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Neil,

    Maybe some heat with a propane torch when the cover is off, and after soaking would help get cover B off.  I think it is not very thick metal so it should expand without too much heat. 

 

Hugh 

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I have a 1923 6 cylinder transmission for sale if that helps anyone reading this article.

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Hugh

 

I tried to loosen the cover B by tapping lightly with a flat punch around the perimeter where a small gap exists.  I didn't notice any movement so I will apply some penetrating spray before the next attempt.  I also needed a key and will contact Jesser for that.  You have been helpful and I think the stick will be removed the way you explained. The 2 covers will need plating as well so I will eventually get them off.

 

Charlie

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I like this picture that Larry DiBarry sent me because it looks original, and in my opinion, looks like where the nickel plating stopped on the transmission, and shows a nickel plated steering tube.    Hugh

 

DSCF5600.thumb.JPG.be6cff03ff2b69681743cc2a5e0dd8a7.JPGDSCF5584.thumb.JPG.1392b3f073d89d4989784e4563203e35.JPG

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4 hours ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

I like this picture that Larry DiBarry sent me because it looks original, and in my opinion, looks like where the nickel plating stopped on the transmission, and shows a nickel plated steering tube.    Hugh

 

 

That is a great observation Hugh.  And that is one reason I really like it when pictures are shared.  So much detail can be revealed, and a lot can be learned.  I agree with the plated steering tube as original.

 

Additionally, on the dash it can be seen that the choke and carb heat control plate background, should match the gauge background, as shown by this original dash.  This is another detail I have yet to correct on my 54CC as I have to take a gauge face plate to the painter and have the paint matched, to be able to paint the background on the choke/carb plate.  My to-do list is never ending!

 

 

 

DSCF5584.thumb.JPG.1392b3f073d89d4989784e4563203e35.JPG

Edited by 27donb (see edit history)

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These photos I sent Hugh are of a 1928-54 sport roadster. Today I hope to get some good photos of my friends all original 1927-54.

 Stay tuned.

 Larry

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What i found when restoring the geabox in my car, was that "cover b" as identifed earlier was soft soldered on! Therefore to remove the gearstick i had to first heat the cover with an oxy-acetylene torch to melt the solder (ie get it really hot), and then with my other 3 spare hands to lever the cover off whilst keeping the flame directed at the cover.

Once off you can remove the pin to release the gearstick.

Goodluck.

 

David.

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David

 

You are correct.  I removed it however if any solder was used, I saw no evidence of it.  It came off with heat but it is obviously pressed on tightly and I expect the heat expansion allowed it to be removed.  Thanks to all for the various bits of info and expertise.

 

Charlie

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Well, it's been 2 years but the engine has finally been rebuilt and with the attached transmission I am unable to fit the assembly into the space and line it up with the motor attachment points on the chassis.  It appears the transmission is longer that space allows.  When I obtained the transmission, I was told it was for 1925 Master.  As mentioned earlier, the number in the casting is 37846-5.  I would be willing to trade it for the correct tranny but need to confirm the correct number.  Anyone know of a source for this?   

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Posted (edited)

Charlie, 

The 1925 Buick engine is hard bolted (no rubber motor mounts).   On the flywheel housing are 2 large bolts on opposite sides into the frame.  The front is a mount with webbing inside which is mounted to the front cross member.  I would think about moving the torque tube out of the way and installing the motor - with or without the transmission attached - whichever is easier.  The transmission hangs off the back of the flywheel housing.  I would bolt the engine into place ,  then the transmission, and then proceed to lining up the torque tube.  In that order.   It will require unbolting the axle clamps on the ends of the rear leaf springs.

To answer you question - from the big book.

 

37846 is the transmission casting for E-H-K-1921 thru 1924 6 cylinder domestic, 1925 40-45A first 7500 jobs.

181362 is the transmission casting for 1925-1926 Master 6 domestic

 

They changed something in the transmission.  I don't know what.  Odd to see the listing because a 1925 -45A is really just a fixed top version of a 1925 model 45, so I don't see how it would effect the transmission.   I would be inclined to think that the issue may be with installation rather than having the wrong transmission.    Hugh

 

 

 

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Charlie,  I agree with Hugh.  You need to unbolt the rear spring hangers that attach to the rear axle housing so you are able to move the axle and torque tube back. If you remove the rear tires,  you are able to move the rear axle and torque tube further back creating extra room.  This will allow the room to install the engine and gear box.  Then you can move the rear axle and torque tube forward and attach to the gear box.  I place blocks of wood under the wheels so the axle doesn,t  drop down too low.

Edited by ROD W (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, ROD W said:

Charlie,  I agree with Hugh.  You need to unbolt the rear spring hangers that attach to the rear axle housing so you are able to move the axle and torque tube back. If you remove the rear tires,  you are able to move the rear axle and torque tube further back creating extra room.  This will allow the room to install the engine and gear box.  Then you can move the rear axle and torque tube forward and attach to the gear box.  I place blocks of wood under the wheels so the axle doesn,t  drop down too low.

 

Some pictures of when I did this on my 27.  Might be similar enough to help you. 



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316422896_051014buick54ccrearaxleout(8).thumb.JPG.8261d024d1f58849ede0ac9a66eca7e1.JPG

 

1289157219_051014buick54ccrearaxleout(11).thumb.JPG.e57c9307c2d97bd20f9e08ceb75cdd7d.JPG

 

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I had looked into buying a 25 Master last year.  Too much added stuff for me.  Photo of interior confirms the plating.

 

Bob Engle

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