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Got my 'new' 5.00 x 24 B. F. Goodrich tire today from a tire company in Tennessee. 

 

Anyone what to guess how may years old  my $230 tire is already based on the D.O.T. date code?

 

Waiting to hear back from their customer service team.

Edited by MrEarl
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19 minutes ago, Brian_Heil said:

Anyone what to guess how may years old  my $230 tire is already based on the D.O.T. date code?

 

I'll guess June, 2014.

 

So how old is too old? The tires on my Buick were installed at least 5 years ago.

 

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 Maybe quality control will eventually get better , but probably not in monopoly sizes. Perhaps you will find rare NOS still serviceable (eg. Bernie Long at some point). We are lucky to have Coker for the unavailable anywhere else sizes , and some never to be run again inventory. And for Stuart : plan ahead. Among present "Real" Antique Car owners on AACA at this time , you may very well eventually be the "Last Man Standing". Always keep your eyes open for consumables. That includes ignition from Tom Van Meeteren. You need a much longer haul strategy than most of us. Keep up the good work !   - Carl

 

P.S. Sorry , I didn't place my bet. Brian , I'll say your Birthday back in 2010.

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14 hours ago, C Carl said:

 Maybe quality control will eventually get better , but probably not in monopoly sizes. Perhaps you will find rare NOS still serviceable (eg. Bernie Long at some point). We are lucky to have Coker for the unavailable anywhere else sizes , and some never to be run again inventory. And for Stuart : plan ahead. Among present "Real" Antique Car owners on AACA at this time , you may very well eventually be the "Last Man Standing". Always keep your eyes open for consumables. That includes ignition from Tom Van Meeteren. You need a much longer haul strategy than most of us. Keep up the good work !   - Carl

 

P.S. Sorry , I didn't place my bet. Brian , I'll say your Birthday back in 2010.

Carl,

 

My beef is that they are sold as new.  At what point/age should they disclose that prior to sale?

 

I get the issue with NOS on some parts like ignition, trim, etc but not on tires.

 

It was me and the wife on the guardrail-less mountainside last week in Tennessee not the tire company owners fanny.

 

Edited by MrEarl
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What are the laws on new vehicles?  I've seen 2 year old "brand new" tires on brand new cars.  I've seen worse on boat trailers and campers.  When my father in law bought his 2004 Sea-Ray, it had "new" tires with a 1999 date code.

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The last set of BF Goodrich Silvertown Cord high pressure tires that I bought from Coker for the '16 were made in Viet Nam I believe.  That was several years ago and they still have zero miles on them.  They look like the day I got them.  Brian, I know what you are thinking when you take into account what you paid for that tire.  Somebody is making a killing off that tire in regard to the price and it ain't the manufacturer.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I got 35 years out of a set of double whitewall Universal Tires.  They were bias.  It is my opinion that if the tires are on a car stored in a garage, or are kept in a cool dark place, and they are not radial, they'll last for years safely.  It is radial tires that you have to really, really, really watch the age on.  Six years maximum for cars and trucks, three years maximum for car trailers.  Now, that is just my opinion, and it's worth what you paid for it.

 

I actually wore one smooth like I often did back in the 50's and 60's when I was young. :)

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Another thing to think about.  No tire store will touch a tire over 10 years old if you need a flat fixed or a balance or a rotation.  So if the tires show up 5 1/2 years old (like mine), you've already lost half your useable life of professional service. 

 

Most of us don't wear these tires out, we don't drive our cars enough, that's important to this age issue, not everyone can or will mount and service their own tires.

 

Technically, if the 'new' tires arrived 10 years old, you could not get anyone to mount them.

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1 hour ago, Dynaflash8 said:

I got 35 years out of a set of double whitewall Universal Tires.  They were bias.  It is my opinion that if the tires are on a car stored in a garage, or are kept in a cool dark place, and they are not radial, they'll last for years safely.  It is radial tires that you have to really, really, really watch the age on.  Six years maximum for cars and trucks, three years maximum for car trailers.  Now, that is just my opinion, and it's worth what you paid for it.

 

Chinese/India/Timbuktu trailer tires (or passenger/truck tires too) is a subject all to itself.  Seems the folks in China don't care if you lose a day of your vacation stuck in some remote spot with blown tires.  Funny how they never fail at home.  My last one was on the boat trailer, on a Sunday, in the middle of Michigan's U.P.. 

 

The good news is, Goodyear heard us and responded with a new, made in the USA product line.  My bet is others will follow.  https://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/endurance

 

I also know of others who switched rim sizes (to 16 and 17 inch) on their trailer in order to mount made in the USA LT truck tires after their own Chinese 'vacation'.

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Gents, I have done some editing to the title subject and text of some posts. Please be reminded the AACA does not allow negative or potentially negative comments toward specific vendors or their products. Sorry, but thanks in advance for your understanding and compliance. 

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The Big O tire chain, and a few others, have a written corporate policy prohibiting repair of tires over six years old by date code.  This applies to both radial and bias without differentiation.  I agree that radials deteriorate far more quickly on my modern iron than do the bias plies on the old iron.

 

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Radials- if over 4-5 years you are on borrowed time. They can separate  on a spare rack and have never touched the ground.

Bias-I have ran 50 year old bias tires with good success. I didn't do super long runs in the Texas heat but they held together year after year. I finally changed them after the fabric was visible through a few cracks. I feel that bias tires stored indoors away from UV could be safe for years.

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3 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Gents, I have done some editing to the title subject and text of some posts. Please be reminded the AACA does not allow negative or potentially negative comments toward specific vendors or their products. Sorry, but thanks in advance for your understanding and compliance. 

 

Mr. Earl, doing his job.  Thank you.

 

My buddy mentioned to me at lunch.  Isn't it funny the tire store won't touch a 10 year old tire 'just too dangerous', but they won't hesitate to dismount it and sell you a new one.  Ha.

 

Here's another interesting article while we wait for Tennessee to call.

 

https://rvingwithmarkpolk.com/2012/11/08/trailer-towing-st-tires-vs-lt-tires/

 

My point in all of this is to be familiar with tire date of manufacture, manufacturer and manufacture location.  The Tire Fairy is not going to visit you and tell you your tires are shot but the Angels just might.

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Instead of a "secret code" most consumers aren't even aware of or know how to read,  why doesn't the DOT determine shelf life of the different types of tires when stored under certain conditions, then require the manufacturer to boldly stamp tires with an expiration date  based on that. Of course then the storage of the tire prior to sell would have to be monitored through facility inspections with Heavy fines and suspension of manufacturing and suppliers operations to those who don't comply. 

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20 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

Instead of a "secret code" most consumers aren't even aware of or know how to read,  why doesn't the DOT determine shelf life of the different types of tires when stored under certain conditions, then require the manufacturer to boldly stamp tires with an expiration date  based on that. Of course then the storage of the tire prior to sell would have to be monitored through facility inspections with Heavy fines and suspension of manufacturing and suppliers operations to those who don't comply. 

Good luck getting those regs in place. 

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Here in Las Vegas there are many independent tire shops. They will mount any tire you bring them. The big chain tire stores are always afraid of lawsuits so they have strict rules. They will sell you new tires and that is their goal. None of the chains will plug a tire anymore or repair previously plugged tires. Independent tire shops will if you ask.

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My brother is still running with bias ply tires on his 1949 Buick that have a date code from the early 1970's.  The tires appear to be in great shape and he has not encountered any issues at all with them thus far.

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4 hours ago, Grimy said:

The Big O tire chain, and a few others, have a written corporate policy prohibiting repair of tires over six years old by date code.  This applies to both radial and bias without differentiation.  I agree that radials deteriorate far more quickly on my modern iron than do the bias plies on the old iron.

 

I'm not sure the tires back in the day were "bias" tires.  I remember Rayon cord tires, and then the Nylon cord tires were supposed to be better, but in fact that had a tendency to get flat spots on the bottom until they warmed up if left sitting too long.  I seem to remember TV ads, and I think from Ford, that touted "new" bias ply tires.  In any case, I suspect "Big O", whoever they are, don't have much call for "bias" tires.

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7 hours ago, Brian_Heil said:

Another thing to think about.  No tire store will touch a tire over 10 years old if you need a flat fixed or a balance or a rotation.  So if the tires show up 5 1/2 years old (like mine), you've already lost half your useable life of professional service. 

Go to a gas station.

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1 minute ago, Dynaflash8 said:

In any case, I suspect "Big O", whoever they are, don't have much call for "bias" tires.

Earl, I agree completely, but I guess it's easier for them to have a single policy, not that I agree with it.  It's the triumph of the lawyers...

 

When I have an older tire to repair, I go to the local 2-man tire shop or a truck tire shop and don't get any grief.

 

BTW, Big O is a large chain west of the Mississippi.

1 minute ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Go to a gas station.

Out here on the Left Coast, gas stations rarely change/repair tires, and the few that do I wouldn't trust.

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7 hours ago, Brian_Heil said:

The good news is, Goodyear heard us and responded with a new, made in the USA product line.  My bet is others will follow.  https://www.goodyear.com/en-US/tires/endurance

 

I also know of others who switched rim sizes (to 16 and 17 inch) on their trailer in order to mount made in the USA LT truck tires after their own Chinese 'vacation'.

I don't know, I bought FOUR new Goodyear 15-inch Size E tires in Smithfield, NC last year after two blowouts on my closed trailer, on the way from Florida to Virginia, and he told me to get rid of them in three years, no matter how much thread they had or what they looked like. The blowouts were about four years old. Can you guess?  I'm not a fan or Radial tires for my old cars.  If they blow the fender off on the modern car or Suburban (as one did for me pulling a trailer with my old Suburban, well, that can be fixed).  I do use radials on one of my two "new" antique cars, mostly because they're cheaper to buy.  I may put Diamondbacks on the '64 Wildcat, if it ever gets finished, just to get the appropriate width whitewall.  I guess I consider those two cars more expendable, and they definitely drive better on the tractor-trailer-grooved Florida roads.  You know, back in the day, we didn't have such heavy tractor-trailers, and also there weren't as many of them.

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5 minutes ago, Grimy said:

Earl, I agree completely, but I guess it's easier for them to have a single policy, not that I agree with it.  It's the triumph of the lawyers...

 

When I have an older tire to repair, I go to the local 2-man tire shop or a truck tire shop and don't get any grief.

 

BTW, Big O is a large chain west of the Mississippi.

Out here on the Left Coast, gas stations rarely change/repair tires, and the few that do I wouldn't trust.

Well, a whole lot of things are different on the "left coast". 

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1 minute ago, Dynaflash8 said:

Well, a whole lot of things are different on the "left coast". 

Oh yes indeed, including far less humidity!  :-) That makes it almost worth it....

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I hadn't realized ST tires were only rated for 65 mph. That may explain the failures I had on the tent trailer. I generally don't speed when towing but Interstate speeds are typically 70 or 75 in the nearby states. 

 

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This is one of those things that you don't know who to believe.

Of course the tire lobby would love for state or even federal law makers to put in place laws dictating how old a tire can be to pass inspection.

Mr Earl in on the right track.....not all tires are created equal.

An example of old tire safety....within the last couple of years, one of the national auto magazines did an article on an old Indy race car......it resides in the Speedway museum.

The got it out and run it around the Indy speedway doing laps up to 70.......the cars was. I believe a Offy powered car run just after WWII...the tires were at least 50 years old.

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12 hours ago, Barney Eaton said:

This is one of those things that you don't know who to believe.

Of course the tire lobby would love for state or even federal law makers to put in place laws dictating how old a tire can be to pass inspection.

Mr Earl in on the right track.....not all tires are created equal.

An example of old tire safety....within the last couple of years, one of the national auto magazines did an article on an old Indy race car......it resides in the Speedway museum.

The got it out and run it around the Indy speedway doing laps up to 70.......the cars was. I believe a Offy powered car run just after WWII...the tires were at least 50 years old.

Non-radial tires were, I believe, much better 50 years ago then they are today, but they typically only ran 20-25,000 miles before going bald or almost bald.  However, I never experienced a blowout until years later.  My first one was with an old bias ply tire and my Dad's truck-driving advice paid off.  After that, I've experienced many with radial tires, plus many ply separations.  My Dad's advice still paid off.  "Hang onto the the steering wheel, don't dare touch the brake and ride it down."  I personally do not share all of these safety claims for radial tires.  However, they run 75,000 miles, never go bald, hold the road better and for a  1960's and later cars are cheaper to buy.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Fellow stopped by yesterday trying to sell a set of 4 Model T wheels, rims and tires. The tires appeared as new and were Wards Riverside brand sold by Montgomery Ward. How long ago did Montgomery Ward cease operation? The fellow had a wildly inflated idea of the value of the wheels and tires.

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36 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Fellow stopped by yesterday trying to sell a set of 4 Model T wheels, rims and tires. The tires appeared as new and were Wards Riverside brand sold by Montgomery Ward. How long ago did Montgomery Ward cease operation? The fellow had a wildly inflated idea of the value of the wheels and tires.

 

Saw several new sets last week while on Tour.  They are being sold 'new'.

 

http://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/wards-riverside-tire

 

http://www.lucasclassictires.com/Wards-Riverside_c39.htm

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Ooooops,

Do I need tires ?

These came with the car, and we drive it all over central Colorado.

And I heard that "Martin" filed for bankruptcy in the mid '40's.

Anybody believe in time travel ?

 

I am keeping an eye on Dave's new Lesters, just as a backup plan.

 

Mike in Colorado

100_1235.jpg

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Lesters are fine so far. I have had them on just shy of a year, probably put about 400 miles on them. Whitewalls still white, no brown bleedthru as yet. They also held the air fine all winter. I am starting to drive the Buick more so stay tuned.

 

Cheers, Dave

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