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pint4

Trailer for 37 Packard 120

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I am looking to buy a trailer to transport my 37 Packard 120.  Can anyone tell me what size trailer would be best based on their experience hauling a 37 Packard 120?  Length, width, capacity would all be helpful ?

Thanks!

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Your tow vehicle of choice will determine the loaded weight of the trailer you will be able to pull.

 

Depending on the exact model - curb weight should be 3300 to 3900 pounds minimum.

 

Overall length depends on the actual vehicle.

 

That is where you start ......

 

 

Jim

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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I pull  a 3,000 pound car on a 2,000 pound open trailer with an extended cab Chevrolet 1/2 ton (1500).

It pulls acceptable but I would upgrade to a 3/4 ton with an enclosed trailer.

I know someone who pulls a 24 ft enclosed trailer & a 3,000 pound car with a 1/2 ton F-150 Ford without problems.

 

You will be more comfortable pulling a 24 ft closed trailer.

A 20 foot will work but things will be tighter inside.

 

Plan on buying Hold Down Straps.

I run the straps from the floor loops to the axels.

You can also use ones that go around the wheels.

 

Load the car on the trailer, tie it down, and be sure to tow it down the road before you write the check.

 

Edited by huptoy
Car weight corected from 33,000 to 3,000. I have fat fingers, sorry. (see edit history)

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I haul valuable classic cars for a living. I have done over 250 moves, everything from Model A Fords to Duesenberg Js, LOTS of Packards. Like huptoy, I want to grab the axle or the spring shackle.  For a while I worked for this company in Detroit, selling car straps and chains for any kind of hauling. We sold the over-the-tire type and I guess they are OK, but I prefer the type that go right to the chassis.  I agree, get a 24' enclosed trailer, and get one with a battery E-brake and winch in the front.  Have someone experienced show you how to load the trailer for the right amount of tongue weight--that is crucial. Get a truck that can pull it, and stop it. My current favorite are the Dodge Ram Diesel trucks.  

 

Here is a link to the company I worked for, and the strap I really like. You can get cheaper elsewhere, but this difference isn't worth the value of your collector car and the work that went into it. 

 

http://www.truckntow.com/auto-hauler-supply/car-hauler-straps/vulcan-proseries-axle-tie-down-combo-straps-with-snap-hooks.html

 

 

 

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On 2/15/2017 at 2:23 PM, mrpushbutton said:

I haul valuable classic cars for a living. I have done over 250 moves, everything from Model A Fords to Duesenberg Js, LOTS of Packards. Like huptoy, I want to grab the axle or the spring shackle.  For a while I worked for this company in Detroit, selling car straps and chains for any kind of hauling. We sold the over-the-tire type and I guess they are OK, but I prefer the type that go right to the chassis.  

 

http://www.truckntow.com/auto-hauler-supply/car-hauler-straps/vulcan-proseries-axle-tie-down-combo-straps-with-snap-hooks.html

 

 

 

Fastening to the frame or axle is best - great link to transport supplies !

 

I get mine at Summit Racing.

 

 

Jim

 

 

Large.jpg

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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Thanks for some very good advice.  I am leaning toward a Ford F-150 4 door truck with 4WD and a V-8 engine that I could also use as an everyday driver.  I am finding out there are a lot of 24 foot x 8.5 foot trailer options out there.  Must be quite a few manufacturers across the country.  I am estimating the Packard and enclosed trailer are going to weigh in at 8,000#.  I only wish my budget had room for an Aluminum trailer It also sounds like some trailers tow better than others.  I assume it must be the design such as location of axles or just how well it is built such as alignment of all components and suspension.  I would not want the trailer to be bouncing down the road every time it hit an expansion crack or small pothole.  I appreciate the experiences and knowledge being shared by others who have already traveled this road.

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Invest in trailer load bars. They are essentially a spring that connects the chassis of the trailer to the chassis of the pulling vehicle. They make for a good pulling trailer.  Your choice of truck is at about the minimum for pulling a Packard. Yours being a 120 it will do. Wheelbase is the thing--the longer the wheelbase of the two vehicle the better. You will find that a gas V-8 truck will find you making many fuel stops on a long trip.  

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One other thing sometimes overlooked if you are getting an open trailer is the height and location of the wheel coverings.  It is annoying to get the car on the trailer and either not be able to open the door more than an inch or two if you need to reach in or else have the door bottom scrape over the top of the coverings.

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Thanks for the advice regarding the tow vehicle.  As a result I am now looking at a Ford F250 XLT or a GMC 2500.  Gas mileage will be horrible but goes with the territory if I am going to trailer the car.

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A diesel powered truck would be better, but it probably pushes the price up a few thousand dollars. A diesel provides lots of torque (pulling power) and longer driving range.

 

(o[]o)

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