Dynaflash8

Original and Barn Find Cars

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That 35 Buick was a wonderful car Earl, and I'll forever be grateful for you having let us use it on that tour. 

Terry

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

My username says it all ......

 

On my trailer for this trip was a documented one owner 1925 Model T Survivor discovered in Dalton, GA.

 

The other is a 1922 Model T Roadster donated to the MTFCA Museum in Richmond, VA that I picked up 

a few days ago in Slidell, GA.

 

The 1925 Model T is the finest documented original one owner Model T I have transported out of well over

100 Model T vehicles .....

 

I was present when the " Rip Van Winkle " Model T was loaded up in Bakersfield, CA a few years ago,

it ended up in the Steve Ames Collection:

 

Rip Van Winkle Model T

 

I transport a variety of classic & antique vehicles.

 

Hands down are the rusty crusty junky dumpy crappy crumbling testaments to the passing of time .....

 

 

Jim

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

Can we all agree that if an owner decides to repaint or restore a car it should be done as authentically as possible?

 

 

Honestly? ...no.

 

I only say that for my own area here in Eastern Ct.   I live on a very busy State road that surely would be travelled to get to different bigger towns like during car show season..  I never see prewar stock cars go past my home, except the occasional Model A clubs in groups.

 

I see some stock/nice original or restored very late 50s to late 60s, but nothing older. (some of these seem to be daily driven commuters during nice weather months!).  I do see a very, very small amount of prewar old style hotrods and just a couple of prewar streetrods per year.

 

I can only assume that the prewar owners just don't want to drive on a road that averages 48 to 55 MPH and have to deal with tailgating texters?

 

So, I'd rather see more prewars out on the roads again, where they can be appreciated, even if that means some are not 100% authentic.  I don't have a problem with a person changing to more hill pulling power, better gearing or OD transmissions and brakes....if it means the car will finally get driven more.  This must be why I only see late 50s and 60s, because they can handle the modern State roads?

 

The prewar hobby simply died around here, I saw many more back in the 1970s than now.  I also saw more interest from the public back then.  One of my older diehard prewar friends says: "nobody wants this old chit anymore"

.

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5 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Can we all agree that if an owner decides to repaint or restore a car it should be done as authentically as possible?

 

Absolutely. I'm not sure if a 1916 Packard twin six that I used to own would qualify as original based on the standards required by Dynaflash. The car was purchased by my father in 1943 from the original owner and had less than 14,000 miles on it as verified by the log book with every entry since new including gas purchases. The paint was very faded, the only original tires have been relegated to the spare tire holder, and many years ago the lead seal on the generator was broken to adjust the charging. Certainly these changes would disqualify the car as being original; however, it won the Van Sciver award for most original car at the 1946 AACA Devon Fall Meet and is still being shown in it's original condition by the present owner.

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ANYTHING can be restored, the unrestored, original paint Motorcycles and Cars are special. You either understand their uniqueness or you don't. I'm sorry so many cars were ruined with restorations over the last 50 years so a $5.00 bowling trophy with a car on top could be placed on the owners shelf. Bob

 

 

x2         not sure if anyone could really embarrass me......................

 

there is a gentleman many on here might know, who restores Mercers.........including causing the paint to have a crackle finish and the tires rubbed down with mud and straw at shows.............

 
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On 3/1/2017 at 9:29 AM, 60FlatTop said:

From the late 1930's the hobby evolved and became more discerning in the quality and standards for what became accepted as a true "collector car" even a sense of the traditional rose in the hot rod and custom cultures.

What we see in barn finds, survivors, even rat rods and their derivatives is simply a counter culture movement, nothing more. Some are more "in your face" that others. It is people and groups of people seeking individuality, an identity, and making statements to free oneself (or one's group) from the expected. A lot of them are products of society's neutralization through lame media, homogenized education, and a touch of high fructose corn syrup. They have little personality and strive for identity through a logo hat, becoming a fantasy hero, or attracting attention through AGM's. Yes, a crappy looking car is an AGM. One can get heads to turn by driving past in a 100 pint restoration or some totally tired iron. Which group of individualists do you want to follow?

It is what some call managing the people's soft skills.

 

Aren't you glad you put that topic out.

 

It's always the same. You get one really neat individual out there and everyone wants to be an individual just like them.

Bernie

Your posts do take me on a journey, but go easy on the hat thing. Embroidered, leather bill, I give one to every customer. PM me your address, and I will send you one and a shirt. I guess I will go for a walk now, and look for my identity. 

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I went for a drive today, in the Sacramento River Delta, with my buddy in our 1929s.   I drove my original faded paint 1929 Studebaker President and my buddy drove his beautifully restored 1929 Studebaker Dictator.   We both enjoyed ourselves, had fun, and an equally great time despite the vast differences in the quality of our vehicles.

March 2, 2017 Isleton.JPG

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A wonderful old original car in nice condition can only be "unrestored" once. And nice examples of these are many, MANY times more rare than restored cars.

 

For example, take a walk down a row of fairly common wonderful collector cars, like Mustangs or tri-five Chevy's at a big major car show. Nearly every one of them is restored nicely. Shiny paint, shiny chrome, reproduction parts all over them. After a LONG lifetime in this hobby, I must admit that I have seen so many of some of the more common models, that it's sort of getting hard to get terribly excited about many of them. But now and then I will be walking down a row of show cars and see something really really special. Like an early car which was stored away long, long ago with very few miles, in very nice condition. Such a vehicle is really a time capsule. It can be closely examined to see how the original assembly line workers applied body seam filler, or rubber flaps to fender wells, or how they ran spark plug wire looms, or how fasteners were installed, etc, etc, etc.

 

I have owned many, many collector cars, and still own a couple. I have been to major car show events in most areas of our nation. I have ridden in super rare classic cars before I was old enough to drive, and sat in one-off super-rare factory "dream cars." 

 

I don't have any interest in changing the opinion of anyone else. But I can spend all day staring at a beautiful unrestored original car or truck...while enjoying casual glances at many nice restored examples. 

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Can we see a show of hands and your reasoning why this car needs a restoration? Ford spent over 3 million to save it. Bob th?id=OIP.IdAlFaEL1orFFM8bx35CfgEsDM&w=2

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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Old 16 is a treasure.  Gary

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Mark,

 

dont tell your buddy, but I'ld take your car hands down.  It's got "the look".

 

His doesnt.............

 
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+1 Mercer.  Mark that car of yours has a lot of eyeball!!

 

I appreciate both actually, always did but 20 years ago I might have taken the restored car, lately I have been gravitating towards cars like Mark's.  Either of those appeal to me, and can be enjoyed a little differently but all good.

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Interesting Views, Gentlemen.  Here's my personal take; I live alone, pay a mortgage, utilities, and a few other neccessities......I also love cars.  I found my previously loved 49 Buick not running  for very cheap on CL. When I have a little extra cash, I do things like inexpensive interior and mechanical improvements to make her run and stop.  I will not put forth the money to make her "Pretty" because it's just not in the budget.  However I will absolutely enjoy driving her every mile I do, knowing that I made her road worthy, and I will raise my niece to know the beauty of an old unrestored car.  Don't get me wrong, I respect those that put forth the money and time to restore or customize, but I see my boyfriend with these kind of cars sitting in trailers and garages because he doesn't want anything to happen to them so they go undriven.  Instead he drives the '35 Ford Panel Rat Rod because it isn't a pristine paint job and one little flaw will go unnoticed.   The idea of my Buick and many others rotting away in a yard or crushed as scrap makes me depressed.....I think pristine or not the appreciation of these cars needs to be shown for future generations or it will be lost.

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38 minutes ago, WendyDee said:

 Don't get me wrong, I respect those that put forth the money and time to restore or customize, but I see my boyfriend with these kind of cars sitting in trailers and garages because he doesn't want anything to happen to them so they go undriven.  Instead he drives the '35 Ford Panel Rat Rod because it isn't a pristine paint job and one little flaw will go unnoticed.   The idea of my Buick and many others rotting away in a yard or crushed as scrap makes me depressed

 

People here, including myself, have said that younger people don't want the old stuff, or don't know how to fix them up for the road.

 

I just took a job in from a 25 year old guy.  He ended up with a 34 Ford dual wheel truck from the huge farm business family he is part of.  The truck really looked hopeless and falling apart, so he said "rat rod is ok".  He said the crushed/damaged roof and metal rot will not allow something decent to happen.

 

I have been working on the loosey-goosey cab, and I just now unbolted the roof and rear back panel.  Only took an hour fighting rusted bolts, but it will now let me fix all the bent/rotted metal quicker and cheaper.

 

He might just see that there is hope to make it nicer than a rat.

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Good for you Wendy, you are my kind of gal. That Buick will be fun for many years to come. 

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The problem with barn finds is that they are in no way "original". They are in "as found" condition. Most folks who find a car in a barn seem to convince themselves that the car has been in that barn untouched since the original owner parked it there. No one can know the real history of such a car. Are we also asked to assume that the vehicle has not further deteriorated in those decades of storage? Please, call them "as found" but "original" ? I'm not buying it. "Survivor" is a meaningless word.

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Well, not always. I recently purchased a 32 Auburn from the original family with every receipt from new. Including the original bill of sale, loan documentation, oil changes  etc.  

I purchased this car from the little girl sitting on her mothers knee. Leone is now 84. 

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13 hours ago, WendyDee said:

Interesting Views, Gentlemen.  Here's my personal take; I live alone, pay a mortgage, utilities, and a few other neccessities......I also love cars.  I found my previously loved 49 Buick not running  for very cheap on CL. When I have a little extra cash, I do things like inexpensive interior and mechanical improvements to make her run and stop.  I will not put forth the money to make her "Pretty" because it's just not in the budget.  However I will absolutely enjoy driving her every mile I do, knowing that I made her road worthy, and I will raise my niece to know the beauty of an old unrestored car.  Don't get me wrong, I respect those that put forth the money and time to restore or customize, but I see my boyfriend with these kind of cars sitting in trailers and garages because he doesn't want anything to happen to them so they go undriven.  Instead he drives the '35 Ford Panel Rat Rod because it isn't a pristine paint job and one little flaw will go unnoticed.   The idea of my Buick and many others rotting away in a yard or crushed as scrap makes me depressed.....I think pristine or not the appreciation of these cars needs to be shown for future generations or it will be lost.

 

I was told that the best trophy is a set of worn out tires sitting against the wall.  I AGREE!

 

Drive em like you stole them and enjoy the ride as they were designed. No upgrades. All original.  The experience will send you back in time before you know it with images from the past.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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My Grandparents on my Mother's side, the O'Briens moved into town from the farm in 1941. They bought an old mansion with a carriage house for back taxes. I was born in 1948, one of over 20 nieces and nephews. Soon after moving the '36 Chevy from the farm got a home in the dark second bay in with the black Buick in the front spot.

 

She gave me the car when I left the Navy in 1971.

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Like most farm stuff, it was pretty well shot from double duty as a farm truck. I sold it and it eventually got built as a street rod and still around the area.

Years before, when I was 12 or 13, she had given me the 1919 Buick Buzz Saw that was still on the farm. I think my Mom and her stayed up late praying for the buzz saw not to start. "The '36 Chevy", as the whole family called it, was, at least, safer.

Bernie

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