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Hello All,

I know that we have been down this path once or twice before. This one will be a new experience for all of us. I owned a 1934 Triumph 10 Hp with a Coventry Climax four cylinder ioe engine what seems a lifetime ago but I have never owned a "vintage" Triumph (pre 1930) before. The Super Seven was sold in competition with a bevy of English light cars, Austin Sevens and Morris Minors being just a couple of examples. Attached is a photograph of my next project ready to be collected by road transport to bring it from Canberra, the Australian Capital to our home in East Doncaster Victoria. At this stage you all know as much as I do or perhaps even more. I have not yet seen my purchase.

If you look them up you may discover that SUPERCHARGING was a factory option.

Hold on tight!

 

Bernie j.59479e179a298_Super7packed002.thumb.jpg.a746470fefd8c90c0f2e7ea2a5301d3b.jpg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Have no fear Paul. 

It is to be loaded onto one of Cameron, my friendly transport specialist's, B Doubles for the 8-10 hour drive from Canberra to Melbourne. Take time to look at one of Mr Google's maps, "Garron A.C.T to Doncaster East, Victoria". This will give you a little insight into travel in Australia. It will be coming straight down the Highway but by diverging onto some of the local roads you may even be tempted to come and visit. There are some great drives through the mountains. You may need snow chains this time of year. We are said to have more "ski-able" snow in the Australian Alps than in Switzerland. Check it out! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiing_in_Australia

 

For now I must change horses. The new water-pump seal arrived in yesterdays mail so I have to quickly change to my Rapier hat and get to work on putting KG 5363 back to gather. AT LAST.

 

Bernie j.

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Paul,

 

That is not bungee cord actually but something we in my part of Australia call "Paramatta Rope".  It is woven blue and yellow rope with Blue and Yellow being the colours of the Paramatta Rugby League Club (Rugby League being a very popular sport on the eastern parts of Australia) - hence the name.  It is very strong rope and while I would never advocate towing that load with only one or two points tied down, I would wager you could tow that a fair distance and it would never come off.

 

Bernie, I have been silently following many of your restorations on this forum and am looking forward to seeing you to go to work on the Triumph!

 

Cheers,

 

Andrew.

 

 

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While digging through my"archives" I discovered the attached photographs of a 1932-4 Triumph 9hp "Southern Cross" that I owned between 50 and 60 years ago. It had  a "tuned" version of Coventry Climax IoE 1100cc engine and a four speed gearbox complete with a very sporting "remote control" gear change.

Instruments were:- Rev Counter with a clock included in the face. Speedo with both trip and total milage. Twin rotating barrel combined temp and oil pressure gauge and a fuel gauge. All in a Walnut timber dashboard.  Lucas lighting included two modern(ish) Fog/Driving lights.

It was a two/four seater with front bucket seats. And a Brooklands steering wheel. Girling mechanical (cable) brakes.

I am led to believe that it was repainted from dark green to cream shortly after I sold it. I have never seen or heard of it since. It is amazing how, what even then was a quite rare car, can simply disappear.

Bernie j.

 

5952043dec0dc_Triumph22SouthernCross.thumb.jpeg.d1071ebb901aad84d7ef55c3c146f009.jpeg

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hey Paul where have you been? First the French and then the English have been building racing and sports cars ever since the first cars were built. Because of the British Laws governing the use of motor cars up to 1904 that compelled pioneer motorists to have a man walk in front of their cars waving a red flag and ringing a hand-bell, any motor racing was restricted to private property (Brooklands) and off shore islands. EG Isle of Mann etc.

The famous London to Brighton Run was originally called the Emancipation Rally when the Man with the Red Flag Law was lifted in 1904. This is why that Run is restricted to Pre '04 cars. Under UK Veteran Car Club rules only pre 1904 vehicles qualify as Veterans. Racing at Brooklands actualy did not start until 1906 but planing and construction of the banked concrete track started a year or two earlier These two early photographs are from William Boddy'sHistory of Brooklands 1906-1940. If you can find a copy it makes fascinating reading.

The first photograph shows the 1907 team of 60hp Napiers at the start of their 24 Hour Run Average speed 65.9 mph over 1,581 Miles.  The second photograph is of a 1909 20 hp Vauxhall timed at 88.6 mph over a half mile.

The third photo is of a Lagonda at Brooklands in 1909. Lagonda actually started production with motorcycles in 1899.

Lagonda were the first manufacturers to build "unit construction" cars with an angle iron "space frame" in 1913.

Steel panels were copper riveted and soldered onto the galvanised frame. Photograph 4.

 

The other book you could look for is Georgano"s Encyclopaedia of Motor Sport. It will tell you that Motor Racing started in France with the Paris to Rouen Race in July 1894.

 

Through their association with Aston Martin, Aston Martin Lagonda is probably one of the oldest motor manufacturers in existence 1899-2017 and still going. Certainly the oldest in the UK.

Provided you can afford one, you can buy a new Lagonda today!

 

Bj.595443ec5898c_Brooklands1907.thumb.jpeg.ee3b5c43ee7a5b3027349c6a72a8abb1.jpeg

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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At long last the Triumph has arrived and is now all unpacked and standing in my little garage. At this point I must say that I am more than happy with my purchase and I am impatient to make a start on it. First I need to stand back and make an appraisal of what is required AND having looked at the rear of the chassis my first thoughts are that I may have to revise my ideas on the body style best suited to it. I need to spend some time doodling on a sheet or two of scrap paper. Following myusual practice I will construct the body frame BEFORE thinking about painting the chassis or starting on the engine. I will not know how far I need top go with the engine until I have it out of the chassis and the sump (oil-pan) removed. By doing the body first I do not need to be worrying about damaging fresh paint etc. As a complete change from my earlier restorations the Triumph has hydraulic brakes to all four wheels so striping then down and taking them my friendly brake specialist will come quite high on the must do list. 

Just doing a quick mental "stock-take" I am very pleased that there is very little missing. What is missing are mainly things like a speedo and switches which usually can be found at swap meets or through the club network. Switches are mainly Lucas and the speedo is Smiths so should not be impossible to find.

I am pleased to report that the German-silver radiator  is in good condition and mainly needs polishing.

You will be relieved to hear that I am feeling far more positive about this little car than I have about either the Renault or the Humber.

It is much more my size and style. I  can actually walk all around it with it standing in my pocket handkerchief size garage/workshop.

My early thinking tends to steer my thoughts towards a two seat roadster similar to this Morris Cowley that I rebuilt some years ago,

 

Bernie.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Good looking chassis Bernie, especially the quarter-elliptic rear suspension. Not sure why this design never got used much by USA manufacturers.

 

What type of shock absorbers were used?

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Is that a worm drive differential? If so do you know the ratio?

 

A club member here had a Triumph Super Seven roadster for a little while, his main comment was if this was the performance of a Super Seven he was glad he didn't have a Standard! He didn't own it long as he felt it was too pedestrian for his tastes, being used to Riley Nine and Alvis 12/50 cars amongst others.

 

Matthew

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Hello Matthew

Yes it is a worm drive. I am not sure of the ratio.'Clushaw & Horrobin'in their Complete Catalogue of British Cars, do not give a ratio for the Super Seven but give 5.25 :1 for the Eight (next year) and I imagine that the Seven was the same.

 

Hi Paul

Shock absorbers were Armstrong rotating drum type. This is the first time I have seen this pattern.

 

BjDSCN5506.thumb.jpg.41bf8d54a71042067b3d73dfc1b2c33b.jpg

 

 

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Not wanting to waste any valuable time I have just placed an order for 7 lengths of erw steel tube. 4 of 12.7 x 12.7 x 1.6.  2 of 19 X 19 x1,6  1 of  35 x 19 x 1.6  This should be delivered some time this week.

I have cleaned up but not yet painted the steering box and column. 

I still have to decide what colour to use on the chassis etc. Just for a change my first thoughts are for a deep navy (ocean) blue. 

Drawings. What drawings? 

It is all safely tucked away in my head....... 

 

Now you will have to wait and see.

 

Bernie j.

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That ratio shouldn't be too low geared, and given that I expect it would be very difficult to obtain a higher ratio quite acceptable. At least you won't have to worry about building a body to heavy for it.

 

I know some purists look down their noses at steel frame bodies rather than the traditional wood, but at the end of the day you can't tell from looking what was used. I have a steel frame for my Riley and expect that it shall actually be better with greater rigidity and fewer noises.

 

Do you have a magneto remagnetiser or shall you take it somewhere? Flange mounted maggies are not very common, and looks not unlike that fitted to Riley Nines which matches Crossley and Bentley.

 

Matthew

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Hello Matthew

It is my experience that once the panels are on and the trim in place unless you are lying on your back looking up under the dash you would never know.

For little cars like the Triumph any weight saving has to be worth while. As a bonus, less squeaks, rattles and noises. The Mag is as you say very similar to that fitted to Riley 9s.

I have a specialist magnet man who can re-magnetise the magnet while I wait. About 10 kms away.

 

Bj.

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18 hours ago, oldcar said:

Drawings. What drawings? 

It is all safely tucked away in my head....... 

 

Now you will have to wait and see.

 

Bernie j.

 

Very much looking forward to seeing the body building process.

 

I'm not creative enough to do something like that. Mechanically, probably yes.......but design-wise, I'd end up with something akin to a rectangular box since I tend to think in straight lines and 90 degree angles! :)

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Hello Paul

A very pleasant driver arrived on cue this afternoon and delivered the seven, six metre lengths of steel tube. That is 42 metres which sounds like a lot of tube but don't be surprised if I have to order a length or two more. Already I have cut up almost one entire length and the shape is forming nicely in my head. I may have to make some adjustments as the work proceeds but that is one of the good things about working in steel tube. You will just have to be patient as I will not be taking any photographs until there is something for you to see.

Be assured I will try very hard to avoid a rectangular box. My little home made tube bender will be working overtime.

 

Bernie j.

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Just touching base. Without a scan of my brain, I still have nothing that I am ready to show you, it is not that I am not doing anything, quite on the contary.

To date I have used up a pack (10) 100 mm cut-off disks in my angle grinder. In the process I have used three of the seven lengths of tube so I am actually making progress. The contents of my acetylene bottle is disappearing fast. It is a bit like an artist who starts with a blank sheet of paper. I can visualise the finished body just don't ask me to show it to you. Just yet!

Bj.                                                                                                                                                                                                    402

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Good to hear that the body is moving along. Looking forward to the pictures when you get further along Bernie.

 

Figured you either were hard at work on the body fabrication, or out touring with the Lagonda Rapier.

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Thank you Paul 

Right now the Triumph seems to be taking up all, well most of, my time. Apart from one quick test drive down the street and back I have not driven the Lagonda anywhere for over seven months.

Changing the subject, how many people are watching the bicycle race "Tour of France" on TV? Helen has all her maps and Road Atlas of France out, tracking their route every night. It is amazing how much of their route is over roads and through places that we have driven along in the Lagonda.

Bj.

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Bernie, wow, you are moving right along as usual. 

 

It looks like someone had started with the restoration a long time ago.  Most of the mechanical, sans engine, look to be clean.  What are your expectations for the mechanical bits?  Do you have specs on the engine?  

 

Any history on the car? 

 

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Hello John

Sorry, no history but quite a bit of work has been done on the chassis, springs, front and rear axle, the engine appears to be in quite good condition but it will need new timing chains, the generator and magneto are also chain driven. I have to make a new mounting bracket for the steering box in order to lower the steering wheel. The previous owner also has a restored example of the same model, he has sent me copies of the owners manual and spare parts catalogue. There is an active Pre-1940 Triumph Club, there are about 50 Super Sevens on the Register, mainly in England, there are a dozen or so in Australia but no others in Victoria where I live. There are two listed as being in the USA, one in Texas the other in Colorada. There are a number of other 1930's models here in Victoria, I already know some of the other owners. The good thing is that it is mechanically complete so I will not have to be chasing obscure parts. Having said that the only instrument I have is the oil pressure gauge and only one headlamp. The nice thing about British cars is that most used standard Lucas Electrics and Smith's Instruments so finding replacements is not too difficult. I have discovered that there is a company that specialises in cutting louvers, quite nearby which will make the bonnet (hood) much easier to make. The four wheels are in good condition, there are two spare wheel centres, one rim but no spokes. With an injection of money I can have two spare wheels. It should end up as a smaller version of the Morris shown at the bottom of #10. Perhaps with a different style of mudguards (fenders). There is to be a door on the passenger side but not for the driver.

 

Bernie j.

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A very good friend tells me that I should slow down! My reply to him was, If I slow down, like quite a number of my "vintage" friends, I may go to sleep and forget to wake up. Thanks for the advice but I think that for the time being I will continue as I am.

As with most "old cars" it is better if I am started up on a regular basis and taken for a run at every opportunity.

 

Bj

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Sorry no more photographs just yet; I have stopped work for this evening, it is already dark and the street lighting was switched on at about 5.45 pm here in Melbourne, Australia. 

I am moderately happy with this afternoon's progress. I have finalised the shape of the tail and have started to weld up the rear section of the frame. All I need to do now is to cut up and bend another length or two of tube and weld all the bits together. Easy peasy. AND yes I have slowed down, I did virtually nothing this morning as I had to go and get a refilled acetylene bottle and buy another bundle of mild steel welding rods.

 

Bj.

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This slowing down has its benefits. Did no work at all yesterday morning. Friday is our weekly shopping day when we go to the supermarket and local shops for our provisions for the comming week. This takes up most of the morning so I did manage to do some work in the afternoon. I still have to do the hinged lid for the rear luggage space and a door for the passenger side. Put in some more triangulation stiffening, then there are all the details like somewhere to mount the windscreen supports, dash-board mounts and pivot points for the hood (top) bows. All these things need to be in place before the panels are fitted. Finally I can lift the frame off and turn it over to complete all the welds on the underside.DSCN5531.thumb.jpg.53620f72a55c5b2dac009e72342f6578.jpgDSCN5530.thumb.jpg.67e46bdce3b40d806584c5f16b5b6203.jpgDSCN5529.thumb.jpg.5c6ec6b0bccb502329ee4b29858902b8.jpg

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Now I really am in trouble. The person I bought the Triumph from does not like what I have done to "his" car! I have told him that he can buy it back for what It has cost me to date.DSCN5533.thumb.jpg.e8a8e4c8dd94ed72d90029ff41fbe8fd.jpgDSCN5534.thumb.jpg.427c48b53ca74344c5f21b141868ad01.jpgDSCN5535.thumb.jpg.59bf6727933f1ec58aa775f6606c0679.jpg

DSCN5532.jpg

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4 hours ago, oldcar said:

Now I really am in trouble. The person I bought the Triumph from does not like what I have done to "his" car!

 

Oh well, he should consider that the car is getting finished and will be driven, which is what it was designed for!

 

The body frame is looking good Bernie - I can get a good feel from these latest pictures what the shape of the body will be.

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596df4f66a2e8_Singer8hp808.thumb.jpg.8933eac4e940a6965bd08f7a01a3e525.jpgIgnoring all the armchair critics, I have now started on the last lap of the frame; the lid for the luggage "trunk" in the rear. 

 

Sometimes to see into the future you have to look at the past. I built this little Singer 8hp a very long time ago.

 

Bj

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 I have now started on the next step forward with the frame; the lid for the luggage "trunk" in the rear. 

 The problem with email is that it is  all instantaneous and perhaps we read into things, criticism which is not intended, it is time to move on. There is still a very long way to go with the Triumph.

I make no secret as to where the inspiration for the design of my straight-sided bodies comes from, if it was good enough for Aston Martin it is OK by me.

They did a road version with lights and mudguards too.

 

22asmCountZborowskiGrandPrix_twin-cam16V_klichkamashinyGreenPea_Motorcities.jpg.d271431218c8e5bd4ffe191302332d4d.jpg

 

Bernie j.

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Hello Paul

In a word, Yes. It is my plan to have it fully road equipped, that is Road legal. This includes Lights, a Horn and what we call mudguards and you refer to as Fenders. I have not yet decided whether to use steel or aluminium for them. I will probably have them made for me by a friend, a retired  coach-builder who can do the wired edges much more neatly than I can. There are pros and cons for both materials. That decision is still a little way down the track.

 

Bernie j.

 

 

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It has been a very cold (for us) wet and windy day not ideal for working in an open garage but I did and hour or two to keep the record straight*. Just about finished the lid for the luggage trunk. I have now all but used all the steel tube delivered on July 4th so I must have acheived something.

I am almost ready to lift the frame off so that I can complete all the welds on the underside.

* Doing some thing constructive every day.

 

Bernie j.

 

DSCN5537.thumb.jpg.8191f501a2f8c3a289b337c1bcb85bc3.jpg

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I am sorry that this must be very boring but there is no way that I can make short cuts or shorten the progress, for me, whilst it is time consuming I am constantly thinking ahead as to how I can improve the frame and what will be needed once I start to shape and fit the panels. Important things like, have I included sufficient support to attach little things like floor, seats, interior trim, even the dash and steering column brackets. How will  the windscreen be attached? Once the panels go on it is too late.

Added to this, this is a unique one off construction. Put simply, there ain't no drawings, no plan, no book of instructions to follow. There is only what is in my (80 year old) head and I cannot just print it out. You may find it boring but I certainly do not.

What I am creating is not a REPLICA but a totally original body. No one is asking you to even like what I am doing. Some of you  probably hate it. That is OK too. There are lots of cars that I would never want to own.

 

Bernie j.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Hi Paul

Thank you for your on-going support, You will probably never know how much I appreciate your interest and comments.

Following some soul searching, I am considering the pros & cons re changing the basic design of the Triumph "tail".

This will involve cutting off the rounded section at the extreme rear and replacing it with a slightly sloping flat rear panel with the spare wheel mounted directly onto it,  vaguely in the style of a "T" type MG. The rear luggage "trunk"and lift up lid will remain.

I have asked three VSCC "friends" for their suggestions but it is probably asking too much to expect any comment or opinion re this!

I will not be starting to prune the frame until tomorrow.

 

Bernie j.

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