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Kaftan

Old Parts Conundrum

Old Fuel Tank  

8 members have voted

  1. 1. What's the tank's fate?

    • Toss it
      5
    • Keep it
      3


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Greetings!
 
Throughout the light restoration/rebuilding process on the '46 76-S, I've been accumulating a box full of small parts 'n such that I've replaced.  Most are small and incidental, and aren't taking up much space. HOWEVER, I'm still tripping over the original fuel tank and fuel neck assembly (which I replaced with aftermarket parts).  This tank is not useable in its current form; on top of the extensive cleaning required to remove the crud 'n rust from the innards, there are a couple spots where rust has eaten entire holes through the tank.  They aren't very big, but still render the tank unusable :)

 

So you guessed it, my question is:  What does this community recommend I do with this (and future) replaced part(s)?

 

From what I've found, '46 parts, part dimensions, part diagrams, etc. are quite difficult to locate.  I'm hesitant to dispose of this tank, thinking I'd be losing a piece of history; somebody somewhere might want it for documentation purposes...?
 
Thanks in advance for your input!

 

large.56f60d10bb4dd_(2016-03-25)OldFuelTank-Removed.jpg.543a257d0cc3685736270a85c9b7260c.jpg

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"This tank is not useable."

 

Toss it if you aren't going to ever use it again. It is just taking up room.  You can't worry about other people's future wants.  They will find what they need when they need it.  I recently went through my garage and tossed out items I've had for years and wonder why I ever kept them in the first place.  Hoses and belts I've replaced, old spark plugs, broken headlights, rusted trim pieces, etc.  It feels good now to look at my shelves and see empty places for the next item.

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If my extra salvage tank was in the way, I'd toss it.  It's not, and nobody makes 1939 Buick tanks, so I've listed it on eBay.  It will stay there until someone wants it or it gets in the way.

  • Like 1

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2 hours ago, Kaftan said:

Greetings!
 
Throughout the light restoration/rebuilding process on the '46 76-S, I've been accumulating a box full of small parts 'n such that I've replaced.  Most are small and incidental, and aren't taking up much space. HOWEVER, I'm still tripping over the original fuel tank and fuel neck assembly (which I replaced with aftermarket parts).  This tank is not useable in its current form; on top of the extensive cleaning required to remove the crud 'n rust from the innards, there are a couple spots where rust has eaten entire holes through the tank.  They aren't very big, but still render the tank unusable :)

 

So you guessed it, my question is:  What does this community recommend I do with this (and future) replaced part(s)?

 

From what I've found, '46 parts, part dimensions, part diagrams, etc. are quite difficult to locate.  I'm hesitant to dispose of this tank, thinking I'd be losing a piece of history; somebody somewhere might want it for documentation purposes...?
 
Thanks in advance for your input!

 

large.56f60d10bb4dd_(2016-03-25)OldFuelTank-Removed.jpg.543a257d0cc3685736270a85c9b7260c.jpg

 

 

Save everything! Make your children deal with it when you are gone! 

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If you think tripping over old unusable parts is bad, I'll let you in on a secret. Some guys have bunches of new parts for their cars that they never got around to putting on.

 

Yep. Really. Imagine that.

  • Like 6

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I would keep it.  And when I had a spare $$ I'd send it out to be fixed.  If I sold the car then I'd sell it with the car.  But till then, anything can happen.  And having an unobtanium part on the shelf is priceless.

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You can always acid wash it and TIG weld the holes up. That way it's usable and a possible future investment to the next person that needs it, or even yourself if you wanted to be 100% correct in the restoration. 

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Watch a few episodes of Hoarders. It is a good feeling to sit there and think "Boy! I would sure do something before I got that bad."

 

Think about the guy who has an old fan belt in his trunk. He put a new one on because he was concerned the old one might break. But saved the old one in case the new one broke. I bet he has at least one windshield wiper back there, too.

 

I still remember being in my mid-20's and having a garage I had rented for a couple of years. It was really hard to throw out that first clutter part, the second was easier. When I was done is was exhilarating.

 

Last year I put a full set of rough 1948 Lincoln Continental fenders out at the curb. The smart guys would have spent the 50 cents in a couple of days. I wonder who's garage they are hanging in now.

Bernie

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UNTIL the car is done and on the road, reliably, I'd suggest you keep it all and THEN have a sale . . . "Car done, don't need any more!"  I also concur with Beemon, somebody can weld/braze the perforations closed and then you can get it recoated to original specs.  There CAN be a market for these things already "Renew"ed.  Just charge to ensure your costs are covered!  

 

I had a whole bunch of J14Y Champion spark plugs from some of our cars, which I'd changed.  Seems they work GREAT in Briggs & Stratton lawnmower engines.  Before I figured it was ethanol'd fuel causing the carb issues, I went through a good many of them and cleaned the rest.  Belts and hoses are always good for patterns and sizes.

 

IF you're tripping over anything, your storage containers needs revisiting.  Line the walls, but don't "carpet" the floor.

 

Purges are necessary, from time to time.

 

NTX5467

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I know a guy who just cuts them open, sandblasts inside and out, welds them back together, paints then done. Just like new tank. I have yet to do one that way, sounds like a lot of work, but saves unobtainium parts.

 

I do clean around holes and solder copper patches over them. They last for years. 

 

One must weigh the cost of storing not used spare parts over buying them again. Not a one answer for all situations. 

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