zipdang

At the grocery store today

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Saw this while out with the wife today. Not a bad way to do your shopping. Any takers on year and make? By their license plate, I'd say it's a '64 but beyond that, I don't know.

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IMG_0888.JPG

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I forgot to mention that when the owner started it and pulled away, it sounded like a diesel. Could it have been? If it was, it was one of the quietest operating diesel cars I've heard.

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18 minutes ago, zipdang said:

I forgot to mention that when the owner started it and pulled away, it sounded like a diesel. Could it have been? If it was, it was one of the quietest operating diesel cars I've heard.

A lot of MB models are diesel. Not sure about this one but someone will know. 

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Guest BillP

Mercedes W111/112 from 1959 to 1968, nicknamed Heckflosse, or Fintail. Has a strong following in Europe as a smooth, quiet and reliable touring car.

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Thanks for the info. I tried to trade him even-up for my 2014 Mazda 3. He politely declined.

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My roommate in the USAF in Germany (1965-67) had a Mercedes 220S (Gas) a little earlier than the one pictured (Before the wilted fins) There were plenty of diesel Mercedes Taxi cabs around at that time, either a cream yellow or black.  All of which were privately owned and operated, detailed as if they were ready for any car show.  I had a 170 VA (4 cylinder, Pre-WWII body style) that had similar style to the 1934 Ford.  There were so many diesel Mercedes that when I came back to the states, I would smell a diesel and think of Germany!

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It could be diesel, as it was first make to start using diesels in passenger cars (1938?), but I don't think, that it was diesel -  those old diesels were all but quiet. The script on a trunk lid should have letter "D" for Diesel at the end. Also, W111 didn't used diesels, which were used only in W110, cheaper series with slightly different front end styling. So, this car surely didn't came out of the factory as a diesel, but it can be diesel now, as swapping engine from gas to diesel was very common.

 

Also, I don't think that Mercedes sold diesels in US before oil crisis; after - even models that were not sold as a diesels in Europe (for example, W123 coupe- in EU unavailable as a diesel).

 

What about the popularity of Mercedes Diesel, about 20 years ago in eastern Europe many people thought that there are ONLY diesels used in Mercedes. In fact, I can't remember if there were any gasoline-powered when I was a child; I also remember, that those cars were so slow, even for the post-communist standards.

 

 

 

Edited by filozof97 (see edit history)

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If the car pictured was a diesel, there would be a "D" after the number on the trunk lid, not a C or S.

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Yes , that is a 220S. The one you want is the 220SE. Those carbs can be painful.  - Carl

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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I had half a dozen of those including twin carb 220S and fuel injection 220SE. The fuel injection model was never sold in north America, mine was privately imported.

 

They were a great car, comfortable, well made, economical and reasonably fast. I wouldn't mind having one today but around here they all rotted away years ago. If you find a good one be prepared to pay through the nose.

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They did make a diesel but it had a shorter hood and single headlights. They came with a 4 cylinder 1900cc or the same size gas engine. If you see the dual headlights it means a 220S six cylinder 2200cc. If you see a big glassed in headlight it means fuel injection, either the 220SE or the 300SE with the 3 liter engine out of the big Mercedes. Now there was a car.

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This is the carburetted, four door sister to my 220se coupe. They do make a hell of a racket on start up, probably why you thought she may be a diesel, but it's just a mechanical symphony to my ears. They are kinda like starting up an old airplane, which makes sense as the fuel injected version was developed from the system first used in Luftwaffe aircraft. You turn the key and let the pump prime for a bit, clear the air out of the steel fuel lines, hit the starter position and hold the key even after it begins to fire up, and after a couple more seconds you can release the key as she settles in to a purr over the next minute or so. The engine sound is remarkably different once it's totally warmed up, just so much character in these, no wonder he refused the trade!

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Early Mercedes mechanical fuel injection oiverview

 

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I love seeing old cars in regular use. A few years ago I parked behind a mid 30's Ford 4 door sedan in the Grocery store parking lot. Made me wish I had my 52 Plymouth with me instead of the old junker Astro

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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3 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

I love seeing old cars in regular use. A few years ago I parked behind a mid 30's Ford 4 door sedan in the Grocery store parking lot. Made me wish I had my 52 Plymouth with me instead of the old junker Astro

 

The very first year I owned my coupe, before I had collector's insurance on her, I decided to drive her daily for a full year in all weather to see her needs, limits and where she excelled. I got more than one stare out in the old Home Depot parking lot. I once had to curl up a 20-ft section of field tile piping and the dude at the supply shop was afraid to help me load it into the trunk, I had to tell him several times, "you're not going to hurt the car." These days she pretty much only stops for gas or ice cream.

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1 hour ago, MarrsCars said:

 

The very first year I owned my coupe, before I had collector's insurance on her, I decided to drive her daily for a full year in all weather to see her needs, limits and where she excelled. I got more than one stare out in the old Home Depot parking lot. I once had to curl up a 20-ft section of field tile piping and the dude at the supply shop was afraid to help me load it into the trunk, I had to tell him several times, "you're not going to hurt the car." These days she pretty much only stops for gas or ice cream.

Funny how that guy thought he would damage the car. At least he was on board with the whole idea of preserving a piece of history. Is there any reason as to why you stopped using it as a daily?

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15 hours ago, Turismo said:

Funny how that guy thought he would damage the car. At least he was on board with the whole idea of preserving a piece of history. Is there any reason as to why you stopped using it as a daily?

 

In truth I would absolutely be using the car for daily use if I didn't get agreed value collector insurance on her a few years back which limits her use. While my policy isn't as strict as many others I still cannot use it for everyday errands. The car is more than capable and reliable enough, handles the curves out on our backroads better than our modern cars, and regular driving keeps everything in good condition as we all know, but I feel much better these days not having to worry about a fender bender. Don;t get me wrong, I still drive the car once or twice a week but usually just open road cruising with food stops to break the monotony.  

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I have a 1967 230s my grandfather bought brand new. In 67 it was cheaper to buy that car have it shipped and drive it back from where it made port than a new Chevy Impala. He documented every gallon of gas. oil change and repair on the car. The car runs and drives like a dream still to this day with 115K miles on it. In fact he drove it to the Hershey meet more than once while he was on the national board. Back in 1983 it wasn't even 20 years old.

Edited by Binger (see edit history)

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