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Hello Ben

Thank you! Following a "wake up" call from my son Steve, I have decided to leave the Triumph exactly as first intended. While perhaps not to everyones liking the design of the body has become, over the past 20 + years a little like my signature and is instantly recognisable to anyone who has bothered to look at the bodies on the Dodge "Flying Four", the Singer "Brooklands" and  the two Morris Cowleys, "Bottomley" and "Nellie" among others. The last name "Nellie" was an intended pun. I wonder how many of you can see it?

 

Bernie j.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, oldcar said:

and  the two Morris Cowleys, "Bottomley" and "Nellie" among others. The last name "Nellie" was an intended pun. I wonder how many of you can see it?

Is this a reference to 'Nellie the Flying Cow', the first cow to fly in an airplane? :huh:

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Sorry Paul 

Nothing as complicated , simply the title of the Judy Garland song, "Nellie Kelly I love you." The pun was the play on the words substituting Cowley for Kelly. You are probably too young to remember Judy Garland. 

 

Incidentally  "Bottomley" was so called because he/it was found at the bottom of a garden. 

Note the shape of the tail and use of "flat" panels.  The Triumph will have a side mounted spare wheel. 

 

Bernie j.

 

59769a14bf36c_BottomoftheGarden063.jpg.fc1d98cf266af5a8b16ec45d416fbb56.jpg

 

59769ca0cce9b_34_rear068.jpg.4dd5d396adf94a17e5d20b9b8a0cd7ff.jpg

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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On 7/25/2017 at 11:05 AM, oldcar said:

 The Triumph will have a side mounted spare wheel. 

How quickly things can change, having given this some more thought overnight, I decided that this was not really the answer and I have now reinforced the frame at the tail and constructed a mounting point for a rear mounted spare using a spare brake drum. I still have to take the wheel centre and a rim to be sand blasted then have a wheel built.DSCN5546.thumb.jpg.e2c8d8baee540a47165c16de2f90a170.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Bernie, glad you are going to the rear mounted spare; your old Morris Cowley looked good that way, plus retained the rounded 'rear end' bodywork. (To me, the flat angled panel with the rear spare would have been good looking too, but I fully understand staying with your traditional design.)

 

Are you using oxy-acetylene welding, or a MIG? Seems like I remember on a previous project you were oxy-acetylene welding (old school methods :) ).

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Hi Paul

I only have/use my trusty oxy-acetylene set up. I do have an ancient arc (electric/stick)welder but only use it rarely on heavy gauge steel components. Currently I do not have any rods so have not used it for some time. I probably need a new helmet/mask too. Before I used it again I would have to spent half an hour practicing on some scrap to get the "feel" for it again. I find with the oxy-acetylene I can make any necessary adjustments as the work proceeds. I can also use the "oxy" for silver solder and bronze for things like windscreen frames etc.

 

I am definitely "old-school".

 

Bernie j

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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This morning a nice man in a flat bed tray truck delivered a 1200 X 2400 (4' X 8') sheet of aluminium, so I had something better to do than sitting inside twiddling my thumbs or watching TV.

I am still using a pair of "snips" that I bought, at what was then great expense, when I was 18. (A very long time ago)  Probably one of the best investments I have ever made. When I bought them  they would have used up all my "pocket money" for a week or two.  They are an English brand if my memory serves me right "Gilbrow". I have three or four pair of other "super (Aero) snips" that I never use, they are so bad by comparison.

 

Bj.DSCN5553.thumb.jpg.0595b6e1fa1312956186673f1737663e.jpgDSCN5551.thumb.jpg.f551725d31773e5c25896394ec01bf14.jpgDSCN5554.thumb.jpg.b94c4e6ae662f8be603e3d674f647676.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Please do not be concerned about the Blue colour of the sheet of aluminium, that is just a temporary protective plastic coating that comes with it. This peels off quite easily.

 

Bj

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Bernie, do you rivet the aluminum skin to the carbon steel frame? I tried blowing up the picture of your Singer, and it sort of looks like rivets but cannot tell for sure.

 

How do you roll the edges?

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Hello Paul

You really do want to know all my secrets!

Yes, I do use the dreaded "pop" rivets. The thing is to be able to hide them. 

As I am sure that you are aware, I only have the most basic of hand tools,

an electric drill and an angle grinder is about where I stop. 

Much of my "stuff'" I learnt from watching a now long since departed

English craftsman coach builder who had learnt his trade hand building

those elegant, high wheeled, Baby Carriages that we occasionally see

photographs of in high class magazines.

Like me, he worked alone in a relatively small workshop.

If you look carefully at some of my photographs you will notice I have a selection of old bent

and broken "G" clamps and two or three "welder's friends", etc.

 

Bernie j.                                                                                                                                          1238

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Now that we have turned to another page, how about some statistics? 

In the past 19 hours, 63 people have stopped by for a quick look at this thread.

That is 1.7368421 per hour. Yet none have felt compelled to make a comment. ????

Being on the other side of the world, perhaps they did not want to disturb my sleep.

Not one even wanted to know what/who is the "welders friend".

Obviously the people who read this are far more knowledgeable than I had given them credit for.....

 

Bj

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Are you using the brake drum so that the wheel/tyre is spaced off the body, supported only by the mount? One Riley Nine I had allowed the tyre to be touching the body and this was detrimental to the paint. The current Nine has the spare on the luggage carrier with rubber buffers to support the tyre which works a lot more bester.

Matthew

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You  are quite correct Matthew, there are four spare brake drums and one off these will be incorporated in the spare wheel mount.


Just before one of the bright eyed super sleuths discovers it; I have just placed a for sale advertisement with my friends at PreWarCar ofering the Triumph for sale!

I know that this sounds crazy but having started to make the panels for the body I had time to think, something I possibly should not do!

Doing lots of thinking and some mental calculations I decided that the last thing I needed right now was probably a Triumph Super Seven. Even more so having just cancelled my application to join the Pre 1940 Triumph Motor Club.

Bj.

 

Let us just say it was a Triumph of wisdom and rationale over youthful exuberance.

 

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Bernie, we definitely have enjoyed all your posts, projects, pictures, and adventures! And especially getting to know you a little bit.

 

I hope you will keep us up to date on your adventures with the Lagonda. (But I also know a guy like you can only polish and tune an essentially complete car for so long before he gets the itch to do another project. ;))

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Bernie, I for one will miss you and your adventures.  Keep us up to date on your Lagonda tours and maintenance.  All the best, and you never know, another "simple" restoration project may come your way.     John in Virginia

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Don't look now but we have turned to a new page.

The Triumph has been sold and will be going to the far north of Australia. It has been replaced by an early 1920s Studebaker. This is reputed to have been in dry storage since 1941. It is remarkably original and complete.

 

Bernie j.

 

IMG_4527.thumb.JPG.6fb92624ec407a10f4367c84a7b3dc24.JPG

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hello John

Thank you for your interest and support. I am told, "You have to strike while the iron is hot".

Right now I am split between "Our cars and restoration projects" and the Studebaker thread and I must not forget my faithful little Lagonda. It thrives on "Tender loving care". I feel that the Studebaker was just too good to let go.......

 

Bernie j

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Not a very good photographs but the Triumph is all wrapped up for its long journey from Melbourne to Cairns. 2,944kms taking the direct route. It is a long way between drinks! Look it up on Google Maps. Where there in nothing on the map, it means that there is nothing there!

 

Bj.DSCN5561.thumb.jpg.e546447f2a711dbb3f576c4b202c1f0d.jpgDSCN5562.thumb.jpg.f9e8637d3d96b77c97b5a51ab840bf63.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

I have now heard from the new owner and at his request I have sent him photographs of a number of cars that I have done in the past using the same basic format for the body. I gather from this discussion that he intends to complete my body. I also included a couple of photographs of the early 1920s Aston Martins which were the inspiration for my body design. They are all basically flat panels  with joins covered with a crescent mould and without compound curves, requiring the use of an "English Wheel".

 

Bernie j

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59b9bbe1301f1_1919Dodge109.thumb.jpg.89d80d8740ff7bee48dcea6626aacfac.jpg59b9bbed173fb_FlyingFour190.jpg.2b12e91ed296abc2bcbb90c61d909650.jpg

3:4_rear 068.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good Evening, I´m from the Continent :), excuse me to intrude - this project is really admirable, my project is very simple - to drain the radiator on my "Southern Cross" which I bought last weekend - and I´m not able to find the tap :wub: - I´ve bought recently Instructions for the Care and Maintenance (1934) - and - no help - just "drain the radiator" no Fig. Thanks a lot!

Kamil

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Hello Depardieu

For a temporary fix you could just remove the bottom radiator hose where it joins the radiator bottom tank. 
The Southern Cross seems to have been over shadowed by the Glorias. It is a very long time since I owned my

Southern Cross so I am sorry I cannot be of much help. You may have to look from underneath. It should be on the face of the bottom tank facing to the rear, at one end or the other. You may have to jack up the front of the car to get under and look.

Don't forget to put some stands under the springs/axle before you get underneath it!

If you had bought a Lagonda Rapier you would have had much more support and help.

Perhaps next time?

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hello Bernie, you remember well your car - I´ve found on YouTube a video where there is a reanimation of the Gloria motor and in fact the radiator hose is composed of two hoses which form an angle and in the angle there is a brass piece with a faucet - on the contrary I´ve seen /Brooklands auction last year a S.C. sold/ another Southern Cross - and the same solution as that of mine - only the hose - yes they seem to have been over shadowed by the Glorias  ..........- so I´ll remove it and in the future refabricate a faucet.

Yes a Lagonda Rapier ...... :) Thanks a lot! anyway for your answer, thank you.

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  • 10 months later...

bernie .i just had speedex eng in melb do my super 7 louver panels very good finish . i am currently restoring a 1930 /30  super 7 at painting stages now . don't be surprised if the diff is shot as all the diffs i have are either worn to a razor edge or the planetry gears have exploded. i also had pearl coat do the steering wheel they polished the aluminium spokes and coated the wheel with the grips .I am impressed with the steel frame   as it took nearly 2 years on and off to completely re timber my 7 all the very best with yours

mark 7

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  • 2 weeks later...

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