JV Puleo

My 1910 Mitchell "parts car" project

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Might mention to the city that they failed to prevent the graffiti so maybe they should clean it off. ;)
 

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Good Luck... I'm certain they don't care. I'd be surprised if they even prosecute the graffiti "artists" on the rare occasion they catch one.

My neighbor is a foundry. One of their buildings is covered with "street art" although it isn't really visible from the street. On one occasion, last summer, they caught someone decorating part of their property and called the police. I will say that the policeman that came did threaten to arrest them. The owners of the property said they wouldn't press charges if they cleaned it up. They did it... first calling their parents who came down with cleaning supplies and were extremely apologetic. The mother even came into the shop and apologized to me. I had to send her next door. The father asked the owners of the foundry if they had a really dirty job that needed doing and, if they did, he'd see to it that his son was there the next morning to start. It turns out that the "artist" had just been accepted at college and his parents were concerned that an arrest for vandalism might endanger that. I think they were genuinely embarrassed by the whole thing but I also suspect that wouldn't be the case with most people around here. This is a rough, industrial neighborhood in a down market industrial town... this sort of thing is to be expected. The city making a song and dance about it annoys me as much as the idiots with the spray paint.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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Interesting story, sounds like someone's path might have been changed for the better.  A small turn at an early age can have enormous results years later.   Here's to hoping that young man has a wonderful future. 

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Yes...

Here's more on the manifold project. In order to bore and thread the exhaust flanges after I'd drilled the holes in them, I made this fixture. It's a profligate use of a big piece of aluminum but I had it extra. I think I bought it to remake the sheaves on the front hub and then rescued the first set I'd made.

 

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This allowed me to mount and bore both flanges at the same time.

 

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then thread them...

 

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While I was working on this, my neighbors came over with the new castings for the intake flanges.

 

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With the flanges bored and threaded, I faced them off to the finished 3/8" thickness.

 

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Then mounted them together on the oblong turning fixture...

 

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All this worked well. Here they are after I removed them from the fixture...

 

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The last step was to drill the mounting holes out a little larger, both so they will go on an off more easily and, more importantly, to allow for expansion of the manifold. When it gets hot, the manifold will get slightly longer but the jugs, because they are attached to the crankcase, don't expand with it. Unless there is some "looseness" in the attachment it puts a great deal of stress on the blocks. I'll use spring washers under the bolts (I think Buick did that).

 

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Here they are attached to the jugs...

 

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I finished this up around 3 pm so I went to see if the welder was finished with the elbow. He was... I'd written my phone number down incorrectly. Since I never call it, I've forgotten what it was more than once. The elbow looks really good. I'd told him that I'd like to be able to file the weld flat and from what I see, that is entirely practical.

I also got my piece of exhaust pipe with a 15-degree bend today so I was able to test the alignment with the rest of the engine. I am thinking that I should do the water connections next, just to make sure everything fits around the exhaust pipe. I can still move it an inch away from the engine by remaking the mounting bracket to the exhaust clamp but before I do that, I'll see if things fit as they are.

 

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Wow, that's really coming together!! 

 

The oblong turning fixture is pretty cool but looks a little scary.  Do you turn at normal speeds with that?

 

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I turn everything slow. I've never really learned what speeds are best so I rarely change them. I think this lathe has a top end of about 380rpm and I'm running at the lowest speed.

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45 minutes ago, JV Puleo said:

I turn everything slow. I've never really learned what speeds are best so I rarely change them. I think this lathe has a top end of about 380rpm and I'm running at the lowest speed.

 

One certainly couldn't argue with the results you get!

 

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I suspect the professional machinists would be horrified. Actually, I've been in business most of my life both as an employee and as the owner. The numbers don't always work out in favor of the latest, greatest and fastest machines especially if someone is holding a note on it. I paid cash for all my machines that weren't given to me. If I don't run them for a month, it costs nothing.I'm not convinced there is an advantage to charging $160 per hour and having $100 go to the payment rather than charging $60 per hour (but taking twice as long) and keeping it. A lot of machinists are like the printers I once worked with... skilled craftsmen but not very good at business math.

I avoid doing outside work but when you are the only person around that can or will do it, it is unavoidable at times. In my case, it is only for personal friends ... fellow early car and machine enthusiasts and there aren't many of them in my neighborhood.

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I should add that for this sort of one-off work, it is extremely problematical that CNC type machines are faster. Yes, they are great for production in that they have largely eliminated the fixtures everyone used to make but to suggest that they do a better job is highly questionable. They do the same job differently and are far more adaptable to a computer-literate workforce. LIke milling machines... Bridgeports aren't better than Brown & Sharpe, Kerney & Trecker or Cincinnati but they are a lot cheaper which encouraged every trade school program to buy them leaving us with a workforce only trained to use the cheap machine.

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I bought a piece of 2-1/2 exhaust tube to use to check alignment. There will be a collar similar to the elbow, but straight through, attached to the front jug and it's critical that the two pieces align properly.

 

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In order to be sure they do align properly I have to make the pieces that attach to the flanges identical. Here are the tubes screwed into the flanges.

 

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The first step was to cut down the threaded portion so that it was slightly below the back face of the flange.

 

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Then I calculated the length of the tube. There is a certain amount of guess work here which is why I wanted the mounting bracket that is attached to the crankcase to be adjustable. Here I'm using gauge blocks to set my antique B&S height gauge. I've never developed the skill of reading old fashioned vernier calipers so I do this to avoid making an error. The really critical element is making sure they are the same thus it is important to measure them with the flanges attached.

 

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I scribed a line on one of the tubes, then turned it down to match. Before taking it out of the lathe I set a stop on the bed so that I could turn the other tube to exactly the same length. I actually made an error here and made the tubes about .030 short... but again, because the clamp that holds the down pipe is adjustable this can be accommodated. I was going to have the tubes welded into the flanges but they screw in so perfectly that I will probably leave them as they are. Once in place, there is no way they can unscrew.

 

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The next step with these is to cut a 2-7/8 radius perpendicular to the flange. This is going to require another fixture and it turns out I didn't have the materials so I'm in the inevitable place of waiting for stuff to arrive. In the meantime, I started on the water connections. It wasn't a particular good day today...I made a small error on this also but I'll put the best face on it and use this piece as a template.

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To deal with the inevitable "waiting for stuff to arrive" (in this case, materials for two more fixtures I have to make for the exhaust manifold) I've been plugging away at the water connections. This business of making sweat fittings out of pipe fittings is a PIA, especially as I clearly remember being able to buy bronze sweat Ts and elbows at the local hardware store. But, I've almost worn out my keyboard searching the internet for them so I guess they are no longer available. This piece is the "T" for the front end of the water manifold on the side of the engine.

I set it up in the 4-jaw chuck and indicated it on a piece of 3/4 pipe screwed into the end. Brass pipe is much smoother and more uniform than iron pipe so using it makes the job just a little more accurate. Using the 4-jaw allows me to set one jaw back from the center holding this irregular shape firmly.

 

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It was drilled and reamed .875 - the OD of 3/4 copper. I was a bit surprized that it fit perfectly.

 

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I also got to work on the bronze castings for the replacement intake flanges. The first step was to bore them to 1-1/2" and face one side. Then, using the bore and perpendicular face, I was able to face the other side. I then used the fixtures I'd made to machine the original flanges to mark the holes. In order to drill them out, I had to use a center cutting end mill. This is because I've increased the width of the reinforcing ring around the base of the elbow and the hole passes through the edge. This is something twist drills are not intended for.

 

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You can see the other side here. I really don't like working directly on the mill table... every machine I've had featured a few errors where someone did this and went through. In order to pull it off, I was careful to make certain the end mill came out in one of the T-slots.

 

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With the holes drilled, the pieces went back into the lathe to be faced and the cast surface machined off. The casting 3/4" thick and the finished piece is 1/2" thick. I also counterbored the holes 9/16 x 3/8. This allows me to use the socket head screws you see here. When it is finished it will have either special bolts with a stand-off built-in or 9/16 brass standoffs.

 

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Much to my surprise, I actually finished both of them by the end of the day. These still need to be bored & threaded and the lozenge shape machined. This also gave me another good idea regarding the intake port that I have to enlarge but more on that later.

 

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I'm starting to think you didn't need the parts car, you could've just started with some pictures. :)

 

I feel guilty now for ordering parts for the MG online. ;)

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)

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Well... I can't make the castings – at least not the big ones. I bought a 1910 or thereabouts book on green sand casting once with the thought of making an engine from scratch or, more likely, making the jugs for one since I couldn't see how I could afford to buy an intact car and that job is so demanding that perhaps I could find one under those circumstances. Eventually, I  decided it was beyond me.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

Well... I can't make the castings – at least not the big ones. I bought a 1910 or thereabouts book on green sand casting once with the thought of making an engine from scratch or, more likely, making the jugs for one since I couldn't see how I could afford to buy an intact car and that job is so demanding that perhaps I could find one under those circumstances. Eventually, I  decided it was beyond me.

 

Joe, Given the skill we have seen you display here I am sure pattern making would come easy to you.  Heck, if I can figure it out you certainly can!

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I'm not so sure Terry. Making patterns calls for a kind of almost abstract thinking - I liken it to "thinking inside out". I just can't seem to get the hang of it. It's much like math - which is something I struggle with although I've learned to do the simple stuff. I never even considered a career in anything like engineering because I'm so poor at math.

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13 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

I feel guilty now for ordering parts for the MG online. ;)

 

 

 

Nonsense! You probably want to finish and actually drive the car. My primary goal, if I have one, is to solve all the problems and prove to myself I can do it. I'd like to finish someday but I have nowhere to go and precious few friends to go with. There are no worthwhile local car shows anymore - all 50s, 60s, 70s, and hot rods made unbearable by some idiot DJ playing loud, archaic, pop music. I hated that stuff when it was current so reliving that part of the past isn't enjoyable at all. I don't own a trailer or anything to pull one with for any distance and can't afford a luxury like that in any case. I'll probably just drive it locally although I do entertain the fantasy of taking it to Europe for a summer...

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Joe,  If we are all remotely honest with our selves, we are all in the near same boat.  I also like the challenge, the chase, etc., but I also can dream some fairly good dreams of enjoying a car while driving the dang thing.  I am getting around the corner, however, with the Locomobile project.  What that means for me, is that some of the "other" projects will be sold to finance completion of that automobile.  I realize I will not be doing them all and I certainly will not be living forever!  The other good thing is I will be leaving my wife less of a mess, should I pass on first, if I consolidate my hobby.  Now back to the subject....... I am anxious to see your exhaust manifold complete and mounted.

Al

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So am I. The material for the 2nd fixture arrived Friday just as I was getting ready to leave so I'll be back to the exhaust manifold next week. Right now, I'm stuck at home because my everyday car has a severe coolant leak. When that is taken care of, I'll get back to the shop.

 

jp

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17 hours ago, JV Puleo said:

I'll probably just drive it locally although I do entertain the fantasy of taking it to Europe for a summer...

 

Joe, that's a great dream to have kicking around in the background.

 

Must admit to being a lurker on your thread, and enjoy watching how your brain works. It's solving the puzzles and making and rebuilding parts that make these old cars so appealing to many of us. Keep up the good work.

 

Mick.

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Back to the exhaust manifold... It looks as if I'll be making fixtures this week. There are two I need to complete the manifold so I might as well do them together. Also, when I was trying the replacement intake flanges on the blocks an idea came to me. You'll remember that one of the intake ports is grossly off center. Boring it out is one of those jobs that is a lot easier said than done. I'll only be removing metal on about 1/3 of the radius... the opposite side is actually too big so how do you measure that? I think I've come up with an answer. This is a sacrificial flange made out of aluminum.

 

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By bolting it to the block, I can bore it to the correct diameter, measuring the diameter of the hole to get the proper size but only removing a small amount of metal from the block. The diameter I am going for is the inside diameter of the intake tubing - any larger is just wasted.

 

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I'm also making a pair of clamps to hold the finished manifold should I want to fly cut the faces of the flanges. Also, the tubes that connect to the flange have a wall thickness of 1/4". My idea is to have the welding done and then to bore them out to 1-3/4". That way, the hole will be in perfect alignment with the body of the manifold. To do that, I have to be able to hold something that is round perfectly level and rigid... not an easy thing to do unless you have special clamps. I also have to be able to hold the short tubes rigid while I mill a 2-7/8 radius on the end, perpendicular to the holes in the flange...another operation that looks easy until you try to do it. I'm starting with some 5" x 5" squares of aluminum.

 

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This is the fixture for milling the short tubes. It will clamp down on the tube so I need the holes for the bolts in perfect alignment. The way to do this is to drill them before I bore the piece out and split it, much like the clamp that holds the exhaust pipe firmly to the crankcase.

 

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It is a 5/16 hole. After the center hole is bored and it is split, the top piece gets drilled out for clearance and the lower piece get threaded 3/8-16.

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I spent the entire day on the fixture to mill a radius in the little tubes that connect to the blocks. The first step was to mill a shallow V groove on the center line of 20" hole.

 

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Then I located the center of the big hole and drilled it to make room for the boring bar. I find these reduced shank drill quite useful because they allow me to hold them with a collet. This machine has a limited amount of space between the face of the vertical head and the table so anything that takes up less space is welcome.

 

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Then I used the boring bar to enlarge the hole. This boring head works a charm. It's the 4th one I bought... making the mistake of buying a cheap import first. In the end, it was well worth getting a really good one because the critical aspect of boring is that everything is extremely rigid. Also, it is adjustable in increments of .001 which makes getting a really precise hole that much easier.

 

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I hit it dead on, then enlarged it .004 so that my test piece would slip in.

 

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I then cut the piece in two on the center line of the big hole.

 

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Because the holes for the socket head screws were drilled at the same time, they align perfectly. I faced off both sides - strictly for cosmetic reasons - then drilled the top piece 3/8" and counterbored for the heads of the cap screws. The lower piece was threaded 3/8-16. The last step was drilling and tapping a hole to align the flange.

 

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Here's the finished product. It is used on its side and the big hole is off center to allow space for the cutter to go all the way through the piece. It was 4:58 when I finished and I had other things to do before coming home so I'll tackle actually milling the pieces tomorrow.

 

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Edited by JV Puleo
typo (see edit history)

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This morning I set the fixture up in the mill. The extra stuff you see around the fixture allows me to take it out and put it back in exactly the same place.

 

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Because I have so much work in these, I thought it prudent to experiment with an extra piece of 2" tubing.

 

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It worked perfectly...

 

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fitting the OD of the 2-7/8" pipe.

 

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So, I went ahead and finished the two parts. Here they are bolted up to the blocks.

 

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Unfortunately, I also discovered I'd made a major miscalculation regarding the elbow at the back of the manifold. It looks as if I can't use the part I finished last week... I'll have to rethink this but I do have an alternative idea. The good part is that the alternative will be easier to make and I can reuse the big nut I made so it wasn't a total waste. This happens with jobs like this. Thankfully, not very often but it is part-and-parcel of this type of work. My only regret is the money I spent on welding but at least I found a competant welder and that's worth something to me.

Edited by JV Puleo
incorrect fraction (see edit history)

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Wow that looks great!!

 

Too bad about the part, but yeah, you're right, finding a competent welder is worth more than what you paid him.

 

BTW, I LOVE that Starrett hacksaw.   

 

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)

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