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Post a picture of your father or grandfathers car..


nick8086
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Wish I could.  I have no photos of my grandfather's cars (my mother refuses to share old photos with the rest of the family). 

 

I know he owned the following (brand new): 

 

1940 Chevrolet

1947 Oldsmobile

1949 Lincoln

1950 Lincoln

1955 Mercury

1956 Mercury

1959 Mercury

1965 Chevrolet

1969 Pontiac

1973 Pontiac

1974 Pontiac

 

He owned several used cars in the 1930s and owned a service truck for his auto/truck/marine radiator business (late 1930s through early 1960s). 

 

 

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My Grandfather Dameron never owned an automobile and as far as I know never drove.  My Grandfather Rosser at one time owned a Dodge sedan but I never saw it.  He probably owned it in the 1920's and had stopped driving long before I was born.  In 1941 Dad bought a 1931 Ford Model A pickup to carry mail in.  I was almost two years old then.  He also owned two Chevrolet touring cars built in '21 and '22, and several Chevrolet trucks built in the '30's.  Two of his dump trucks burnt up before I was born and when I came into the world he owned a '33 Chevrolet flatbed and a '35 Chevrolet dump truck.  His vow was that he would not buy any vehicles built after WWII because the metal in them was too thin and he would not buy a vehicle with an 8-cylinder engine because they burned too much gas  However, he finally did buy a V-8 and two vehicles built after the war.

 

About 1951 he added a 1931 Ford A Fordor to his fleet and in 1953 a 1934 Chevrolet 4-door sedan.  Probably also in 1953 he bought a '37 Chevrolet pickup and retired the Model A pickup.  I spent two days in a body shop sanding that pickup so it could get a new paint job.   At 14 years of age I decided sanding vehicles was hard work.  While I was going to college in 1957 he bought a '41 Chevrolet coupe with a hole in the block from a thrown rod.  Shortly after that he bought a '51 Studebaker log truck.  In the next  few years he also bought a '39 Chevrolet 2-door for the kids to wear out, a '41 Chevrolet 2-door sedan, and a 1941 Ford pickup with the V-8 engine that burnt too much gas.  For a long time it was his favorite vehicle and no one else was allowed to drive it.  Then some time later but still in the fifties our neighbor had a head-on collision on a one-lane road with a girl who had just learned to drive.  Dad bought his wrecked '49 Chevrolet Fleetline and put the frontend clip of a 1950 Chevrolet on it.  That would be the last vehicle Dad bought.  Unfortunately I did not have a camera during those years and it never occurred to anyone else in the family to take a photo of a vehicle.  The first camera I bought was a Kodak for the price of $10.00.  The photos of the '37 pickup were taken with that camera and the photo of the 1949 Fleetline was taken with my first 35mm camera.  The photo of the Model A pickup shows me and my three brothers the day we took it out of storage in 2009.  I am the guy in the white shirt.  The second photo of the '37 pickup shows it on the mail route after a snowdrift was opened on the dirt road.  Some of the hazards of carrying mail on a dirt road was snow and ice in the winter and ruts when the frozen ground started to thaw.  Wood trucks and school buses made the ruts and the mail truck had to negotiate them.  My sisters would put me behind the wheel to drive over the ruts and I'd drive on the ridges between them.  This was without Dad's knowledge because he did not want me to ever drive.  The third photo shows my baby brother bugging my oldest sister at a picnic.  He loved to pick on her.

1937 Chevrolet.jpg

1937 Chevrolet pickup about 1960.jpg

1949 Chevrolet.jpg

1931 Ford A pickup Earlehurst VA 103.jpg

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Nice pictures, great story as well.  They say a picture is worth a thousand words but in these cases the words are just as important.

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Dad & his brother offering 'Babe Sitting 16 & over' with grandpa's car in the background.  Mom's 1967 Chevy II with dad's Pontiac wagon in the street.

 

Dad's 1960 Ford Sunliner convertible, 1969 Pontiac wagon and 1968 Cadillac Deville. 

 

He also owned a 1966 Pontiac Bonneville convertible, 1972 Cutlass, 1976 Cutlass, 1978 Cutlass, 1983 Seville Elegante, 1976 Corvette.  Pics of most of those are somewhere else on my laptop. No pics of his 1956 Ford with Tbird engine - still have the emblem off the car & a copy of dad's driving record - lost his license and girlfriend (mom) had to drive the Sunliner home from the dealer. 

 

Cars we don't want to discuss are those my mom influenced him to buy - 1973 Hornet Coupe & 1980 Olds Omega.  YUK!!!!

Babe Sitting Free 16 or over.jpg

Jan 28 1967 The big blizzard - a repeat of the blizzard of 1.jpg

Kathy & her tricycle 1966.jpg

June 28 Field Day 69 Set offa Truck!.jpg

Lisa Jean #10 5-6-74.jpg

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My Dad circa 1945/47 with his late 30's Chrysler Royal ('37/38/39?), getting some help out of a sticky predicament. Not sure what bumper is from, He was a mechanic and typically bought 5-6 year old cars, rebuilt their mechanicals and drove them for years. Living in a rural area, there was little reason to worry about the exterior cosmetics, as mud and dust usually obscured everything! 

WillardandCarcirca1945.jpg

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12 minutes ago, Gunsmoke said:

My Dad circa 1945/47 with his late 30's Chrysler Royal ('37/38/39?), getting some help out of a sticky predicament. Not sure what bumper is from, He was a mechanic and typically bought 5-6 year old cars, rebuilt their mechanicals and drove them for years. Living in a rural area, there was little reason to worry about the exterior cosmetics, as mud and dust usually obscured everything! 

WillardandCarcirca1945.jpg

1937.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I'll have to do some digging for something of my Grandfather's.  He wasn't' a car person.  They were just a tool to him.  I did just get his 1950's Simplicity walk behind tractor from my sister who was happy someone in the family wanted it.  It's in really good shape.  I have to pull the gas tank,  as it's all cruddy inside.  It will run off auxiliary fuel supply.  It came with the blower attachment, chains a definitely non OSEA approved brush hog and some crazy saw attachment which is crazy sharp.  The tooth went right through my glove when I picked it up the wrong way. . 

I was fortunate enough to pick up a sickle bar attachment for it,  in nice enough condition it looks like it came with it off craigslist.  I was probably the only guy to call on it, in the month they had it listed.  

I hope to get it running to keep the front field cleared.  I know it's a bear to handle without it running.  I think that blower is also pretty heavy and it should be better balanced with the sickle bar on it.  

I should go to a tractor show with it and enter it in a preservation class.  It's never been repainted.  I guess you would call it a barn find. 

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Dad.thumb.jpg.d463d09d016a752ae9e08714aa627823.jpg

This was the car my father had when he married my mother in 1938.  He didn't chop the top, he bought it that way.  He said it was yellow and they named it "The Rabbit".  Both parents seamed to have great affection for this car that he drove to graduate school.

Somewhere I have a very faded picture of my mother's father's first car, a 1911 Ford  Model T Roadster that he bought new with a mother in In Law seat when he married my maternal grandmother.  Picture is to faded to reproduce.

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On ‎6‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 6:45 PM, auburnseeker said:

I'll have to do some digging for something of my Grandfather's.  He wasn't' a car person.  They were just a tool to him.  I did just get his 1950's Simplicity walk behind tractor from my sister who was happy someone in the family wanted it.

Seeing freakin garden stuff instead of staying "on topic" od CARS, brightened my already bright day...oh, that;s right the DAY here, is actually really grey skies, and wet grass from rain...lol

 

 

anyways yiour off topic is why I need not even woryy when I got on the thread to post a pic of my Mom...well my birth Mom, not the Monm that filled her shoes when the birth Mom died of Cancer in about 1954, and I can't remember her at all...but I know it was not her fault that she "left" me all alone that moment...  :)  I am not sad today, I am happy to be starting a NEW day!  I should be getting to the hardware store that opened 16 minutes ago, to get some "quiet" grinding flap discs to finish grinding a few eelds on a 24 year old guys 34 truck that will be picked up at noon-ish.  The quiet discs are so I will not disturb my nioce neighbors...in case they are still resting :)

 

I did misread this title last week or so, I thought it said "grandfathers car" I missed the FATHER car

 

here also is my Dad, born 1915 passed away at same age as me at 65 earth years.  He had a very hard life after Mom died.  He never spoke of here, except this:  "The doctors said there was no hope for her, but I still mortgaged my home, my car shop and food take out snack bar, and tried to save her".  That is it, never any other word of "Mom".  :)  it does not matter "that was all".  I am not sad!

 

I assume the car is his, but as he was a lifer mechanic, it might not be his...a 37-38 car?  It matters not.  He is smiling so who cares!  I never knew who took this or that it was ever taken, till I got hooked up with a like aged female cousin that lived but 3 miles away, and I NEVER knew it.   She said her Dad, was a hobby photographer, and it was he who took this pic...just doing what HE loved. 

 

I wondered where it was?  I can only guess, that because it is an old farm?  and was taken by an in-law or going to be an in'law, it must be at the birth home of my birth Mom!...or if not, I still smile at my assumption,  Eliington CT.

 

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All our experiences in life mean "something", just as a random comment years ago on a forgotten AACA thread... Auburnseeker said that " My Cord does not run (yet), but I get such great joy when I first enter my shop each day and love to see that it is the first thing I see,......  I like seeing it each time, ........and I simply don't care (right then) that it does NOT run.

 

That is likely not a direct word quote, but that IS what he was Implying!  That gave me yet one more piece that lead to full understanding of "everything",,,,, very, very recently!! And I am blessed to have read that post..or should I say was able to stumble on those thoughts he felt needed saying!!  Thank You Auburnseeker!  Rock on, my friend!!

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Well I didn't think I was too far off topic.  It's the one mechanical gas powered thing I got from my grandfather.  Unfortunately he didn't have a car to leave me.  I think he would be happy to see me "driving it or it dragging me around the field behind it,  knowing it didn't just get sold off or scrapped.  I got the gas tank soaking now.  Should be about done today.  I'll be able to see what's left of the insides. 

To keep it more car related.  Here is a picture of my Dad a couple of years ago in the 1949 Mercury My wife and I bought him when he was 71.  It was the same type of car (his first) his Dad gave him when he turned 17 except his was black.  Same 1949 Mercury Bone stock 2 door coupe. 

 

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10 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

Well I didn't think I was too far off topic.  It's the one mechanical gas powered thing I got from my grandfather.  Unfortunately he didn't have a car to leave me.  I think he would be happy to see me "driving it or it dragging me around the field behind it,  knowing it didn't just get sold off or scrapped.  I got the gas tank soaking now.  Should be about done today.  I'll be able to see what's left of the insides. 

To keep it more car related.  Here is a picture of my Dad a couple of years ago in the 1949 Mercury My wife and I bought him when he was 71.  It was the same type of car (his first) his Dad gave him when he turned 17 except his was black.  Same 1949 Mercury Bone stock 2 door coupe. 

 

IMG_0549.JPG

A beauty of a Merc. Never understood a chopped Merc, with such fine factory lines.

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5948cb24da7f1_MMandhisModelTT.thumb.jpg.c12d3a3965a0cb11e60a33b5c36c3f74.jpg

My Mom's dad ,who passed away before I was born, with his Model TT work truck in Vancouver,BC . I think that is a dump box on the back

I'm not sure whose goat that was.

He arrived in Canada in 1910 and eventually ended up in Alberta where he and his brother tried to make a go of pig farming. When that didn't pan out, they decided to pack up and drive their Model T to Vancouver, BC in around 1924.

I do not know if this is the same vehicle but his age in the photo and the age of the Model T sure come close . If I can find the negative, I want to see if the license plate on the back of the cab is BC or Alberta.

In 1960 , my Dad bought a 1924 Model TT wooden C-cab  to restore. We finished that restoration in 2004. The above picture came to light sometime after that which is pretty serendipitous.

I have driven said truck, For the life of me, I do not know how anyone spent 8 hours a day driving one for a living. The noise, heat , lack of visibility and cramped quarters would drive me insane. How one would drive such a vehicle 600 miles over the Rockies on 1924 roads is beyond my comprehension. The trip made such a  lasting impression on him that when the the family embarked on a camping trip 30 years later in 1956 he went to great lengths to properly provision the car in the event that they became stranded in the wilderness, especially in anticipation of tackling the dreaded Stevens Pass in Washington State. The story goes that they stopped in a cafe in Washington where he went in to ask how much further to the Pass and . after ascertaining which direction they were going , was advised that he had already gone over it. Amazing how much the highway infrastructure had changed in a short 30 years.

 

 

Edited by bradsan (see edit history)
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The only time I saw him cry other than when he was at a funeral was the day he found out he was getting it.  I had all kinds of ways in my head to present it to him.  Then he just dropped in one day and there it was,  not yet ready for him.  He saw enough to know what it was though. 

That was the one thing he always talked about was if he ever had the chance to get another 49 merc like he had when he was a kid. 

It was nice to give him that chance. 

 

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My grandfathers brand new 34 Dodge.

My dad behind the wheel at age 16 and his brother at age 14. I never met uncle Bill, he was shot down during WWII.

He was an ace and got 13 or 14 before they got him. Another pilot reported that he saw a parachute and was shot while descending.

 

Anyway I remember my dad quoting his dad that they drove the Dodge from Seattle to Detroit and back and "never laid a wrench on it".

Grand dad died when I was 12 or so, he had been paralyzed in a car crash. I have pics standing next to him when I was little but I don't remember him walking.

FJs 34 Dodge.jpg

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16 hours ago, GARY F said:

Nice story and good looking dodge.

 

Thank You,

Dad died a couple of years ago at 97.

He walked 18 holes twice a week until he was in his 80s when the club made the old guys use carts. He kind of lost interest in golf after that. He told me his swing was gone.

I hope to be that lucky. Just don't want to loose my swing. I don't golf.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Here are a few pictures of my Father working on his 1931 Packard  (which I inherited from him in 1996 and still own to today) around 1989 after purchasing it from my great Uncle Al  

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