Jump to content

Recommended Posts

IMG_0456.thumb.JPG.5d36d674024981dc448a36b02967693c.JPG

This is a laminated window. You can remove the outer piece of glass and not affect the inner glass which is larger in circumference. This is also the piece of glass that is sealed to the inside of the roof.

You can pry the outer glass loose by finding an area that is already somewhat loose. I was fortunate to come up with a hard plastic tool used by windshield replacers. You can use a screwdriver or an ordinary table knife or any other implement that can get into the space between the roof and the outer glass. If you are really careful, you won't hurt the top.  The wider the blade, the less load against the roof. Using the 'tool' gently and very slowly, pry the glass loose. It may take some time, then again from the sound of what you wrote, it may come out very easily

Edited by Hemi Dude (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Hemi..... I tried a hard plastic tool with WD40 squirted around the glass with modeling clay to help retain the fluid and all I achieved was to bend the tool tip. I really hate to try something metallic although I may be forced in that direction. Last fall  I read an article posted on here where someone used a metal reflector, clamp on shop light the size of the porthole glass to soften the adhesive, it then popped off with only a small amount of prying. He neglected to say however, how large of a bulb he used in the light. I am now unable to find that particular post to contact him. Have you heard of this particular procedure?. The same author also had tried placing a  porthole glass sandwich in a home oven and heated it to several hundred degrees and the the two pieces just slid apart. Obviously this would only work if the complete glass assy was removed from the top.

Edited by Degerb
word change (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Guys I'll give it a go next week....A couple of questions Turbo(1 What kind of prying tool did you use to remove the Porthole? (2 Your heating unit appears to be a heat gun... what heat setting did you use?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used my wife's hair drier just don't tell her that ?! I think a heat gun would be fine at a distance maybe 6" away and try to keep from getting to close to the edges. Might damage the paint otherwise. Google search nylon trim pry bar I'm sure those would work geat. Honestly I used a flat blade screwdriver with pretty light pressure. Left a minor amout of paint damage however I'm painting the top for it didn't matter for me. Might be wise to use painters tape around the outside of the glass or atleast between the pry tool and the paint. Good luck! Be very patient with it and whatever you do don't drop it when it comes off. I think I put something on the ground below in case it popped off and I couldn't catch it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this the outer glass(in you hand) or some sort of clear plastic laminate between the two pieces of glass? Most of the TC's i see the port hole window shows signs of delaminating around the edges. Mine is not to bad but it's there and if it can be repaired with out replacing that would be awesome.

IMG_0305.thumb.JPG.e799b6ecfc12dcaeba2c7

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the dirty factory sealant that ls in between the two pieces of glass. I used acetone on the gold decal attached to the inside glass to remove the rest of the corrosion. The laminate is on the outer glass and the sealant should easily peel off of it by hand. Maybe use slight heat if it's not coming easy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea! Success! I finally worked up the courage to try to remove the PortHole window from my 90 TC's hardtop. I used a heat gun and a ground down square shanked screwdriver wrapped with some masking tape as a prybar. Since my heat gun was 1500W I was very careful not to get too near the edge of the glass and the edge of the H/T. It only took less than a couple of minutes for it to loosen. Although in retrospect, due to the fact that I had tried previously using WD40 that possibly might have sped up the softening process. Turbo.... did you have any problem working out the bubbles in the sealant in the center?  Did you seal the edge gap between the glass and the top itself after the install? Thanks to all you guys for giving me the incentive and encouragement to complete this project. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys may or may not be interested, but I don't ever put the outside glass back in place. The inner glass which is adhered to the inside of the roof is sufficient to keep water out and that is all you need.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Degerb- My best advise it to put that gob of silicone directly in the center. Close to golf ball size. When you start pressing the two together you'll have some air bubbles and you just keep pressing around and around. If you get a good grip on it moving the glass in a circular motion helps. Just have to be very patient. You'll get it all worked out. The liquid nails silicone may seem hard to get off the paint when it dries. I used some diluted mineral spirits to get it off with ease then hand wax/polish and your good to go. Don't forget to tap the glass in place while it dries over night.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another idea, though a bit more expensive and you need "special tools", but what about using a clear UV cured adhesive like what it used to fix smart phone screens?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...