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i put on new front disc brakes on my 63 last year. brakes work well but wondering why brake pedal goes down further before engaging than my old brakes did    opgi kit fit perfect

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

           Disc brake calipers displace much more fluid than wheel cylinders do when the brakes are applied so the pedal

has to travel farther. If you add rear disc brakes the pedal goes even lower. The giant brake shoes and drums on the early Riviera

are simply as good as brakes get in my opinion when you combine their stopping power with their miniscule pedal travel. I own

eight cars, seven of which are disc brake cars with 4 of them being 4 wheel disc and then  my 65 Riviera. The Riviera has the best brakes of all of them by far..........it will squat in the road at 70 miles per hour with just the slightest movement of the brake pedal.

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And drum brakes use a primary and secondary shoe system on an anchor pin that provides self energizing. Disc brakes don't do that.

 

Brake lining material has some amount of resilience to provide friction against the braking surface. Over time, 25 or 30 years I notice the volatiles tend to outgas and make the lining harder and less effective. I have replaced old shoes that look like new and made a poor braking car stop very well.

Bernie

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I think a lot of it is due to pedal ratios, and a lesser extent the differences in bore sizes of the master cylinder and calipers compared to factory designed systems.

 

Honestly, I prefer a little more pedal movement. The brakes on newer cars seem too touchy to me.

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               Factory disc brake cars have a pedal ratio designed to compensate for the extra movement required

to  move more fluid for disc brakes. Whenever you hang disc brakes on a drum brake car your pedal is going to drop some.

I've seen this in my shop over and over and over again. I always warn the customer to expect it. Likewise if you hang rear disc brakes on a front disc rear drum car, the pedal will drop some. I've always found that when people hang rear disc brakes on a

front disc rear drum car, the car doesn't stop any better and the pedal is lower.  Everyone I ever did that conversion for was not happy with the result, so I won't do it for anyone anymore.

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12 hours ago, jsgun said:

The brakes on newer cars seem too touchy to me.

 

Grandma O'Brien had that problem with both the brake and gas pedals on her Buicks. The '54 Super, '62 Invicta, and '68 Wildcat all threw a shower of pea gravel and hollowed out stopping spots until she broke them in.

Bernie

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13 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

 

Grandma O'Brien had that problem with both the brake and gas pedals on her Buicks. The '54 Super, '62 Invicta, and '68 Wildcat all threw a shower of pea gravel and hollowed out stopping spots until she broke them in.

Bernie

 

Are you saying I drive like a old woman?

 

...'Cause your're not the first one

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38 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

Didn't read that way to me.

I was joking, a friend of mine that is quite a bit younger says I drive like a old lady because I only do 10mph over the limit.

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