JV Puleo

My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

I spent 3 days in the British National Archives and still didn't finish everything I'd wanted to so I may be forced to come back this year

NOoooo! Extend your ticket and stay longer. You went a long way to do that, so just do it! :rolleyes:

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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Can't... I have to go on another trip as soon as I get back. Thankfully, I have managed to get to the UK every year for the last 25 or 30 years so I know I'll be back.

 

jp

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7 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

Can't... I have to go on another trip as soon as I get back. Thankfully, I have managed to get to the UK every year for the last 25 or 30 years so I know I'll be back.

 

jp

 

After Brexit and they break off from Europe, maybe the ocean currents will carry them closer to the US.  That's how it works, right? ;)

 

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4 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

After Brexit and they break off from Europe, maybe the ocean currents will carry them closer to the US.  That's how it works, right?

It'll be a long ride. The current past Britain goes north, to the Arctic! SW of Ireland some of it breaks off and heads north-west. The south to north flow is the only reason Britain is not sticking out of an iceberg.

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Compared to New England the weather is so mild here... you easily forget the UK is on about the same latitude as Newfoundland.

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If that current reverses, as it has in the past and may do again if the climate changes too much, lots of communities will be in serious trouble.

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I got back last night at precisely 11:00 PM after 21 hours of traveling and (mostly) waiting in airports to find about 18" of snow in my driveway so I had to spend the early morning shoveling it out. When I got to the shop, the aluminum fan I purchased from a fellow forum member was waiting for me. Not having the energy to pick up where I left off I decided to take it apart. Here it is largely dismantled.

 

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I'm very pleased with the fan and it looks as if adapting it to the Mitchell engine won't be terribly difficult. The most challenging part is the flat belt sheave. The Mitchell used an early form of V-belt so I'll have to make a new sheave to replace the one that is currently there. I haven't decided yet how to do that - it's trickier than it looks because the fan won't fit in the lathe - the diameter is just slightly too big so I'll have to come up with a different method.

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Nice looking three blade fan.  I bet you really appreciate that everyone has been hoping for snow and boy did you get the reward!

Al

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Posted (edited)

Not to make you more miserable Joe, I’m over here in Dartmouth MA, about 35-40 miles as the crow flies from you but I’m right on the coast. I got about 3” of slush that I basically squee-geed off my driveway. Even a mile further north and away from the coast got a few inches more than me. My wife always complains that our summers aren’t warm soon enough because of the ocean being so close so I always remind her how fortunate we are in the winter because of ocean keeping the temps up enough for rain instead of snow. Of course, every once in a while a big nor-easter has to go and screw that up by dumping feet on us!

     Now, back to the actual topic, don’t you hate how it seems no matter how big of swing or length of bed on our tools that we have, we always seem to come up with an important project that’s ALWAYS too big!! Fan does look good.

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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Joe,

 

It's great to see a post from you again. I've been missing your posts. Hope your UK trip was reasonably successful.

 

How old is the fan? It looks in very good condition.

 

Mike

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Posted (edited)

 

I had one of my best research trips ever, despite not being able to finish.

I'm still a bit at loose ends but I did do work on the oil pump. Unfortunately, I left the camera in the office so I didn't get photos of making the vanes. They are just pieces of 5/8" x 5/16" flat stock, cut to length. I milled them down slightly and then surface ground them to fit the slots in the pump rotor. This went smoothly... the vanes are just a tiny bit tighter than I want but that can be addressed when all of the other machine work is done. Being slightly tight is good for machining purposes.

 

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The next step was to drill and tap the rotor for the set screws that will hold it to the camshaft. Easy enough, but I made an error and drilled it for fine thread 5/16 set screws rather than coarse thread. The hole is slightly too big and rather than mess it up going still bigger I'll have to get a tap and some set screws to fit the hole.

 

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I was going to make a fixture to finish the OD of the vanes but it occurred to me that I could use the rotor itself. I drilled and tapped holes for 1/4-20 set screws to secure the vanes in each of the slots. When it is done, these holes will be empty and will serve to direct a little more oil to the vanes. by machining all the pieces together I'll get a greater degree of accuracy than I am likely to achieve doing the parts separately.

 

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And... here is the original fan. It looks better in this photo than it really is. Several of the blades have been bent and straightened. It would probably serve as it is but I'm planning to make a true honeycomb radiator and I confess to being a bit paranoid about a blade coming off or bending. I had that happen once on a Volvo. The blade hit something, made a 90-degree bend and sawed a perfectly round hole through the center of the core. It wasn't a problem to fix because I was working for a Volvo dealer at the time but I'd rather it didn't happen to a radiator I'll likely have 3 months work in.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

 

 

I ordered the tap and set screws I need to finish the oil pump rotor and, in the meantime, decided to make the banjo bolt that will attach the oil line to the oil filter. The first step was to drill a hole in a piece of 1-1/2" hex stock.

 

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Leaving the hex as the head of the bolt, I turned a 1" diameter on the remainder.

 

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Then I slipped on one of the banjo fittings and a fiber washer to calculate how much had to be threaded. This piece is long on both ends so I can trim it to size when everything is assembled.

 

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With that calculation done, I cut the oil groove in the bolt.

 

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And set up the threading tool. The thread is 1"-20. The piece it is going into is slightly more than a 1/4" thick so I should get 5 full turns to tighten the bolt.

 

 

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And this is what it is supposed to look like when completer. I still have to trim the ends, plug the hole and drill oil holes in the bolt but this went more smoothly than I had a right to expect.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I finished the banjo bolt today.

The first step was to drill the oil holes... for this, I used a transfer punch to locate the center, then put the bolt in a square collet block and drilled two 1/4" holes through the bolt so it will have 4 outlets that align with the groove on the inside of the banjo fitting.

 

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I then mounted the piece on an expanding mandrel and cut down the threaded end until it was flush with the inside of the cap.

 

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When that was done, I turned the bolt around and threaded the head 3/8 NPT

 

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and screwed in a 3/8 pipe plug as tight as I could make it.

 

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The bolt was then faced off so the plug was flush with the surface and then drilled and tapped to 1/8" NPT. This will be the connection for the oil pressure gauge.

 

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Here is the finished bolt.

 

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And assembled on the end of the oil filter housing.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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That really looks good. There's just something wonderful about seeing you make those parts to get that "parts car" back on the road.  I know the Mitchell must be happy as it HAD to think it was headed to the scrap yard.   I can't wait to get back on the Metz and start making some parts myself!  I got some good news today... the gentleman that sold me the L-W Chuck Co  Universal dividing head did managed to find the other two index plates.   With this setup I should be able to make a lot of gears and parts, I'm pretty excited!   It is a huge tool but it does fit on my horizontal mill table. 

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I suspect that when you get back to the Metz you'll find that your whole outlook on it will have changed... from where do I get "X" to how do I make "X" or "how do I turn Y into X". It is liberating...albeit not less work.

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Joe you are spot on when it comes to working thru issues and resolving problems that would make some repairs impossible for others who do not like to do.....

Al

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You may have noticed that the caps I made for the oil filter housing are a bit thick. This was to allow for slots to take a hook spanner. The idea is to hand tighten it then snug it up with a spanner. For this, I set it up on the fixture I used to knurl the caps.

 

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Then cut 6 slots, 60-degrees apart.

 

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Nearly the last step on the oil filter holder was making the threaded bushing that screws into the cap. The end in the cap will be soldered in place and it will thread into a bushing that will be soldered into the oil manifold. That way, the oil filter unit will simply screw onto the oil manifold.

 

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With that done, I went back to the new pump rotor. The first step was to turn it to size with the vanes locked in place.

 

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I don't have a reliable way of measuring the exact diameter I needed so, when I got close, I took it down .005 at a time and tried it in the pump.

 

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With the diameter fixed, I surface ground the ends to get the height of the rotor about .002 - .003 less than the height of the pump body.

 

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All that went surprisingly well. The rotor now fits into the pump body with a clearance so small it is practically invisible.

 

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When that was done, I took out the set screws and dislodged the vanes. They were then lapped so that they are a sliding fit in the rotor. I am going to test it without the springs to see if centrifugal force is sufficient to make the pump work. It probably isn't...but drilling the tiny holes for the springs is actually a real challenge for me as I am not really equipped to do fussy, tiny work. I'll do it if I have to, but if it works at low RPM without them I may leave them out - or put the springs in when I'm feeling a little more confident of the result!

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Yup another couple of good days progress for you.  The filter assembly looks nice and so does the pump.  Like, I am not sure slow speed and centrifugal force may not be enough to keep you pump pumping.

Al

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I' inclined to agree with you but there is nothing to lose by trying it first.

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Even with true blue engineers, a bunch of testing is ALWAYS part of the process.  Good for you.

Al

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The spring might be quite difficult. It must go from fully compressed to quite extended as the rotor turns. Is it about a third or more of the vanes will be out of their housing some of the time?

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I am not an engineer by any stretch of the imagination, so please take this with a large grain of salt.  Rather than a coil spring, would it be easier to put some sort of leaf spring under the vanes?

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