intimeold

Car Hauling Fail

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7 minutes ago, captndan said:

Back the car onto the trailer.  Much safer.

 

Or buy a trailer meant to be a car hauler- ( one with a ramp door). This looks to be a cargo trailer with a set of mickey mouse ramps. Just asking for trouble.

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Yes, wrong trailer.

I like the way the driver gives it some extra gas and spins the rear wheels about half way up the ramps.  I would have thought he would notice the rear end kicking out.  He must have thought he could power through it. LOL.

I think the "Woahh" call was a little late.

 

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2 hours ago, captndan said:

Back the car onto the trailer.  Much safer.

I always load a car with the engine forward.   Agree, Mickey Mouse setup, inexperienced operator.   

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I have a 4,000 Lb. Waren winch to haul the car on to my trailer. To big of a chance of damaging my car seeing how little clearance it has. An expensive mistake verses a cheap winch.

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)
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That's a trailer for a new car reality show, right?  No, not the trailer... a trailer.

 

Why is the Dr. Hook Medicine Band singing "The Cover of the Rolling Stone" in my head???

 

Bernie

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I use ramps all of the time, never had a car fall off. Agree he spun the rear wheels and the usual torque reaction happened. Personally always pull a front engine car on forwards, For me it is easier to load the tongue properly.

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Engine in first for tongue weight on the hitch. So if you load it right you do sway need sway bars or load levelers. Again winch it in to be sure of no damage.

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I had a similar experience that ended without damage. I use to carry my FarmOroad in the back of a pickup truck. I had some homemade wood ramps with the aluminum ends. I took the FarmOroad and my Dad that had had a stroke and used a handicap scooter but could walk a little with a cane, to a large truck show. All went well till I was loading up and didn't think about that I was loading on pavement instead of grass and the bottom of the ramp couldn't dig in. I was almost on when the passenger side ramp kicked out and I was balanced on three wheels, two if I got out. I put on the emergency brake (one wheel at this point). My Father had enough strength to kind of keep the FarmOroad balanced while I got out but didn't have enough strength to either lift up the corner or put the ramp back if I lifted. Two guys were loading a small firetruck close by and I ran over for emergency help, they initially said they would be over in a few minutes when they were done tying down their load till I explained the problem. With two additional able bodies we got the FOR up and the ramp back in place and loaded. Not long after that I bought proper ramps that had better traction and cables to attach so they couldn't kick out.

Picture is loading with new ramps. I now have a 12' enclosed trailer that I use.

FOR_LoadItUp-1.jpg

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Kinda wonder how they got it moved after that happened....

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"Don't tell me that it can't be done" | Lorrie Morgan | 'Watch Me'

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Well at least that is the light end. Come along on the left corner of the trailer roof to lift and slide ? Padding on the one rail that is under the car and jack the ground end of the rail until can slide over ? My ramps have hooks on the ends & can strap to inside.

 

BTW if using a dolly do not rely on over-the-tire harnesses only, have something mounted on the tongue (winch is good) to prevent the Toad from moving back on a turn.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)
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I'm buying a trailer this year and spec'd it out with a full ramp. Why anyone would want any less is beyond me. Of course, I also have a tricycle tractor, so a full ramp is required, but even without that, people being cheap on such things always scares me.

On that FarmORoad above, The new Ford trucks have a neat ramp system that locks in on a bead on the tailgate. Of course trucks have grown 3' taller than they used to be, but the concept is nice for braver than me folks driving quads and Crosleys up into beds. 

How can you call a guy in a safety vest inexperienced!

Edited by Frantz (see edit history)

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Nothing wrong with commercial car trailer ramps .....

 

American Made Aluminum Trailer Ramps

 

Barn doors offer flexibility & full acces to the rear of your trailer - important if you load and unload on occasion

with a forklift or other power equipment.

 

Ramp doors wear out quickly with daily use - loading & unloading is usually done on surfaces that are crowned

or not perfectly level - this can warp a ramp door - most ramp doors are rated at 4000 pounds - that won't stand

up to a heavy vehicle -  these are some of the reasons why I switched to barn doors and commercial ramps.

 

That little video is another reason you should load & unload a vehicle by wireless remote control electric winch.

 

Ever since I started hauling years ago - every vehicle gets put on and put off my trailer by remote control wireless control

electric winch whether it runs or not.

 

No need for a drivers' escape door - no opening or closing doors needed.

 

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

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The video appears to show him putting it in 1st gear of a 4 speed trans.  My assumption is it also has a limited slip rear end.  This works well when one wheel has good traction.  If you have ever tried to drive on snow, you will know to keep your foot out of the throttle.  My guess is the driver wasn't experienced with driving a manual.  At 16, my father required me to release the parking brake slowly and slide the clutch in 1st so the car didn't go forward or backward.   It still hurts to watch the video.

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My 60" x12" ramps (I have multiple uses including a dolly and work with a tandem axle car trailer) have a 1"x1" channel at the end. As long as the channel has something to latch on that can bear the strain you are fine.

 

+1 on using an electric winch, is also good for an additional tie-down that is stronger than most straps.

rampchannel.jpg

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If you look at the first shot of the video before you play it, it looks like the street is wet.  You can see a reflection by the front tire on the ground.  If the tires are wet going up an aluminum ramp, plus adding some juice to it.  That makes for a bad situation. Not enough traction. The tires will spin real easy and it would slide like it's on ice. :o

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On 2/12/2017 at 8:44 PM, Jim Bollman said:

...I used to carry my FarmOroad in the back of a pickup truck. ...

 

So...Crosleys really DO fit in the backs of pickup trucks!

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The original Mustang was light in the rear end. Driving one in snow was a real challenge. My aunt who lived in snow country had my uncle put a heavy hunk of iron in the trunk each year before winter to help get some extra traction when things got slick. This who setup looks like it was an accident waiting to happen. :(

Lew Bachman

1957 Thunderbird Colonial White

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Another cautionary note. I was at a car show when everyone was packing up to leave, and a hot-rodder was driving into a trailer. He'd put 2x10s down on the ground under his ramps, to reduce the angle. But the ramp was still relatively steep and he spun a rear tire. A 6-foot-long board flew 50 feet across the parking lot. It was just luck that it didn't hit someone. If it had, there would have been multiple broken bones or worse, since there were a number of children walking around. You wouldn't believe how fast that board was moving..  

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So if you need boards for a slammed car, pin them to the ramps ?

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