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Wooden Spokes


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The wooden spokes on the 1915 Dodge Touring are a unique turning. They have a cross section that is not round, not oval, but a 'tear drop' shape. I'm guessing that made it more aerodynamic when it was spinning! I saw the same model at the Harrah's car museum in Reno and they had put oval spokes in it.<BR>Is that the common practice or are tear drop shape spokes available for this car?<P>Thanks!

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Great G -<BR>DB, at least through the mid 20s, had wheels supplied from several makers. My '23 has the standard Kelsy wood spoke wheels, which are painted midnight blue. Michelin steel disc wheels were also available. I'm not aware that any of the early wheel makers used tear drop spokes. Mine are round in front and round with a shaped, fitted center rear wheel spoke. When I get a chance, I'll take a look at some of literature and manuals. confused.gif" border="0

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D-B Grandson in Mt. View,<P>There are quite a few D-B's in the S.F Bay Area. We also have a loosely knit Club of sorts. If your going to keep that old D-B, you might want to joins us for Tours & Special Events.<P>I might be able to answer you question about the spoked wheels, if you give me more details.<P> Keep-on-Dodgin'<P> Donn Marinovich<BR> the Sonora ScreenSide<BR> dcmmld@mlode.com

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We had the same problem with our early 15 tourings when we restored them back in the 70s. One of the cars had fragments of spokes remaining with very rusted fellow bands and rims. I'm not sure who's wheels are on our cars, Hayes or Kelsey. I think our 15s and 16 have Hayes but I would have to look at the rim clip to be sure. <P>The biggest problem we encounterd was finding a wheelright with a jig large enough to bend the fellows. We found a Amish buggy maker who agreed to turn the new spokes, bend the fellows and true the wheels as long as we did not bring the rims with the rubber tires. <P>The body of the spokes were not turned in a lathe but drawn with a knife. The wheelright made a set of draw-knives to match the profile of the spoke and then 'carved' the spokes from stock to match the profile. It was actually a very simple task. <P>I believe that the spokes are not round as the brake drum sets behind the spokes setting the weight of the vehicle off-center from the rim. By making the spoke tear-drop the beefy part of the spoke is in the back and reinforces the wheel against the offset pressure while maintaining a sleek profile to the visual side of the car. Our later Dodges have a larger brake drum and a bolt through some of the spokes to draw the two together to relieve this strain.<P>I wouldn't worry about the air turbulance caused by the odd shape.....if you are going fast enough to worry about the churning of the air from around the spokes you have a bigger problem as that car only has two wheel brakes!<P>As one old codger quipped....Sonny, t'ain't who fast she'll go that counts. Pay 'tention to how fast she'll stop!<P>Just wait until you have to reline the cone, aka jack-rabbit, clutch.

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