JV Puleo

My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

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New England has such great history, and it’s no longer being taught. Along with King Phillips War, we also had the second American Revolution........Shey’s Rebellion. You wonder why we have a Bill of Rights? And a Second Amendment?  Read about how the American Government was pointing heavy artillary and several regiments of infantry at the locals that were being taxed into poverty............

 

And yes, they open fire on the people with cannon.......killing and wounding the locals. Google it and take your time, it’s local history for me, and we still drive on some of the old wagon roads used during the rebellion.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I find the gambrel roof form interesting. I will have to look up the structural form. I am amazed at the longevity of untreated timber cladding there. It lasts maybe 20-30 years here. The UV destroys the oil in the timber and lichen, bacteria and mould take over.

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That isn't much different from the original form of my house which was two rooms with a central chimney and a sleeping loft above. When I was tearing the house apart I found the remnants of the original stairs to the loft - just a hole in the attic floor. There are very few surviving common homes from the early 18th century. Many were built without foundations. The original settlers, coming from England, were not aware of how much the ground moves when it freezes. Ultimately, fieldstone foundations were built. If there is one item we have plenty of, it's rocks. The only original fireplace in my house is in the cellar. It's huge, as they did most of the cooking there. It was cooler in the summer and easier to keep warm in the winter. The outside walls were simply planks with clapboards on the outside and lime plaster on the inside. They were, at best, about 2" thick. Winter must have been brutal. I suspect that it was necessary to keep a fire burning nearly all the time but, they were accustomed to a different time and I doubt they gave much thought to it. As an interesting aside...the word "lumber" actually means "junk" or "trash". That is how it is used in Britain to this day. We use it for wood because, in clearing fields around here, they would get huge piles of tree trunks and branches...

 

Your log cabin was built in essentially the same manner as an early garrison house except that the logs would have been finished on the outside and probably covered with clapboard sheathing. The earliest settlers here rarely built log homes. I don't know why but the common English timber frame with wattle & daub filling the spaces was more common. It wasn't suitable for the climate and I suspect this type of construction persisted because of the extreme amount of labor it took to cut planks from logs. Sawmills were probably the first "industrial" establishments in New England.

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

I find the gambrel roof form interesting. I will have to look up the structural form. I am amazed at the longevity of untreated timber cladding there. It lasts maybe 20-30 years here. The UV destroys the oil in the timber and lichen, bacteria and mould take over.

 

It is red cedar, a common tree around here and much more so then. It is also soft and easy to work as well as being extremely rot-proof.

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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

New England has such great history, and it’s no longer being taught. Along with King Phillips War, we also had the second American Revolution........Shey’s Rebellion. You wonder why we have a Bill of Rights? And a Second Amendment?  Read about how the American Government was pointing heavy artillary and several regiments of infantry at the locals that were being taxed into poverty............

 

And yes, they open fire on the people with cannon.......killing and wounding the locals. Google it and take your time, it’s local history for me, and we still drive on some of the old wagon roads used during the rebellion.

 

The central room of the tavern where Daniel Shay met with his neighbors was sold to a British Antiques dealer in the 1950s. It was reassembled in the American Museum near Bath.

 

https://americanmuseum.org/about-the-museum/history/

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

A garrison house has an overhanging 2nd floor. It's an early 17th-century style. They get the name because in each village one house would be designated the "garrison house". It often had thick walls and the overhang. When attacked, the local people would retreat to the garrison house. The overhang allowed the defenders to fire down at the doors and windows... or such is the lore associated with it. Actually, overhanging 2nd and 3rd stories were common in Europe at the time so I'm not all that convinced. There are a few remaining true garrison houses. One I'm familiar with looks quite conventional but the walls are about 8" thick and made of hewn logs. They would be impossible to penetrate with the weapons available in the 17th century. If you are curious about what NE was like in the period just before my house was built, look up King Philips War...

 

Edit... I think Dartmouth was one of the towns abandoned during King Philips War. Smithfield was... the oldest houses all post-date the war when the town was effectively wiped out. Mine is the 2nd or 3rd oldest house in town. The oldest house is just down the street from me and is the headquarters of the local historical society. Like mine, only part of it is very early.

Joe, Dartmouth actually still has the remnants of a fort or garrison  where people sought refuge during the king Phillip war. They just recently had an archeologist excavate it. It was called the Russel garrison, though it was really just a homestead and not originally fortified, and is now on the national register of historical sites. During the KPW, there were only about 30 homesteads in Dartmouth.

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Ok, this conversation is wetting my history whistle.  It would be nice to meet you all at a local cafe, sit around the table all evening talking history of the area and US, then talk history of Pierce-Arrow (Buffalo area) Locomobile, (Bridgeport area) Mercer (Trenton area) then I guess we could also talk about all those manufacturers that chose to cluster together on the western frontier (Detroit area).  I am sure that I could learn a bunch more than I was taught in US history!  I have plenty of hints to scrounge around on Google and learn some less known history.  Joe, my wife likes the  "Salt Box" design that also is a part early American architecture.  The Salt Box was probably a design that was brought about as families needed more room.  They would add the lean-to portion on the back side  making the shape it is known for.

Edited by alsfarms (see edit history)
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Chistech, you complimented me on my lawn.  Thanks!  Here in the arid west, having a lawn is a labor of love, which I am willing to invest.  Our annual rainfall hovers around 7".  As a result we have to water regularly or no lawn at all, that includes shade trees and any thing else we grow either at the house or on the farm.  No water, no anything!  I get envious of the east where everything is green and things simply grow without encouragement.  But all that green has a price, more humidity and plenty of little biting "no-see-ums".  I guess, I like visiting the east but am OK being a westerner.

Al

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Shays Rebellion: about high taxes in MA. Well, some things never change! Love the area, hate the politics.

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In between all this history stuff, I did get to work on the 2nd cap. The knurl came out a little better this time. This one is drilled and threaded 3/4-16. It will be the that connects to the oil manifold.

 

IMG_1207.thumb.JPG.c769188e279075d59fd03fe57323600d.JPG

 

The two caps are almost done. All that remains is to cut the grooves for a hook spanner. The idea is to tighten them by hand and then give it a final nudge with the spanner just to make sure they are tight.

 

IMG_1208.thumb.JPG.99b5fc06731b4efe2f6fe95e7972b492.JPG

 

The material for the banjo bolt and the vanes also came in but I'm leaving for the UK tomorrow afternoon and I'm not sure I'll even come into the shop. The weather is unseasonably warm so I may take the opportunity to clean the house up a bit... it's always a mess but I'd rather come back to less mess.

 

I'm pleased with these. They are a little heavy but beggars can't be choosers. By pure dumb luck, they fit in the appropriate space perfectly. I'd like to take credit for planning it that way but can't...

 

 

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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That's cool Alan!

Most of the homes in our area are from the 1880's and up. It wasn't until after the Aroostook War of 1838-39 and the

Webster-Ashburton treaty that settlement really got underway up here. In fact just around the corner from my house is

the original site the Fort & Barracks built during that brief war. Like you Alan our town was hit hard by a flood in

1994. The town is right beside the Aroostook River and that year the river backed-up behind a massive ice jam and pretty much

devastated the down-town. The small businesses never fully recovered.

 

 

T.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry Harper (see edit history)

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Hello Joe, How long will you be side tracked by going to England?

Al

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I'll be gone a month but when I get back I have the Baltimore Gun Show so I'm home about one weekend from now until mid-March. I have a lot of work to do in the British National Archives for the book I'm writing - a project that has been going on for 30 years and is finally coming to a conclusion. I am hoping to get over to Norfolk and visit the 1914 Humberete!

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I'm off tomorrow morning to visit the Humberette. This is a first for me...I've never been to that part of England and I've never actually gone to see a car and a friend I met through this forum. It's only ironic that it is on the other side of the Atlantic.

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Hello Joe,  Well have a good time and say hello to Mike for the rest of us here in the USA.

Al

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Well, Joe made it to North Norfolk in England, and here is a photo to prove it.

1191.thumb.jpg.9e69cf88d8a196c86abdcfa94b047e81.jpg

It was great to meet Joe, on the left in the photo, and I really appreciated him travelling the all the way from Cheltenham to Norfolk to visit me and the Humberette. Joe has helped me enormously with his posts on this forum of his machining work. I joked with Joe that this was my first internet date!

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Great picture. But why don't either of you look anything like I was imagining?:lol:

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Mike...I'm on the right in the photo.

Heck, I don't even look like I imagine myself.

 

jp

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When I look at the photo I see wisdom and patience... neither of which surprises me. :)

 

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The two of you live Across the Atlantic from each other yet it looks like you buy your clothes in the same store! 😂

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'Joe, on the left in the photo'. 'Mike...I'm on the right in the photo'

Well Joe, when you were standing next to me and I looked at my boots, with either an R or an L on the toe cap, you were on the side of the L boot!  I could also say that it was a deliberate mistake to test your editing skills. Sorry everyone, Joe is correct, he is the one on the right in the photo - I must have had brain fade when I typed the text.

 

'The two of you live Across the Atlantic from each other yet it looks like you buy your clothes in the same store!'

I don't know about Joe, but over here the 'trendy' store is called the 'Charity Shop'. We were both wearing our best clothes - you want to see our work clothes!

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Hello Joe,

What is the latest on your trip to England?  Have you had any time to think over your next step in the evolution of your Mitchell?

Al

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Hello Al,

I'll be back next week. When I'm back in the shop I'll be revisiting to the oil pump. I want to get the entire oiling system worked out and tested. Then I'll box it up and put it aside while I go on with some other engine parts. I should have an aluminum fan waiting for me when I get back so I've that part to modify to fit the car as well.

 

I spent 3 days in the British National Archives and still didn't finish everything I'd wanted to so I may be forced to come back this year - though that's dependent on whether I can afford it.

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