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Jack Placement- '38 Oil Pan Removal


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The title of my post sums up my question. I need to get the car up in the air some so I can fit underneath it to remove the pan. What are the best points to jack from? What should be done as far as the oil pump goes while I'm there or anything else that should be tended to?

 

   Thanks

.           Tyler

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I lift the back by the rear axle pumpkin and then place jack stands under the frame. I lift the front by center of the front crossmember and more jack stands under the each side of the frame. I did nothing with the oil pump when I removed the pan. I just cleaned the sludge out and put a new gasket on and bolted it back up.

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A couple of things that may help dropping and replacing the pan.

When dropping, put a couple of long 5/16 bolts in on opposite sides at the center. That way when you do get all the bolts out the pan will only drop a small amount. Then you can remove those bolts to go the rest of the way - easier to control that way.

 

When putitng  the pan back. Install a couple of lengths of threaded rod in a couple of bolt holes. That will help you line up  the bolt holes and gasket easier.

 

I usually use a small jack to hold the pan up in place when I put the rest of the bolts in. Dont tighten anything until all the bolts are in.

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All good advice.

 

You could also use ramps on the front with the rear jacked up some and on jack stands back in front of the rear wheels. I don't lift the rear enough to take the wheels off the ground, just 2 or 3 inches on the frame which will give you some relief on space underneath as you work the back side of the pan.

 

On my 1940 Super I have to have cyls 1 and 2 in the half up/down position to get the pan out over the front crossmember, you may not have that issue.

 

On reinstall, keep to the torque spec of 10 lb-ft on the bolts or the pan will dimple and you may get oil seepage. If it is already dimpled, a wood block and a 5 lb maul and some shoulder grease will be needed to flatten them all out.

 

Cheers, Dave

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Just completed the same job on my '39 Century.  Placed jack stands only in the front where the suspension bolts to the crossmember.  Removed all the bolts and the pan dropped off.  No need to loosen any steering parts.  Cleaned and painted the pan.  Tied on the gasket through many holes with fine thread, silicone sealer, two long studs to place the pan until the bolts went in.  Put all the bolts in before I tightened it.  Easy.  I had number one rod near TDC.  Good luck, Gary

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Tyler,

DonM and jenz38 are right, the front stabilizer is kind of in the way, and it's not hard to unbolt the brackets and bolt them back up afterward.  Jack up the center of the crossmember, put a jackstand on either side.  Don't have to bother with the rear end.  While you're in there, yeah, take the pickup off the pump (think there's just a cotter pin) and clean out the screen.  Assuming you're just dropping the pan to clean it.

Dan

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If you do pull the pump, it would be wise to also pull the distributor.

When you pull the pump, the entire engine oil system will drain.

When you replace the oil pump, prelube the engine by driving the oil pump shaft via the dristributor hole. Turn the oil pump counter clockwise. that will pump oil through the engine so you wont start the engine with an empty lube system.

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Thank you all for the comments and suggestions.

 

  Ok, so Gary says he had no. One rod at tdc while Dave says one and two should be half way in their cylinders? Is the firing order different between the 320 and 248?

 

  I started out pulling my radiator and getting it re-cored. It has turned into a complete rebuild of the head and now new rings, soft plugs, etc. I guess you guys know how it goes. Thanks again for the help.

 

                           Tyler

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Tyler,

As long as your in the bottom end, check the bottom plate on your oil pump.

It should NOT look like this.

Mine was leaking in several areas around the edge.

I emoried it flat and put a FINE LAYER of Permatex #2 round the edge.

Sure helped with my oil pressure !!!!

100_1225.jpg

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When I did mine the pan did not just fall down after the bolts were out. I had to pry it a little. Mine had never been off before. It was easy to put back on since I used Gasket Cinch on the pan side of the gasket but nothing on the block. 

 

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All right, oil pan falling off was hyperbole.  I had to bang on it too.  Also cleaned the original 34 5/16 nc cap screws and changed the lock washers to new ones.  Cleaned the oil pump and flattened the bottom plate, then using my half inch drill turned the pump until oil was visible at the top of the rocker shaft.  I used a can of sea foam in the new 10 30W oil to help clean the passages.  Unfortunately now I see signs of oil leaking from the rear main seal...  Gary 

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Got the pan off , went well. Do you just take off the two bolts to remove the oil pump? I've got the stuff to rebuild it if need be. Would it be wise to check out the timing chain while I'm in it this far? I'm open to suggestions on anything that should be done while I'm in there and thanks for all the previous helpful hints.

 

          Tyler

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