Terry Wiegand

NEED SOME GM TECHNICAL HELP

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This may seem a little off topic for the Buick folks on here, but, it is a General Motors car.  Barbara has a 1993 Chevrolet Geo Metro Hatchback.  This little car has a 61 cubic inch, 3-cylinder engine (my last Harley-Davidson was 61 cubic inches) and right now it is getting about 58 miles per gallon on the highway.  The fuel tank filler tube from the gas cap to the rubber hose has a pin hole leak on the top side from rust out and she found out about it last week when she filled it up.  It started dripping gas on the driveway and getting down on my hands and knees with a flashlight found the problem.  Is there any kind of patch material that can be put over cleaned metal tubing like this that will seal up the leak area?  We have scoured the whole country looking for a replacement for this tube and there are none to be had.  During the looking we found out that there seems to be a cult following for these little cars and people just do not want to give them up.  This little car we have is in very nice condition and we keep it serviced and maintained very well.  I hoping that there will be someone on here that might know something about a fix for this tube.  Thank you guys in advance for any and all help.  If this was an old Buick I'd be all over it and have it fixed the next day.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,

 

Here's a link to some Geo Metros across the country.  Most of these places have a list of "pullers" who'll pull stuff for you.  I would go to some of the local places here in KC but I'm getting ready for some foot surgery.

 

http://row52.com/Search/?Year=&V1=&V2=&V3=&V4=&V5=&V6=&V7=&V8=&V9=&V10=&V11=&V12=&V13=&V14=&V15=&V16=&V17=&LocationId=0&ZipCode=&Distance=50&MakeId=138&ModelId=2026&Page=1&IsVin=false

 

Wouldn't something like JB Weld work?  Or perhaps some of the exhaust repair putty that my step son uses when he's replacing pipes and mufflers and his weld leaves a couple of pin holes.  I guess that you'd just have to read the package to see if it's unaffected by solvents.

 

Ed

 

PS - found this on YouTube.  If you read down through the comments, the repair is still working after two years.

 

 

 

Edited by RivNut
Added the PS (see edit history)

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Ed, we tried all GM dealers nationwide first with no luck.  I then went to LKQ website and believe it or not they did a nationwide search of their facilities with the same result - nothing.  I'm going to talk with a fellow who does muffler and exhaust system work here in Hutchinson and get his thoughts about this too.  I'll post a photo on here of this little car and I think you guys will see why we want to keep it in top condition.  Thanks for the input.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

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Yep Perfect application for JB Weld applied direct. If after cleaning rust off surface, you create larger or multiple pin holes you can cut a small patch slightly larger than the affected area out of a piece of thin galvanized or stainless sheet, form it to contour of neck and JB Weld it in place. If concerned about JB weld oozing into the filler neck through rust holes, lay the patch over the area then apply the JB around perimeter of patch. This should last many years

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In the video that I posted, the guy claims that he tried JB Weld and it continued to seep.  Perhaps he didn't apply it properly.  ???????  I suggested the JB Weld before I watched the video.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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use seal all available  at advance auto parts. It is like old type plastic glue and it goes over rust.

To use it place some on a piece of paper large enough to easily cover the aria.

I have done this numerous times on chevy trucks that have out side of frame fuel tanks.

Al   

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I've successfully used 2-part epoxy to fix leaks in gas tanks and filler necks.  If the hole is larger than a pinhole, you can drill it larger and install an appropriate sheet metal screw, then epoxy over it.  Get it as clean and shiny as possible to start, then paint with a good rust-preventative paint when the epoxy has hardened.  I fixed a similar filler neck issue on my wife's previous car (2001 Century) and it worked perfectly and the MIL light went out, so it held pressure.

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I do not know how much working room you have but was wondering if one could fabricate a rubber sleeve out of radiator hose and secure it with clamps?  It is not like it is going to be seen, right.

 

If there is a cult following for the car, there should be a club and/or forum where you might find others who have dealt with this same problem?

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I want to thank all of you guys for the help and suggestions for what I though might be an easy fix for her little car.  I found out that GM obsoletes some parts after about 7 - 8 years when sales fall below a certain level (this is what the parts people at our local Chevrolet dealership told me).  I took the parts diagram printout to my local muffler/exhaust repair shop and they told me that they would make me one exactly like what I have and I would be back in business in about 2 hours time.  These folks made the new exhaust system for my '22 Buick and it works like a charm.  Again, thank you guys for your help and advice.  I will post a photo of this little car on here tomorrow.  I think everyone will readily see why we want to keep it going.  The stainless steel racing wheel covers make it look like it's doing a 100 MPH just settin' there.

 

Terry Wiegand

Doo Dah Kansas

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As promised, here is a photo of Barbara's little Blue Streak as she calls it.  The stainless wheel covers really make it look sharp we think.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2110198.JPG

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I owned three of those Geo Metros in the 1990's as I was traveling around town every day.  My 1991 was the same blue color as yours.  I thought they were great cars for getting around inexpensively.  I got over 50 MPG with a standard shift.  I remember the first time I ever paid more than $10 to fill one up (10 gallon gas tank).  I put over 200,000 miles on one and I swear I never had any trouble with the 1.0 Liter 3-cylinder engine.  I was hauling computer equipment around at the time so the back seat always stayed down and the hatchback gave it plenty of room and easy access.  I gave my first one to a friend of mine who was going through a divorce and just needed a car.  I got mad when I found out he traded it in for a Firebird two weeks later. If I had know that I would have kept it.  The other two were eventually totaled in accidents that were not my fault.  Great little cars, though.

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Thanks for the picture, Terry!  Glad you got it fixed pretty easily, too.

 

The shape of the car is pretty timeless and the wheel discs do compliment it.  Good to see that it's still at "factory ride height"!

 

NTX5467

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