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Brush engine


oldironlindy
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 I bought this engine at an auction this weekend, I believe it is for a Brush car. I am looking for information on how to date the engine and also want to confirm that the long mounts on the block are aluminum. As you can see they are broke and need repair. I can weld aluminum but son me of the pot metal they used back in the day can be challenging. I also would like to know an approximate value if I get the mounts fixed and get it running. Thanks for any help you can give.

IMG_20170528_094516.jpg

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Nice looking engine. The serial number should be stamped on the top oft the cylinder head near the primer cup. Once located, the engine number sequence can determine the year of production. The broken mounting ears look way to high. Could they have been modified for this frame? Good luck, and if you find a number I can help you with the year.

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Thanks for the reply I was beginning to think that know one looked at this forum, I will get the number tonight. The flywheel is just sitting on the bed of the truck and the engine needs to be lifted up so that the horns meet the mounting bracket. This also has a really cool looking Brass Buffalo carb on it is that the original carb? I think early model T Fords used a similar carb. I will get a couple more pictures too.

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The very early Brush's had their own carb from 1907-08 I believe. The later years used Kingston 5-ball. Not to say that the Buffalo carb was not used, I have not seen it listed in their parts book for models D, E, F, and Liberty. I don't have info on the earlier models A, B, and C. I have a model F (1911-12) and your engine appears to be much earlier. I also have an aluminum crankcase and I have been told that the early engines were cast iron cases. Maybe some other owners will post what they have on earlier models. Good luck. Are you from MN.?

 

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50 minutes ago, carbking said:

Caddyshack - if that parts book you mentioned has illustrations of the Kingston carburetor, I would gladly purchase copies of the page(s) on carburetors.

 

Thanks. Jon.

Hi Jon,

The parts list that I have is a "Price List of Parts" for Brush Runabouts, Models D, E, F, and Liberty. No illustrations of individual parts, just a part number, description, and price back in the day. They do list Kingston in the carb section, but do not designate five-ball, four ball, or other models like the Ford T does. If you want some interesting reading concerning many early carbs with diagrams and descriptions find the book "Practical Treatise on Automobiles" edited by Oscar C. Schmidt, Volume 1, The American Text-book Co., Copyrighted 1909. It is written expressly for the Owner, Chauffeur, Machinist, and Garage Man, Volume 1 has a carburetors and fuel mixtures section pages 287-368 that is full of early (pre 1909) carb info on many makes of autos.  

Thanks, Skip

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Skip - thank you. I have several of the reference books from that era, including one specifically on carburetors by American Text-book. And yes, the information is quite interesting in a general way. Other references from this period that come to mind would include "Carburetors" by Arthur Judge (1912), any of the Dykes Encyclopedia, and the Automobile Encyclopedia sets by American Text-book. There are others. Unfortunately for us today, virtually all of the information in those books comes from magazine articles of the day and patent information. Yes, there are often cut-a-way drawings and a general description of how the carburetor works, but very few actual applications.

 

My Kingston book covers tractors; and virtually all (there are a few exceptions) of the original Kingston drawings in my possession cover tractors, stationary engines, and marine engines. Possibly someone who was a car enthusiast got there before me! The drawings I have skip from Bessemer to Buckeye.

 

As to the Kingston 5-ball; there are at least 3 different Kingston models which use the 5-ball technology: the model 1910, the model 1912, and the model E.

 

I do have a small 4-ball Kingston that has an ancient paper tag labeled "Brush". Have never knowingly had another Brush carburetor, and from your information, this one is probably mis-tagged, which is not unusual.

 

Jon.

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Jon, 

The four-ball could very well be for a Brush. My price list just says Kingston and if the throat size is correct and the time period is correct, anything is possible. I have a Kingston 5-ball with a threaded 1-1/4" connection and hot air pipe. Not sure of exact application, but was told that it was more than likely a stationary engine application.

 

Skip

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