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Piston for 1923 moon


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If-and that is a big "IF"- you were able to find a piston, it is not going to be a match for your others. It may look and fit the same, but it will most likely not weigh the same or have the same wear patterns. Your result will be a horribly pieced together engine that will sound like a blender with rocks in it. By taking the cheap route, you are also likely to further damage the engine. You owe it to the car to fix it properly. Do yourself and the car a favor by fixing it the right way and buy a set of new pistons. At the end of the day, it will be worth it and you will get your car back on the road PROPERLY. Remember: Do it right or do it twice!!!

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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This is a strange engine as there is virtually no wear on the engine.  I can still see the cross hatch on the cyc walls.   There is virtually no sludge in the engine.  I have not cleaned the engine nor the pistons.  As you can see by the pictures the is no gumming of the rings.  The seating surface on the valves still showed metal and no carbon on the stems.  I plan on weighing the rotating assembly to match all of them up.  I have already gotten the gram scale out and will build it like a racing engine except I will not be blueprinting it.  Since the engine is a low RPM engine the balance is less critical but why not do it right.  The babbit is in great shape with out any flakeing or scratchs.  Even if I get a new piston I will have to match up the weights.  Thanks for everyones suggestion now I need to find a piston

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Napa may not have one on the shelf but can canvass all their locations and warehouses and maybe find one. Maybe a head gasket also. Replacing all may be a good idea. Measure all your bores and pistons for size and roundness, you may find out why the piston failed. I would bet it was honed and re ringed without a rebore and the piston skirt had way too much clearance and slapped.

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)
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You really need four pistons.  Even if you found one that looked original and weighed the right amount could you be sure that the alloy was exactly the same.  Would it expand exactly the same amount at the same rate at the same temperature?  It could mean the difference between running like a sewing machine and galumphing along.  As motoringicons  said  "do it right or do it twice".
 

 

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It might be time to ask what is the plan for this car? Yes If it is to be a high point tourer do it completely. But if the new piston is close in weight, and fit to its manufacturers specifications, there should be little concern. I once bought a Chevy with a 283 punched to a 301 and found out after driving it many miles with no indications (none!) that one cyl. was bored 20 thou. more than all the others with a larger piston.

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)
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Jan,

 

Their may be a modern piston that may fit making it inexpensive to do all of them.   The previous owner of my 1912 McLaughlin - Buick found that V6 Ford Ranger pistons fit fine and have 5 thousand miles on them in over 15 years. Just need to measure see if their is an match. Anyone else had luck with that?

 

Tom Muth

Cncinnati, Ohio

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