB Dodgin! frown.gif" border="0confused.gif" border="0shocked.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Ted,<P>Although I grew up with my Dodge, I know surprising little about Dodges. My 25 model is magneto ignition. Is the 26 model coil ignition?<P>If a petrol pump has been installed, the pressure may be too high, which would cause the carburettor to leak. I still run the vaccuum tank, which has never given trouble. I would recommend going back to the Vaccuum tank, if you still have all the working parts, and see if that solves the leaking problem.<P>Marty

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Martin -<BR>Domestic US DBs went to a coil/distributor ignition sometime around 1916/1917. I will have to look up the exact transition date. I agree that a major part of the overflowing carb float problem may be high pressure from the electric pump. These Stewart vacuum tanks work very well if the gaskets are good, the little brass valves seat properly, and the vacuum line is clean and tight. The DB Club magazine and Skinned Knuckles have published several articles about how to restore and maintain vacuum tanks, which have an undeserved bad rap. Good to hear from you blokes from Down Under. smile.gif" border="0grin.gif" border="0wink.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...