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1926 Model 50 Engine


STJ
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I have a 1926 Chrysler Model 50 4 door Phaeton 

It has sat for about 5 years in a garage, I just got it started today, new plugs and wires. 

I had to remove the head to get some vales unstuck. In doing so I how have a leaking head gasket, maybe because I am hot sure of the torque for the head bolts, all of which have had the treads on the stud and nut chased.

So any heap on torque and source to find engine gaskets would be great.

 

Thanks Jeff

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Did you use a die nut to "chase" the threads on the head studs? If so, you have probably removed some metal and increased the clearance between the stud and nut. if you also ran a tap through the nut, there is even more clearance. So take great care torquing the head nuts, they will be easy to strip.

 

There were no torque figures before the mid '30s or so. Use a generic chart. Go in by bolt size and threads per inch and use the Grade 2 bolt value, perhaps minus a couple of lb.ft to allow for the loose threads. Here is such a chart.

techtorque.pdf

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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OP said he "chased" the threads, and I'm hoping he used thread-CHASING taps and dies, in which case there shouldn't be a problem, especially if well oiled.

 

As for torque, start at center and radiate outward.  Try 50, no more than 55 lbs/ft, but do it once at 25, once at 40, and then twice at the final torque.

 

NOTE:  If you use modern, reproduction gaskets that do NOT have real asbestos centers in the sandwich, you will find it necessary to re-torque four or five times, about 50-100 miles apart.  Always re-torque COLD.  You do not want to pull threads out of the block!

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I did use chasing tap and die but they were very loose so some one may have done this before me.

The head bolts are 7/16-20 and the chart Spinney posted says 27-36 oiled or dry. I went to 25 then to 30 when I resembled.

There was a little compression coming around 2 of the center bolts, but stoped after it warmed up. 

I made tracings of the head gasket to look for a new one. 

I will get to looking for them on the site you sent later tonight Keiser.

 

Thanks Jeff

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15 minutes ago, STJ said:

but they were very loose

Perhaps someone before you replaced the nuts with those from F*stenal, which I found out the hard way are way too loose (offshore production).  Suggest you purchase a new set of 7/16-20 nuts of Dorman or other good auto parts store (like NAPA) manufacture. Exterior size may be smaller these days, in which case look for **hardened** flat washers slim enough so you get full coverage of the stud threads with the nuts.  Those washers will spread the load some, which is desirable.

 

Glad you didn't go beyond 30 when you reassembled, which is probably 45-50 if the nuts fit properly.

 

You can trust Olson's gaskets--I use them exclusively.  But you might ask if they have an NORS gasket with a true-asbestos center, always preferable even if it costs more.

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Thanks wil do on the new nuts and washers.  The head didn't have any washers on it and the bottom of the nuts are flared out a little.

I will call Olsons Gaskets Monday. I looked on their site and they don't list and Chrysler 4 cyl engines.

 

 

So still looking for gaskets, 1926 Chrysler M 50 4 cyl

 

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