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Making the AACA More Appealing to Young People


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7 hours ago, cahartley said:

Howard Hughes thread

 

EDIT>>>I am suffering from memory loss.  I apologize that I confused Howard with Bill Harrah.

 

disregard this post below;  :(

His name made me recall a very cool story about him chasing 28 Chrysler wire wheels " for himself" at Hershey, back when there was only one small swap field.  He got the childhood nostalgia bug, and wanted to re-create his teenager Model A custom.  That car from his youth had 28 Chrysler wire wheels on it.

 

Howard was apparently a regular at Hershey for years.  As some elders here recall, the first field abutted the back yards of a row of smaller homes, some of which even sold food out of the sheds :) 

 

Howard rented one of these homes as a "Noon rest stop-gathering spot" for all of his friends.  (Just adding these back yard stories for you older guys to reminisce about)

 

Anyways, in a Hughes book, it was said that Howard was good at looking for things, and he was really excited to find a set of the Chrysler wheels at a vendors spot....he later told all his friends "the guy wanted $xx for the set, but I hammered on the seller hard, and got them for just $xx.  I got a chuckle out of that.  Apparently he dressed down, and many people did not recognize him.

 

My story on Hughes, kind of relates to how our ever-changing hobby, relates to "what cars we had when young"?  ...so that relates to the subject of AACA appealing to the newest generation of folks?  New food for "my" thoughts, for sure....I need to change my opinions, it now seems...

 

 

 

Speaking of incognito Celebs at Hershey, in the early 70s, I was walking towards the Stadium grass where the show cars used to be, adjacent to that swap field.   Going though the wide walkway, a extremely "giant fellow" walking alone, passed by me heading to the cars.  It was Jack Palance.  I never knew he was so huge in stature.  wow.  I read somewhere that he was a Packard guy.

 

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Edited by F&J (see edit history)
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There are some advantages we have at AACA that we could better exploit. The antique auto industry is unique in it's scope. Tractors don't hold a candle to antique cars. Clocks  at one time were popular and I don't hear about clock shows ever (I'm sure their are some). The automobile has risen above and outlasted other antique collections. Even the notion of keeping antiques I understand to be fairly modern. When I was in Iraq they told us not to talk about old cars as a hobby because the locals wouldn't understand, old cars were just for poor people. So we are in relatively new territory. Here are some big picture thoughts:

Our cars interact with state highways and modern counterparts to our antiques, and the are subject to regulation. Unlike the hot rod community, we don't currently face much pressure because we are striving to make things as designed. A day will come sooner that hot rods will be illegal than for antique cars.

As I mentioned, I used to be in love with muscle cars in my young 20s. But lets face it: today's cars are outperforming those, and do it much safer too. Cheaper as well. A brand new Mustang GT with 420 HP goes for the lower $30k range. You have to get a pretty special muscle car to just hit that number, and they are not cheap nor as fast or safe or reliable. So antique cars DO compete with modern cars for shopping. However, AACA is about enjoying the historic aspects, and that means we don't really race much. We might think driving a 03 Olds up a hill is good fun, but we should focus on our hobby the pleasures of slow (by modern standards). Driving slow doesn't mean boring. Any car is fun when pushed towards it's limits, and that can be 25 mph or 250 mph. Bringing back the pleasure of touring in some way. Antique cars had a performance advantage for a few years, but that's just not the case anymore. AACA is in a better position than most to take advantage of this.

Cars are cheap! Not all of them. And I'm not rooting for the devaluation of old cars either. But as has been mentioned in post above, you can get alot of car for a few bucks if it's just not popular. When I try to talk my peers into a car I'll ask if they have a favorite. I can nearly always find a very similar model that's unheard of to them for pennies on the dollar of what they've seen in a movie or on the auctions. Bel Air or Impala? How about a Biscayne? Superbee? Try a Coronet. The older stuff is even better! As said, it all looks the same to us (yes, a Buick 55 looks like a Model T to young folks). Once folks are hooked they can gain appreciation for various levels of craftsmanship. We certainly need to stop making restoration about the money. Who gives a darn if I lose ten's of thousands of dollars restoring a 4 door 1954 Ford, what in the world does that have to do with AACA?

 

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3 minutes ago, Frantz said:

We certainly need to stop making restoration about the money. Who gives a darn if I lose ten's of thousands of dollars restoring a 4 door 1954 Ford, what in the world does that have to do with AACA?

 

You just described my thoughts that I lived with for decades.  It never was about money, either going out, or coming back.  In my own case, it was not even just about the car itself, but rather it was also what I liked doing.  I like open body cars, but I never drive with top down, as I don't like being stared at for some reason. I assume that means I don't own a car to show off,... I own it because I like it.

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Mom dropped me off at a local car show in 1961 I was ten years old, and I've been in the hobby ever since. Show cut off date was vehicles made in 1942 or earlier. I have little interest in cars manufactured in my life time with a few exceptions. Nobody was looking to make things easy for me getting into the hobby, I just did it, met some great people along the way. Far more walk by vehicles at shows these days, we don't  need to make the hobby a Wal-Mart parking lot. Bob

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On ‎5‎/‎8‎/‎2017 at 10:37 AM, Frantz said:

This is going to sound absolutely horrible....but what about participation grill plaques? I know all the reasons against this, but the "snowflake" generation I'm part of likes it. From the hobby perspective, even a bad car that is declared for preservation by its owner is good. Plenty of high point cars at one time were hot rods of some sort. It would have not not take away from the winning cars that represent what is right, but a car with a badge and pledge to maintain and correct towards originality might be a little perk.

 

AACA does have a very attractive Mileage Award Program which recognizes those who drive AACA accepted vehicles, so in essence we do have a grille badge which anyone would be proud to put on their car,...even snowflakes ; ) . If you go to the website AACA.ORG click on member info and then click Mileage Award Program on the drop down menu. That will take you to the necessary paperwork to obtain the AACA Mileage Award Badge. Its done on the honor system, but as you reach each driving milestone you can apply to receive additional stars to put on the badge representing how many miles you have driven your AACA acceptable vehicle. It looks like this

 

 

mileage award.jpg

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Just speaking for myself.

Joined AACA in 1987 (30 years ago.)

I am 47 now - so 17 when I joined - there was no youth program just really welcoming, pleasant people from my local Region.

Yes I grew up around cars, my grandparents owned a GM dealership in my town. (That being said if your grandparents had a pet store you may or may not become a dog person. Could have gone either way.)

 

I think the key to this whole issue is the really welcoming, pleasant people part. Rather than running down the next generation for not knowing about, or being able to afford, or not caring enough about what you might think is the 'right' kind of vintage car, listening and sharing go a very long way. I wrote an article for Antique Automobile about all my AACA Mentors a few years back.

 

Looking back - I have been fortunate to also join several single marque clubs also made up of really welcoming, pleasant people, for the most part at least. I've shown cars in DPC,HPOF, class judging and AGNM within AACA. I've also participated in AACA tours and been involved with the AACA Museum. Fortunately I've been able to serve as Region President of 2 different Regions and be an AACA Division Chairman.

 

Oddly with all this behind me I recently attended an AACA car show with my family and when I pulled in with my just 25 year old, pre-registered car the person at the gate asked if I was there for the soccer game! I almost turned around and went home!  C'mon guys we need to be more thoughtful even welcoming or pleasant! That would make AACA more appealing!

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by AC Fuhrman
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I've been interested in cars and trucks longer then I can remember!  While my dad liked them, he didn't know much about them, other then which was the coolest one to have. Then he'd sell it and move on to the next one.  I'm told he had a Chevelle and a Mach 1 Mustang!  My mom could care less about cars! No one in my family can work on their own cars or shows them.  I don't know where I got the bug from, but I've enjoyed the ride so far, and hope to enjoy it for many more years.

 

I run into people all the time who are shocked that I've got my trucks!  Even more shocked that I know something about them... and enjoy having a conversation with me since I can talk the talk :)  

 

So it really doesn't matter if you were raised with cars or raised without cars.  If you like them, you liked them!  There are few I don't like - as a matter of fact, lately I tend to gravitate towards the ugly "who would ever keep that car in such good shape" vehicles.  I'm still in search of my elusive station wagon ;) 

 

 

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On 5/6/2017 at 6:19 PM, F&J said:

Funny that those kids are looking at the T and not the Buick....yes, I know the T is likely idling....but still..

 

I think they are not SO much interested in the T as the fact that the owner is PAYING ATTENTION TO THEM....... :D

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10 hours ago, AC Fuhrman said:

Just speaking for myself.

Joined AACA in 1987 (30 years ago.)

I am 47 now - so 17 when I joined - there was no youth program just really welcoming, pleasant people .

really welcoming, pleasant people

really welcoming, pleasant people,

welcoming or pleasant!

That would make ANY CLUB more appealing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

This, this, this, this and THIS!

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Speaking for myself, and I'm 52, I was raised with cars, then cut off ties with them and at 49 found myself in a situation I never thought I would, liquidating a dozen cars for my father. I didn't even know he still had that many as he was living 2200 miles away. The exposure when I got here to help him, and the necessary fact that I had to learn about what he had (exposure), led me to be re-interested. I will say that it has been a joy but with no exposure all those years, I forgot the passion I had for them. I loved the 30 A and it got the most attention when I hauled it even over the 70 Bronco. 

I agree that exposure is the answer. 

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None of our nephews have any interest in our cars.  One will pull the hood over his head in my 59' GMC if we go through town.  The cards haven't played out right but one of these times I'll be able to pick him up from school in it.  I'm running out of time as he's 15 now, but  he has told me he won't come out of school if I do.  

The other one would like our cars if we have a white Lamborgini with gold wheels.  They watch professional sports and all the crap that goes with it.  The others just don't care.  

 

It's a one kid at a time if they are interested.  All of our other car clubs are hurting for memberships.  The current generation has all the social interaction they need on their phone.  We had to go up town and hang out.  That meant cars and the cool cars are what we wanted.   A lot of kids don't get their license at 16 anymore.  They take the class but it's no big deal when they turn 16 to go to the Secretary of State.  When they finally do get it they are happy with a 4 door honda which I would've been the one pulling the hood over my head in that rice burner.  

 

My wife and her sister spent a lot of time at car shows as kids with their grandpa.  The wife took and the sister could care less.  It's nothing you can force on the kids.  We tried to expose the nephews early and they just don't care.  With us not having kids they would be smart to act interested, but they will end up in museums instead of their hands to sell when we are gone.  

 

It appears to me the AACA is doing the best  for new people in the clubs were in.  The other clubs are one marque style small clubs and the cars are expensive.  This leaves out most young people.

 

Their isn't a good answer.  One kid at a time and when your out and about driving your old cars answer questions and be friendly.   That is what we try to do.   

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29 minutes ago, Janousek said:

None of our nephews have any interest in our cars.  One will pull the hood over his head in my 59' GMC if we go through town.  The cards haven't played out right but one of these times I'll be able to pick him up from school in it.  I'm running out of time as he's 15 now, but  he has told me he won't come out of school if I do.  

The other one would like our cars if we have a white Lamborgini with gold wheels.  They watch professional sports and all the crap that goes with it.  The others just don't care.  

 

It's a one kid at a time if they are interested.  All of our other car clubs are hurting for memberships.  The current generation has all the social interaction they need on their phone.  We had to go up town and hang out.  That meant cars and the cool cars are what we wanted.   A lot of kids don't get their license at 16 anymore.  They take the class but it's no big deal when they turn 16 to go to the Secretary of State.  When they finally do get it they are happy with a 4 door honda which I would've been the one pulling the hood over my head in that rice burner.  

 

My wife and her sister spent a lot of time at car shows as kids with their grandpa.  The wife took and the sister could care less.  It's nothing you can force on the kids.  We tried to expose the nephews early and they just don't care.     

15? There's still hope. At that age my father brought my friend and I to a HS game in the rumble seat of his mint 30 something Buick, in our cheerleading outfits. I hid down where your feet go as we drove though our little town very embarrassed. (My friend wasn't though).  When I was 18 he tried to give me a 65 Ranchero for graduation, "but it has the big engine and the guys will love it", he said. I got a small Pontiac Sunbird instead. Of course I loved his Corvettes. Obviously, now my perspective is very different. In time, hopefully your nephews may come around as I did. 

Edited by victorialynn2 (see edit history)
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17 hours ago, Janousek said:

None of our nephews have any interest in our cars.  One will pull the hood over his head in my 59' GMC if we go through town.  The cards haven't played out right but one of these times I'll be able to pick him up from school in it.  I'm running out of time as he's 15 now, but  he has told me he won't come out of school if I do.

 

If someone, ANYONE, would have given me a ride in a comparably old vehicle in 1965 I'd have had feelings I shouldn't have had........ :wub:

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Now that is an interesting perspective. I did the math on that. I think '59 was 58 years ago. 58 years earlier than '65 would put you in the 1907 time frame. I turned 21 in '65. Hot rods , '30s and '40s Cadillacs , XK 120 and 140 Jags , girls , beer , the usual stuff. But a 1907 ANYTHING on the road , THAT didn't happen. Late '50s , the Judge's son Steve had a friend with a Duesenberg. I didn't get a ride in it. Around 1960 Gil Duffy gave me a ride in his Murphy SJ DCP. I would have gone anywhere , any time in that thing. Sitting tall and proud !   - Carl

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im almost 55 and belong to 2 regions. one has no members my age or younger other was a couple. you can see the list of cars I own. some are over 25 but the oldest is a 1966. when I do to an acca event with my early 70s  most people walk by without looking. I have even received comments about why such cars are allowed at an aaca event. I get the impression most aaca members care nothing of cars made after 1940.

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^^ I agree to a point.  My 85 Riviera gets absolutely NO attention at shows but I enjoy driving it.  The Model A gets moderate attention because it is nearly 90 years old.  The 65 Corvair gets probably more attention than any of my cars. OTOH, as we all get older, so do cars so our kids will most likely like the 70s car when they are our age LOL

 

Bob

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A young person can get in the old car hobby for less than $10,000.  Not a Thunderbird or 57 Chev convertible, but a decent old car.  With room for friends and family.    So the cost is not really too prohibitive.  But if young folks are just not interested in old cars, then price is not the impediment. 

 

 

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Interesting topic. 

I think what's missing for today's youth is the entire culture behind cars in general. If you were a kid anywhere from right after WWII to the '70's you were aware how important "the car" was. From drive-in theaters, pulling a camper, drive-in diners, full service gas stations, building car models as a kid, toy cars, Matchbox, Corgi, Dinky, Tonka, electric slot cars, sexy cars in TV and magazine ads, super cars like James Bond's Aston Martin DB-5, the 1966 Batmobile, the Monkeemobile, Ed Roth, Rat Fink, STP stickers, the music culture behind it as well with the Beach Boys, Jan & Dean, Ronnie and the Daytonas, Drag strips all across America, NASCAR when it had door slammers you could actually recognize, Hot Rod Magazine, Car-toons Magazine, Road & Track, many, many kids first job at the local Chevron station pumping gas, repairing tires and changing oil, cruising, cruising and more cruising. The driveways in my totally average 1960's neighborhood when I was a kid, would show like a collector car show today. At least a dozen high performance cars, and they were owned by "dads".  They drove them to work!

You see? The disconnect comes from an entirely different culture today. None of these things we took for granted exist any more. Younger people are not inundated with the whole mistique of the automobile like we were. For most of them it is merely a mode of transportation,  rather than a statement of who you are. Not dissimilar to a city transit bus. And, when you look at some of the crap they get to choose from today, who can blame them?

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Good Topic with lots of interesting ideas and perspectives. The original suggestion about a Student Class within AACA was initially interesting. As others have pointed out, there are a few questions, concerns and challenges that appear to make that suggestion unviable. Still, out of the box thinking like that and a thoughtful discussion about an idea like this is what forums like this should be used for (among other things). 

 

When it comes to younger people (teens to mid 20s) there is a cross-section of this age group (albeit  smaller than it used to be)  that are into cars. Unfortunately probably 99.8% of them only have one vehicle and a BIG percentage of those cars are either late models (less than 10 years old) or are modified to an extent that they would not meet AACA criteria. I see this all the time at Non AACA events I help with and car cruise-ins I go to. To these owners their cars are a projection/reflection of their lifestyle and personality. A 25 year old, stock car (as it came from the factory) simply will not, ever, appeal to them as it is "old" and "boring".

 

Another thing we need to keep in mind here is that an older car does not have modern safety devices (airbags, ABS brakes, traction control, etc) that newer cars have. Insurance companies slam younger drivers when it comes to insurance rates and in the eyes of insurance companies older vehicles (without safety devices) are less safe and cost them more $$$ when in an accident which they pass along to their customers. For the parents of younger drivers and parents of young children in their 20s to 40s (the other younger people in this discussion we hope become AACA members) owning an older car (daily driver)  can be a financial and safety concern that some will not want to take the risk on. Sadly, I personally have seen the result of modern vehicle vs old vehicle crashes and the old vehicle has ALWAYS lost in those encounters and the drivers and passengers have suffered physical and financial hardship.

 

Others here have a very valid point that there are some sub groups of the car hobby that are growing even in the face of growing indifference by young people to cars in general. Over the last 15+ years I have helped a friend of mine with his brand specific car event. This event has "Stock", "Mild" and "Wild" classes for cars broken down in various models and age groups of vehicles. His event has grown just about EVERY YEAR. Back in the early years I took some of my vehicles which were in the "Stock" class. This event now easily puts more cars on the show field than Fall Hershey's show by a wide margin. Out of the 2000+ cars at this event 99.5%+ would not meet AACA guidelines due to their modifications. My point? There are car enthusiasts out there for a number of auto brands and they want their cars to be anything but "from the factory" stock. How can the AACA compete with that? Hopefully discussions like this might come up with some answers.

 

At last year's AACA Grand National show at Williamsport, PA I did see some very encouraging signs. I spent a good amount of time talking with a few Penn College students about my car, restoring it and finding parts. One of these students has plans to restore a car like mine which is no easy task given the lack of parts availability, Seeing the enthusiasm and passion these students exhibited during our discussion gave me hope that younger generations will continue in the old car hobby when we are gone. Our challenge is to find more young people like this and encourage them.  This begs the questions, Are there other schools like Penn College of Technology (PCT) across the USA that have automotive and restoration programs? Has the AACA sought out these other schools and considered forming relationships with them like the AACA has with PCT? If this is not already being done, maybe it is time for the AACA set up a program to do this? 

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10 hours ago, GregLaR said:

The disconnect comes from an entirely different culture today.

 

That's it in a nutshell.

 

I just came back from having lunch with my Wife in the next county over. We took my '60 Electra. Just the two of us, not an organized event, something we do because I like driving the car.

 

While having lunch I mentioned the forum and this topic. She has seen my hobby activity SINCE I WAS 24. I told her I just did what I liked, owned the cars that impressed me, made close friends with the few people I liked, ignored the others.  Seemed a natural statement to her.

 

My Children have a lot of the same characteristics of us. Reflecting, if I was 24 today I wouldn't do anything different.

 

In 55 years of really liking cars I have one trophy from AACA on my dresser. (My Wife must dust it. I don't recall dust bunnies on it and I don't pick it up and fondle it.) I went to a meet and got a letter asking for 30 or 35 bucks and they would send me the trophy. So I sent it.

 

I grew up without heroes. The earliest person I aspired to be like ran the junkyard north of town. And that was just because of all the cars. I stopped in Tuesday last week and hung out for a while, like I have since 1959.

I spent the decades of my 40's and 50's looking for a person I felt comfortable calling "Mr." , someone as a mentor, I guess. All I found became my friends and the relationship, though good, never met my goal. I talked about that with a friend. He told me I wouldn't find him looking outward. And that brings me back to my Nephews and people like them whom I always encourage to follow what calls them. And they have. (sometimes without their parents full approval.)

 

It is a matching of cultures square cultural pegs in a non-Newtonian cultural peg board

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Like you, Bernie, I also was lucky to some older mentors who became friends.

I'm 65 and all my old mentors are gone....... :(

I have mentored a couple friends but they are in their 40's and 50's.

I'd love to mentor a youngster but it doesn't seem that's going to happen....... :mellow:

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I think, like myself, Other car guys come to appreciate original type cars after years of hot rods or customs.  You lose the taste for them, as you see more and more cars butchered and often never finished.  The ones that are finished just seem to blend into the sea of other customs with few stand outs. Drive an original old car in nice condition (better yet a survivor with just a slight bit of patina so it has that glow to it, not rust and bird poop)  out in the sea of these and you will be surprised the response.  Detroit didn't always get it right,  but I think many more back yard customizers never gave any thought to the overall outcome of what they were building.  Just step back and look at alot of the cars out there for sale.  Wheels to far back in wheel wells,  Paint jobs only the builder could love or even remotely like.  Interiors that just look wrong from any angle. 

Alot of kids coming into cars are being influenced by the TV shows which show more hot rodding than restoring.  Give them a few years to really get immersed in the hobby.  I bet they will atleast have a spot for a nice original car somewhere in their bucket list. 

Almost all my car friends are in their 60's or 70's.  I'm 42.   Hopefully they will be around for a while longer.  

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Took the Judge (3,000 built) out to the Orlando Cars and Coffee. It was the third oldest car there (behind a 67 Camaro that was more restomod and a nice 69 SS396. The other couple of hundred cars were from this century, mostly Mustangs, ricers, a few Mercs, and a couple of exotics. None had any idea the 15x8" Firebird snowflakes were not stock. Did receive a number of flyers and a requests to be at other shows. OTOH when I took my 93 GTP with DOHC6 and Getrag 5 speed (47 built) no-one noticed.

 

Several mentioned "Big Chief's" Judge on Street Outlaws (original was also white but built from a LeMans) which is probably the reason for recognition. "Sic Transeunt Tempora ".

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39 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I think, like myself, Other car guys come to appreciate original type cars after years of hot rods or customs.  You lose the taste for them, as you see more and more cars butchered and often never finished.

 

Woa, hold the phone on the whole modified prewar car thing as butchered or not finished... Not trying to be sassy here at all, but..

 

In  my area of Connecticut, I will drag you around for an eye opening tour of  "never going to be finished original cars"  Many indoors out of the rain, but others rotting away, but at least those outdoor ones got saved from the crusher for a part or two..

 

Hotrodders, streetrodders, ratrodders at least get some old cars back on the road.  The guys who used to restore stock ones are mostly deceased, or too old, or downsizing/relocating to small places.  So, what becomes of the surplus basket cases, or the unwanted mint-body closed car, or the rusted ones?  There is no longer the demand from the original restoration hobby community. Heck, you have collectors on here that are very old, and they don't even have anything from the last century.

 

Members such as Xander take good care of some of the better examples and creates high end, high quality restomods, others like I, mostly do the rough stuff that was ready to be scrapped.  Some get back to stock, some don't...

 

I have a 34 Ford 1.5 ton in my shop now that should be crusher bait by most viewers on this forum, or anyone that sees it in person.  The kid is just trying to get a prewar on the road, and wants this one, as it was once one of the trucks used long ago by his families mega diary farm empire.  He did not even know what year it was, as the radiator shell was gone, and it had an International Truck hood.  I went to ID it last fall in one of their many barns, and it's a 34.  I thought he was choosing the wrong vehicle as it was junk.  He saved $ over the winter, working O/T, plowing snow, etc  and asked my Son if I might be able to at least do lower structure work on the cab so it won't keep falling off.  I said sure, nothing scares me.  He said it's too rough to make it look nice, so he said it can only be a ratrod with rotted door bottoms and rustina finish, because the roof was so destroyed.  I had to get it in my shop with a bucket crawler it was so bad.

 

I went to town on it, with $15 salvage steel tubing and sheet steel from the local recycle yard.  He came over a week later with the doors so I could do the final alignments.  I had already stripped the cab into sections and only the cowl remained on the chassis, then bashed out the roof, then slap hammered it to respectable.  I redid the bad parts of the structural, and he "about chit" when he arrived...it is more solid than new, and built slightly stronger by my design.  He then said the next day, "if I pay more, do you have time to fix the junk doors if I find skins", I said sure.  A rat is now no longer the plan, it will at least look better now that he will do flat black. Restorers could not salvage this truck, nor even get one usable part.

 

Restorers just wont take the typical 1930 project anymore, even if nearly complete, rot free, and straight.  That is the sad fact.  Someone has to save them...or we lose another old car.  It really sucks to see a tattered, but solid barn find that somehow survived for 80-85 years, end up being crushed when the long term owners pass away, and the estate simply must be dispersed.

 

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After seeing what this kid started with, I imagine when he gets it out on the road, some dried up old fart will bash him for the fact it will have a salvaged 350 motor from one of their other farm trucks.  Go watch your precious TV, or get off your butt if you want to save something, or help someone else save one.   P/S I'm old but I'm not dried up.

 

end of rant :) 

 

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1 hour ago, padgett said:

Took the Judge (3,000 built) out to the Orlando Cars and Coffee. It was the third oldest car there (behind a 67 Camaro that was more restomod and a nice 69 SS396. The other couple of hundred cars were from this century, mostly Mustangs, ricers, a few Mercs, and a couple of exotics. None had any idea the 15x8" Firebird snowflakes were not stock. Did receive a number of flyers and a requests to be at other shows. OTOH when I took my 93 GTP with DOHC6 and Getrag 5 speed (47 built) no-one noticed.

 

Several mentioned "Big Chief's" Judge on Street Outlaws (original was also white but built from a LeMans) which is probably the reason for recognition. "Sic Transeunt Tempora ".

Some people wonder why BRASS ERA CARS never show up at events, you just explained why. Bob

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Hard core Model A Ford and AACA types need to keep the "that's wrong", " that's not original" comments to themselves if they want any younger people to have any interest in this hobby. Few people have the funds or desire for a 10+ year trailer queen restoration. Bob

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I'm not talking crusher bait cars but cars that were actually good cars that wouldn't have taken much to get on the road in stock form.  There is a guy around here building a rat rod from an early 60's MG that he found in a barn that was parked when it was less than ten years old.  The car was nice enough,  he took the front clip off and sold it for more than he paid for the car.  Now it's going to get a 32 ford style grille and lots of other rat rod treatment.   From what he was saying,  it's going to be rough and crude,  the way alot of rat rods are.  I'm sure many other nice cars have been butchered in similar fashion.  Now they are custom,  they often appeal to the builder and hopefully the person he tries to sell it to.  

I also didn't say that you can't have a hot rod and appreciate or have an original.  I have an original 32 Ford drag car still in it's original paint from 1958 when it was retired,  and a 32 Ford Highboy Cabriolet I built when i was in my early 20's with every penny I could scrape together from my job and mowing lawns or whatever I had to do to make some cash to pay for the parts to build it. 

  I have and look at mostly bone stock cars now.  It's just the way my appreciation of cars has developed.  I believe Big Daddy Don Garlits did much the same.  After years of drag racing and hot rodding,  he then amassed a wonderful collection of restored Early Ford v8 cars. 

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I'd agree with the above... in fact, I'd go further and say that the heavy over emphasis on cosmetic perfection that seems to dominate all of these
AACA competition-based discussions is a major detriment to the hobby. It isn't just young people who are turned off by it... Its also a major discouragement to anyone contemplating the restoration, or just the reactivation of a mid teens to late 20s car. Personally, I like that period and couldn't care less what anyone else thinks but I'm afraid that a lot of people are influenced by what the "movers and shakers" say (otherwise "fashion" would not exist)... and are discouraged by the general contempt expressed for amateur restorations. If you want new people in the hobby, don't dismiss their efforts out of hand with cracks about less than perfect paint or the fact that they own a "closed car." When I first got into this... back in the early 70s with my 26 Cadillac I heard "when are you going to restore it" and "only open cars are worth having" at nearly every event I went to.... (It was a fantastically well preserved car to, with an interior that was about 90% perfect. The main body had been resprayed in the 50s but the shiny black fenders were probably original.) When I sold it, it went to a gentleman who had been a Spitfire mechanic with the Eagle Squadron and race car mechanic after the war. He didn't give a damn what the "antique auto" world thought either.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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9 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I'm not talking crusher bait cars but carsform.

 

The whole root problem though, is nobody wants the dam cars "that were actually good cars that wouldn't have taken much to get on the road in stock ". 

 

We see this time and again in the peoples posts that got left with a relatives prewar.  Some on here give the same dam spiel to those asking for value or where to place an ad....these AACA people just can't understand that things just aren't what they used to be as far as popularity, or actual real demand.  These AACA people tell the heirs, "oh that is such a nice old sedan, ask $$$ this much"   Ain't going to happen, especially as the one person who actually likes it, lives 2500 miles away, and transport costs and worriment, makes the deal go soft.

 

Case in point; In the AACA Plymouth forum a few weeks back, someone put a C/L link for a 32 Ply PA dual sidemount sedan, dry stored since 1957.  All rust free, looked really sweet. Looked ready for a ride...but.... Motor / trans was out, but came with two engines, many spares.  One member asked if it was a good deal.  I said yes.  One guy with a Ply said, doom and gloom nonsense about parts are tough to find...excuses after excuses.   Man up dammit, if you want the hobby to possibly survive...it's on it's last gasp

 

I checked the ad pics again back then, the ad was refreshed 14 hours ago, as it still had not sold in 2 weeks at the dirt cheap price.  I honestly posted, "it is 45 minutes away, and I might buy it,, get it to run, to flip if it does not sell by then....but I don't need a car right now, as I have a full work schedule".  Eventually the person on here cooled off.  I could then not take it, as just I bought a big collection of  34 LaSalles/and tons of parts.....from a deceased collectors estate!     Is anybody getting the picture that I am painting yet?

 

I'm doing my best to save the last tree in the forest, but just a few people can't do it alone.

 

.

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Okay, after 5 pages of threads, I'm gonna give my 2 cents.

 

First thing is I'm 51, not young and not old.  I was 14 when I bought my first car for $350.00.  I have bought and sold many NICE cars for less than a thousand dollars, some less than $500.00.  The days of hundred dollar cars are long gone, a decent project car will cost well over $5000.00, money young people simply don't have.  So here we go.  Since the 2 national clubs I belong to (and most others I believe) do not require vehicle ownership to be a member. 

 

The next time you are at car show, cruise in, etc and a young person walks up to look at your vehicle, get up and go introduce yourself and shake their hand and start a conversation (ask them what attracted them to your car, do they like that particular model and so on) and if they seem sincere and interested, invite them to your next club meeting or gathering or whatever your club does.  If they come, welcome them and waive their dues for a year or pay for them yourself.  If they stay and become an active member, mentor them.  If they like your particular car, invite them to your house and tech them to work on it, wash it and learn to drive it, and then when the time comes that they can purchase their own, they will have valuable knowledge and not buy a pos.

 

Also I have read many articles from people with cars and no one to leave them to because their children and grandchildren do not want them.  If a young member has taken a liking to your car and you have showed them everything about it,  you now have options when the time comes that you can no longer maintain it.  Sell it or leave it to them and you will know it will be cared for and cherished the way you did.

 

A side note.  When at a car show, cruise in, etc, get up from your lounge chair and talk to young people when they come over and look at your vehicle.  I have personally walked up to a car that caught my attention and said to the person whom I thought would be the owner sitting behind it, "nice car" hopping to start a conversation only to be replied to with "thanks" or a nod or sometimes I get the "go to hell look", like they would rather be somewhere else.  If you car is nice enough to get out and take to a show, talk to people, young or old.  They may have one just like it at home and would like some friendly advice on it.

 

Just invite them to join, car or not.

 

Again, just my 2 cents worth.

 

Tim     

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I'll be 46 next week. No spring pup, but I am head over heals with my 1953 Chrysler Windsor. Fortunately so is my 18 year old son. He has really taken to the car.

Mind you he has $0 invested. However he has been bit hard by the vintage car bug. I suspect he'll be into this stuff for life. He's always been a automobile nut since he could walk.

 

I agree with having a positive infectious attitude when greeting people who show interest in your vintage car. I get waves and thumbs up everywhere I go it seems.

I wave back, smile and blast those tugboat horns. Big grins abound.

 

My son and I recently attended the Viva Las Vegas car show in April. I met some great owners. The experience was very positive. I came home and 4 weeks later finally bought my 

own first vintage car. Yes, we are still in the honeymoon stage but intimidated we are not. I have years of mechanical experience. I think I have what it takes to keep

my old car alive and drivable.

 

Here she is, as I can't seem stop sharing pics:

 

ALlMuoFsp1YsiPMWmWxuXJoZzq_Qb6p6h1ev_0am

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5 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

My son and I recently attended the Viva Las Vegas car show in April. I met some great owners. The experience was very positive. I came home and 4 weeks later finally bought my 

own first vintage car. Yes, we are still in the honeymoon stage but intimidated we are not....

 

Welcome to antique car ownership!

I hope you can make some memories with

the family in your Chrysler.  I'm sure you will.

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7 hours ago, keithb7 said:

I'll be 46 next week. No spring pup, but I am head over heals with my 1953 Chrysler Windsor. Fortunately so is my 18 year old son. He has really taken to the car.

Mind you he has $0 invested. However he has been bit hard by the vintage car bug. I suspect he'll be into this stuff for life. He's always been a automobile nut since he could walk.

 

I agree with having a positive infectious attitude when greeting people who show interest in your vintage car. I get waves and thumbs up everywhere I go it seems.

I wave back, smile and blast those tugboat horns. Big grins abound.

 

My son and I recently attended the Viva Las Vegas car show in April. I met some great owners. The experience was very positive. I came home and 4 weeks later finally bought my 

own first vintage car. Yes, we are still in the honeymoon stage but intimidated we are not. I have years of mechanical experience. I think I have what it takes to keep

my old car alive and drivable.

 

Here she is, as I can't seem stop sharing pics:

 

ALlMuoFsp1YsiPMWmWxuXJoZzq_Qb6p6h1ev_0am

This is a lovely car. The fuzzy dice are the cherry on top of the sundae. Could you possibly send a picture in color? :D

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Just now, keithb7 said:

 

Sure, I love showing the car:

 

 

cZBDY_1llGKhvp_sQwgLNGU3bPMH8Aaas9xTXxoP

 

dQ8cZFYYIY-JTwdwLxZXCAuKREbxV3tq4Ys1WVJh

Lovely, I bet your son is stoked about owning it. Is this gonna be a daily driver for either of you? Does it run well? This is an aspect with 50's cars that I've been curious on.

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It will not be a daily driver. Just a cruiser. However it seeing a fair bit of use since we bought it as the weather has been great.

The car runs well. It's not responsive like a modern car. This one has the L-head six cylinder. It will require some regular maintenance

like point gap setting, brake adjustments etc. It feels more like a tractor engine type power.

 

I am early in the vintage car game however not new to car maintenance, repair or rebuild. I like  50's car looks and simplicity. I like

wrenching and tinkering on cars, trucks, motorcycles, Jet-Skis, whatever. So this car fits the bill nicely. I expect to be working on this

car regularly for as long as I own it. Some for required maintenance, some just for the love of tinkering. She turns a lot of heads in 

town. Its an inviting car. Complete strangers like to approach and ask about it. Talk about it. I like that. The world needs more 

face to face human interaction, and less texting it seems.

Edited by keithb7 (see edit history)
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