John Loney

1939 Chrysler New Yorker

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1939 Chrysler New Yorker 4 door sedan. All original and complete with numbers matching straight eight engine. This car has been in storage for many years and was last licensed in 1961. It ran and drove when it was stored over 35 years ago but I have not tried to start it. This car is very solid and the only rust through is on the front left fender and part of the trunk. The frame is very solid. This car needs a complete restoration but it's very complete including trim rings, hub caps, all scripts and emblems, tail lights, beveled dash glass, wiper arms, door handles and window cranks  etc, etc. Some of the glass is fine and some requires replacing but it's all flat glass so it's easy and inexpensive to obtain. I have a 1939 Imperial that I have restored so I have contacts for just about everything it will need. I have the original build information from the Chrysler Historic Society and ownership in hand. 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Maybe you could buy the Loney car and dicker with Mr Hot Rod for the twin side mounts? I don't see the appeal of twin side mounts anyway. They don't add to the lines of the car, and they put hundreds of extra pounds on the front wheels making it hard to steer and nose heavy.

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This is the original Chrysler air cleaner. The one for the six cylinder cars was different but this is the correct one for the straight eight cars.

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That comment that twin side mounted spare times in the front fenders  make a car hard to steer is interesting. Really? I have driven many  thousands of miles in  different makes of pre war cars that had both rear and side mounted spare tires and never felt there was any poor/heavy  steering with the spares located in the front fenders. A friend just drove his 1932 Franklin Airman  sedan from the eastern end of long island to California and back, I believe he said it was 7,500 miles total, I will have to ask him if he got fatigued because the spare tires in the front fenders made it hard to steer.  That observation sounds good in theory but in reality? not so sure. Rusty how many miles have you driven cars with rear and side mounted spare tires to make that judgement call? would welcome your observation and comments.

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