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Quartz Clock Conversion And Refurbishment


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20 minutes ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

Yes, dipped the whole of the mechanism, tried to keep the face out of the liquid as best I could. Certainly had no adverse affect on anything. It air dries quickly too! And the solenoid kicks in every three or four minutes is normal. It has a power supply (12V) so doesn’t need to run any longer than that.

 

If you want a good article look up “putting the tick tock back in your car clock” , great read and very clear.

cheers

Rodney

Ive restored 6 of these Borg clocks to continuous running condition in the last few days and the time between solenoid activation has been between 1 minute on the low side and 1 minute 30 seconds on the high side with  most falling in the 120 to 130 seconds range. I`m sure the actual degree to which the solenoid moves the mainspring is dependent on the freedom of movement of the mechanism and the condition of the contact points and strength of the solenoid but...if one actuates the sweep of the mainspring manually to the stop of its travel I`m sure the running time for this full rewind is MUCH shorter than 3 to 4 minutes....more like 2 minutes and 20 or 30 seconds. It is highly unlikely the solenoid will rewind the mainspring to the full extent of its travel. Just my 2 cents..

  Tom

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So I believe I have found the problem with my clock, and wondering if there is anyway to fix it? It is in very nice condition, but what I have found is that it will stop after a while even though everything is clean and free. It always stops as the points close and the solenoid should kick , but it doesn't. If I just barely touch the points they kick and the clock starts again. What I have found is the point contact is missing from the negative leg of the points. with this missing it lets it unwind a little to far, and the points arc against the metal bracket.. Any ideas?

 

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8 hours ago, crowvet said:

So I believe I have found the problem with my clock, and wondering if there is anyway to fix it? It is in very nice condition, but what I have found is that it will stop after a while even though everything is clean and free. It always stops as the points close and the solenoid should kick , but it doesn't. If I just barely touch the points they kick and the clock starts again. What I have found is the point contact is missing from the negative leg of the points. with this missing it lets it unwind a little to far, and the points arc against the metal bracket.. Any ideas?

 

 

Is it possible to make up a metal contact and solder it in place?

Rodney 😀😀😀😀

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4 hours ago, rodneybeauchamp said:

 

Is it possible to make up a metal contact and solder it in place?

Rodney 😀😀😀😀

I was thinking of cutting one off of car points, then using a conductive epoxy to attach it???? Think it would work, the contact shouldn't get hot as infrequently as it connects

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Of course you can do that.

 

I converted my original clock to quartz many years ago and it has run flawlessly for years with no maintenance, keeping perfect time.  The electro-mechanical style clocks are just a pain.

 

YMMV.

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Got the clock working😃 I took a contact off a set of car points and glued it on. The conductive adhesive to glue the point contact on does not work. Next I tried to solder the contact on, not sure what the contact is made of, but could not get it to solder. Next I found a point set with the contact attached to a copper arm. I cut the contact off leaving the copper attached to it. I ground the copper backing to match the shape of the contact and smoothed it all out with sandpaper. After some time I was able to solder this to the clock arm.I filed both contacts clean. The clock has been running for 5 hrs now😎

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8 hours ago, crowvet said:

Got the clock working😃 I took a contact off a set of car points and glued it on. The conductive adhesive to glue the point contact on does not work. Next I tried to solder the contact on, not sure what the contact is made of, but could not get it to solder. Next I found a point set with the contact attached to a copper arm. I cut the contact off leaving the copper attached to it. I ground the copper backing to match the shape of the contact and smoothed it all out with sandpaper. After some time I was able to solder this to the clock arm.I filed both contacts clean. The clock has been running for 5 hrs now😎

Hi Daryle,

  Can you post a pic? If you used ignition points they are much larger than the original clock points.  I was concerned the change in size/mass would negatively affect the cycling period. Now that you have changed the points, how much time elapses between point cycles? Just curious...

  Tom

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3 hours ago, 1965rivgs said:

Hi Daryle,

  Can you post a pic? If you used ignition points they are much larger than the original clock points.  I was concerned the change in size/mass would negatively affect the cycling period. Now that you have changed the points, how much time elapses between point cycles? Just curious...

  Tom

Hi Tom, the cycle time is about 1minute and 20 seconds. First picture is a before shot. Not sure why I can only load one picture to each post?

P1070428.JPG

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  • 1 month later...

Sent my clock to the Machesney Park Instrument Services for a quartz rebuild.  Upon return it was losing 20-minutes a day; so much for their QA testing.  I sent it back and they returned it so quickly that they couldn't have tested it for more than a day.  Sure enough it's still losing time, and I can see the seconds hand actually slowing in spots. 

 

Anyone recommend--from personal experience--another shop that can rebuild these clocks?

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15 hours ago, Hans3 said:

Sent my clock to the Machesney Park Instrument Services for a quartz rebuild.  Upon return it was losing 20-minutes a day; so much for their QA testing.  I sent it back and they returned it so quickly that they couldn't have tested it for more than a day.  Sure enough it's still losing time, and I can see the seconds hand actually slowing in spots. 

 

Anyone recommend--from personal experience--another shop that can rebuild these clocks?

I installed one of their quartz movements in my 69 Caprice clock and it worked flawlessly. I agree with Telriv, I believe your movement is defective. Insist on a warranty replacement.

Edited by NC68Riviera (see edit history)
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On 1/18/2019 at 7:04 PM, Hans3 said:

Sent my clock to the Machesney Park Instrument Services for a quartz rebuild.  Upon return it was losing 20-minutes a day; so much for their QA testing.  I sent it back and they returned it so quickly that they couldn't have tested it for more than a day.  Sure enough it's still losing time, and I can see the seconds hand actually slowing in spots. 

 

Anyone recommend--from personal experience--another shop that can rebuild these clocks?

 

Sometimes the adjust knob does not retract fully.

Make sure the lens and/or your hands release allow this.

 

I put a quartz in my last Monte Carlo and this was exactly the case.

 

Took me a week to figure it out.

 

 

 

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On 12/10/2018 at 10:21 AM, 1965rivgs said:

. Or, you can send it to me and I can do it internally. My workbench is setup for working on the clocks at this time,

Tom

 

Tom,  Do you want to take a try at my 1960 Buick Clock ?  I cleaned it up and it worked for a little while but it has quit winding.  Points look good and its getting 12 V so I am afraid the winding cold is bad.

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7 hours ago, Bill Stoneberg said:

 

Tom,  Do you want to take a try at my 1960 Buick Clock ?  I cleaned it up and it worked for a little while but it has quit winding.  Points look good and its getting 12 V so I am afraid the winding cold is bad.

Hi Bill,

  Sure, no problem. Send it to me and I can take a shot...or, give me a call after sending a couple of reference pics and we can walk through ohming out the coil to check it. Shoot me a PM,

Tom

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/9/2017 at 7:36 PM, bob71GS said:

Last year I sent my clock to Instrument Services to have it converted to quartz, after getting it back and installing. it ran for about 5 hours then quit, if I tapped on the dial face plate, it would start running again. this kept going on for a week. I called them and they told me to send back, after 2 weeks they sent it back and said they could not find anything wrong. To this day, it runs for about 5 hours then it quits. I have to either tap on the face plate or pull out the stem to get it to start again.  I'm extremely disappointed in their work and not being able to fix it. I would never send them anything ever again.

 

Bob Bonto

Bob, I got mine back and the first attempt the clock failed. I sent it back and they sent me another one right away. The second one works fine. It can be frustrating, but I'm sure if you called them again and said, " It still is not working" they would make good.

Turbinator

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  • 1 month later...
On 12/3/2018 at 1:17 PM, SwedeDownUnderR63 said:

Setting the clock once at each trip isn't that hard compared to the hours I had to spend to get it out...

 

This thread is a bit old, but here's the method I use to get the clock out:

 

Wrap a wide rubber band around the chrome bezel of the clock, like those blue ones the produce stores use to bind broccoli stalks together.  The rubber band gives a good tight gripping surface. This obviates the need to remove the speedo and idiot light chrome bezels - there's enough room to twist the clock out.  The clock will pop right out with a good grip on the rubber banded bezel.  Use the same technique to put the clock back in.  Try it a couple of times and you'll be getting the clock in and out in seconds!

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