Dave Young

I need a hub puller

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I'm looking for a 2-5/8" hub puller for my '28 Chandler so that I can get the back drums off.  Borrow or purchase.  If any body has one, I'm in southern NJ.  I just bought one on EBay that is "about 2-1/2", but I'm not holding much hope of it actually fitting my hubs.  There is a fellow advertising custom made to any size for 200 bucks... but I'd rather spend a lot less than that.  Thanks.

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I made one a few years ago for my A. I used a welding tank cap a 1/4 steel plate to cap it off then slotting it to fit the hub . Then a 1" threaded rod and nut welded to the top to push with.

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38 minutes ago, wilbur said:

I'm looking for a 2-5/8" hub puller for my '28 Chandler so that I can get the back drums off.  Borrow or purchase.  If any body has one, I'm in southern NJ.  I just bought one on EBay that is "about 2-1/2", but I'm not holding much hope of it actually fitting my hubs.  There is a fellow advertising custom made to any size for 200 bucks... but I'd rather spend a lot less than that.  Thanks.

 

If you are talking about George McMurty,  I would vote to spend the $200.00.  He does quality work and is worth the money.  I had him made one for me as I could not find one big enough for my '15 truck.  Worked perfectly.  All you need to do is send him a GOOD hub cap and he will return it with the puller. 

 

Here is a link with his information.  http://customhubpullers.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/custom-hub-puller-instructions.pdf

 

 

 

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You've probably been browsing Ebay but I noticed a couple pullers there that seem to be in the ballpark, in terms of diameter:

 

This one (now on Ebay) is a double sided one, they say that one side is 2-5/8" -- http://www.ebay.com/itm/RARE-HUB-WHEEL-PULLER-DOUBLE-SIDED-1905-1906-1907-1908-1909-1910-1911-1912-/142289159384?vxp=mtr

 

Here's a 2-9/16" (16 threads per inch) one, in an auction just ended.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-SINGLE-ENDED-WOOD-WHEEL-HUB-PULLER-TOOL-2-9-16-16-/311801301743?hash=item4898ce4aef:g:f7sAAOSw4DJYfAsb&vxp=mtr

 

 

 

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I have a 2 5/8 bell shaped wheel puller for $50.00 plus UPS shipping.

If you are interested, I can get the shipping cost.

If it doesn't work, send it back plus a stamped envelope & I will return the $50. 

You can also wait and return it to me at Hershey.

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The puller that screws onto the hub is the best.  Next best is the smaller type that screws onto the axle in place of the nut.  And you strike it with a BIG hammer.  Third choice but one that always worked for me before I found the proper size in the other two kinds.  Unscrew the axle nut until it is flush with the end of the axle.  Have the wheel that you want to pull on the ground with the car's weight on it.  Jack up the opposite wheel.  Hit the nut that is on the end of the axle with a BIG hammer. Don't tap it, that just destroys the nut and maybe the axle threads. Hit it once squarely, with a 5 or 10 pound sledge hammer.

Do a "hub puller" search.  There are 55 topics.  This method is not on the top of the list but it works. Sort of a "farmer fix"

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Glad to hear that McMurty has a good reputation.  If I don't succeed in finding a used one, I will go ahead and send him a hub cap.  I did buy one on EBay last night, but that doesn't mean it's gonna fit.  Huptoy, I'll take you up on your offer if the one that's coming doesn't do it.  I tried the "beat on it" only twice, with a brass chunk as a cushion, but not with having the wheel on the ground and the other side on a jack.  It makes sense.

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Just remember that when you beat that axle with your big hammer, you are putting a big impact load on the wheel bearings. You might have to replace them as a consequence.

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If a puller is used that pulls on the drum and pushes on the axle, How is it that the bearings are being impacted?

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It doesn't unless the user pounds on the centre bolt of the puller, which many advocate.

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Well, after speaking to George McMultry on the phone, I went ahead and ordered a custom made puller.  What an outstanding member of our hobby George is.  We are all very lucky to have men like this willing to keep us moving along on our projects.  George is 82 and is no longer driving, due to failing eyesight.  Yet, he is still willing and able to run his lathe and his machine shop to make parts that we need.  He sells these hub pullers world wide.  I am proud to support his efforts and contribute money to his daily routine.  Made in America by American craftsmen!

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21 minutes ago, wilbur said:

Well, after speaking to George McMultry on the phone, I went ahead and ordered a custom made puller.  What an outstanding member of our hobby George is.  We are all very lucky to have men like this willing to keep us moving along on our projects.  George is 82 and is no longer driving, due to failing eyesight.  Yet, he is still willing and able to run his lathe and his machine shop to make parts that we need.  He sells these hub pullers world wide.  I am proud to support his efforts and contribute money to his daily routine.  Made in America by American craftsmen!

 

IMO, smart move.  If you are going to Chickasha he is usually there and might be able to deliver it to you.

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IMHO anyone buying a collectable car should immediately order an operators manual, a shop manual and parts manual (no matter what they cost) if the vehicle has a semi-floating axle and wood artillery wheels  the very next purchase should be a wheel puller that screws on to the wheel.  If you don't need it right now you will eventually. The third item,  If you have split rims (not multi piece rims) you should get the proper tool to unlock and collapse the rim in order to change a tire.

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Tin Indian.  Could show a picture of those wheel tools?  I did grab a rusted up device at an estate sale a while back that has 3 legs and a screw crank for collapsing split rims, but I don't know how to use it. My Chandler has 6.50x20 tires.  Big boots!  I live on the east coast and have never been to Chickasha.  Maybe someday.

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The collapsing and expanding tool for a 20 inch rim are quite common. Ones to work on a 26 or 27 inch rim are rare. Pictured is one for a Model T Ford which were 23 inch rims for most of the production run and 21 inch for the last two years. Dandy Dave! 

 

596700.jpg 

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Buy tools. They raise your status in the community. Back around 1980 I was the only guy in my clique who owned a pitman arm puller. It is hanging on a pegboard in the garage and I still smile about the popularity it brought.

In more recent years, our local cardiologist showed up in my driveway to borrow a torque wrench. "Ah, Doctors do still make house calls." was the beginning of that conversation.

A local minister owned a 6 volt Studebaker coupe, but was always busy helping people and his battery went dead. He showed up for a charge when he had free time. NO ONE would ever think to look for him at MY place!.

 

Tools are the best. Buy them when you can.

Bernie

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6 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

Buy tools. They raise your status in the community.

 

Tools are the best. Buy them when you can.

Bernie

 

Also buy the best that you can afford.  Cheap tools do not last and will cause untold pain with busted knuckles, and the sort when they break or slip.

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" Cheap tools do not last and will cause untold pain with busted knuckles, and the sort when they break or slip."

 

I still remember the pain of learning which way to use a crescent wrench when I was working on my Model "A" at 12 years old. My knuckles were just scar tissue that first summer - I got a basic socket set and wrenches for Christmas.

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I still have my original S&K socket sets with the prices in them. 

 

The 1/2 inch set was $29.99, 3/8 was $24.99 and the 1/4 set was $18.88. 

 

I had them for about 50+ years and I still have all the original sockets, boxes and ratchets.   They are great tools and lasted well.

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I still have tools my Father gave me. They are the ones with the lawn mower blade marks on them and rust from him picking them up in the wet grass. He bought a nice tool box with a padlock of it right after giving me the tools.

 

I remember going into Sears at age 14 or 15 for a warranty replacement of a 1/2 X 3/8" adapter. The small end was twisted off and the detent ball and spring were hanging out. He acted a little funny but gave me the new one. I didn't even have to tell him I used a Buick toque tube for leverage on the breaker bar, Needed more torque, seemed obvious.

 

There are a couple of places where I have worn or broken tools. A screw driver to grid into an awl, a combination wrench to bend into a 90 degree tool, stuff like that. It, absolutely, never fails that someone will come over to help and they will walk past the obviously good usable tools and dig into a drawer to find one of those broken ones. Then they look at you and ask in, that all too familiar whiny voice "Gee, are all your tools broken?" I think they plant seeds to get those people.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I still have tools my Father gave me. They are the ones with the lawn mower blade marks on them and rust from him picking them up in the wet grass. He bought a nice tool box with a padlock of it right after giving me the tools.

 

I remember going into Sears at age 14 or 15 for a warranty replacement of a 1/2 X 3/8" adapter. The small end was twisted off and the detent ball and spring were hanging out. He acted a little funny but gave me the new one. I didn't even have to tell him I used a Buick toque tube for leverage on the breaker bar, Needed more torque, seemed obvious.

 

There are a couple of places where I have worn or broken tools. A screw driver to grid into an awl, a combination wrench to bend into a 90 degree tool, stuff like that. It, absolutely, never fails that someone will come over to help and they will walk past the obviously good usable tools and dig into a drawer to find one of those broken ones. Then they look at you and ask in, that all too familiar whiny voice "Gee, are all your tools broken?" I think they plant seeds to get those people.

Bernie

Ahhh....I have fond memories of the days when Sears would readily replace USA-made Craftsman brand tools with identical replacements. Unfortunately those days have been slipping away for quite a while, and are nearly gone now. I have several broken Craftsman tools which they cannot/will not replace. Sad. 

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You have to be careful about some of those pullers. I had one get lose and attack my trailer. Quite a grip!

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Saved this off eBay a while back hoping it might help someone. Wished it was a better copy but all I have.

Howard Dennis

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If you demount/mount tires this way you will not have trouble with warping split rims.  Every person with Jaxon wheels or any rim that totally separates at the split should do it this way.  You can also do it like this with a large tire iron or pry bar to move the rim into a spiral.  To put it back you can use a 2x4 reaching across where the folding arms touch the rim and a bottle jack to where the screw leg is pushing.

If your split rim does not total separate then you still need tire irons.

ANYONE WITH A RIM TOOL/JACK  should carry a copy of this page.  After you have done a few you can jack up the car, demount the rim, demount the tire with the flap and tube, replace tire, tube and flap, reassemble the rim, mount the rim on the wheel and lower the car back onto the ground in 15 min.

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