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Electric cars


Restorer32
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You should get more replies in one day here

than you'd get in a year down in the Electric Car section.

Happy to help!

 

I know you asked for the 'Teens, but this one, a 1903 Woods,

is so ornate and noteworthy that I thought people might like to see it.

I've never seen anything like this in person, and wonder whether

any still exist:

 

 

 

 

1903 Woods Truck 2.jpg

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A later manufacturer to enter the market was Milburn ...

 

They were a coach body builder who built electric car bodies for other manufacturers - then entered the market relatively late.

 

A few weeks ago I transported this 1917 Milburn Light Electric Car from a private collector in Ocala, FL

up to Richmond, IN ....

 

 

 

Jim

 

 

file-1--11-.jpg

file-2 (4).jpeg

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We have a customer who wants an electric and would prefer an open car. We are currently looking at a Detroit and a Rauch and Lang. Both are closed cars and we may go for one of them if we can't find an open example. Must be complete and basically solid but needing restoration is ok.

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You probably realize that AACA has a non-geographic

region dedicated to antique electric vehicles:

the National Antique Electric Vehicle Region.

 

I interviewed the president of that region on 

the subject of what it is like to own and operate

an electric vehicle from those decades.  I felt that the

subject would be not only interesting to read, but that it might remove

some of the uncertainties that prospective owners might have

about owning an electric car.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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This is annoying but just a few days ago I ran across an old magazine ad from about 1915 for a low, racy electric roadster. I don't remember where I saw it or even what kind it was except it wasn't one of the common names like Baker or Detroit.

If you wanted an electric roadster bad enough you could build your own. There was a chassis for sale on here with wire wheels.

 

 

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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A lot of marketing for early electric cars was aimed at female buyers so weather protection was an important feature, thus the majority were closed cars.  The Detroit electric seems to have the most survivors still out there.  A few months ago Hemmings Classic Car featured the restoration of a Detroit electric, it was a very interesting read.

 

Terry

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Indeed ....

 

The 1917 Milburn Light Electric had the driver positioned at the left rear seat to operate the tiller controls.

 

The pedals were in front - under fold down seats for two passengers ....

 

Just imagine (4) ladies of the day - maybe with hats - driving around .....

 

 

Jim

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  • 2 years later...

One is for sale now

 

1913 Rauch & Lang Electric Open Roadster

 

1913 Rauch & Lang Electric Open Roadster

 

Location: Wellington, Nevada 89444

 

This 1913 Rauch & Lang Electric Open Roadster is said to have spent time in Briggs Cunningham’s automotive museum in Costa Mesa, California, prior to being sold into another private collection. It was purchased in 1988 by the seller’s father, who used it as a promotional vehicle at his theme park, the Ponderosa Ranch in Incline Village, Nevada. The car has reportedly remained in storage since the theme park closed in 2004. An 80-volt Hertner electric motor powers the rear wheels through a worm drive and draws from 14 six-volt golf cart batteries. This Rauch & Lang roadster is now offered with a charger, spare tires, and a clean Nevada title in the seller’s name.

 

 

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image.png.1d8c4fe69c8069484bc6dcfdabf841ad.pngThe Neal Electric was built in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1897. .. The car was described as electrically driven, with a range of speed from 3 to 12 miles per hour. Only a limited number, possibly four, of these vehicles were made and none survive. The car was displayed at the 1897 Motor Car Exhibition at Crystal Palace.

I'm currently working on a presentation for next year at the AACA Convention in Philadelphia on the cars that were built in Scotland.

Terry

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