Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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1 hour ago, neil morse said:

 

 Heck, we've never seen a mess like that in your workshop, let alone on the dining room table!

 

I wasn't expecting it to be such a mess!  I was surprised  by what came out of those armrests.  I would NEVER allow a mess like that in my garage!

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Thursday March 22, 2018:   T R I A L  R U N  - Installing Rear panel kit / arm rests

 

Odd title, but being Mother Nature dumped another 10" of snow on us last night, and the office was closed, I had an idea:

Being I have the interior kit from LeBaron (although a bad dye lot),  and they do not want it returned,  I decided to put myself through a "trial run" and install the defective panels just so I can learn a few tricks that will help me when the actual kit arrives.

I figured you always do stuff better the second time around, so if I mess up.......  no big deal.   Learn from it and do it better next time.

 

Here goes:

 

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Here's the rear panel kit you get from LeBaron Bonney.  Basically four parts that finish each side before the seats go in.

 

 

Arm Rests:  I covered these the other day.

 

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I got spooked enough that I stripped the fabric, removed the foam arm rest pad that I bought from JoAnns Fabric and replaced it with Dynaliner.

 

 

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I placed the original just to see how it rolls over the edges.

 

 

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Then I cut the Dynaliner (1/2" thick,  dense and self adhesive)  Same stuff I used on my floor over the Dynamat.

 

 

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Stapled it down to create that forward roll

 

 

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And with this material in position, I re-covered the arm rest and now don't have to worry about getting worms.

 

 

Pillar Panel:  

 

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Here's the car as I was dismantling it.  The Passenger side pillar panel has a cutout for the dome light switch.  

 

 

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Before I put the pillar panel in the car, I went through and tightened the door windlace.  My friend let me borrow his pneumatic staple gun and it is far superior to the tacks I was using.

I like when the windlace is nice and straight and butts up nicely to the panels, so a little tug and it looks a lot better.

 

 

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For this, I just used 1/4" staples.  It makes a huge difference in how tight the lace feels now.

 

 

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I traced the back about 1/4" wider than the panel.  This way I can make my first releasing cuts to the line and not worry about going too far.

 

 

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Lined up the dome light switch holes.  Then with the fabric peeled back, I popped in only two staples along the forward edge to keep it in place.

 

 

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It is nice and snug to the windlace, but had to be trimmed up top where it encroached on the window opening.

 

 

LOWER SIDE PANEL / ARMREST:

 

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First thing to notice is that there are four clips in the body to accept the side panel.

 

 

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The panel, unfortunately, only had three holes cut out.

 

 

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So, I had to mark and make a new hole here through the cardboard backing.

 

 

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By lining up the other three, and the window crank, I roughly cut through the cardboard with a sheet rock knife.

It's crude, but I just want to create a template for the new panels.

 

 

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Here, the fabric is flapped over the armrest, and I pushed it down into position.

 

 

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I pushed down, but it didn't want to go fully into position.

I checked the armrest, but that wasn't holding it up.

I checked the floor, but after trimming one small spot, that was OK

 

 

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Again, last year.  The old panels sit nice and even to the lower window opening.

 

 

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Mine were hanging up quite a bit.

 

 

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Turns out, it was the window crank hole that was 3/4" too low.  So again, I cut it along the upper edge to allow the panel to seat fully and flush with the window.

And now you can see how nice the panels align at the corner.

 

 

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So I pulled the fabric back up, and went inside to tuck it in a little neater.

I used this Permatex adhesive to keep the fabric in place.

 

 

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I think I need a lesson on how to make these corners less bulky!  But for today, this will suffice.

 

 

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Again, any helpful hints on how to thin out this excess material.

 

 

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I tried these products.  If you know of a better product, please chime in!

 

 

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Back out to the car.  The panels align nicely now.

 

 

 

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The panel lines up real nice with the windlace.

How is this section attached?  Once the fabric is wrapped around, you can't drive staples through it.

Is this where you drive tiny brads through the fabric and pull the fabric over the heads?  Or just glue it down?

 

 

 

 

 

ABOVE WINDOW PANEL:

 

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First, I just laid it into position to see if there were any irregularities.  This panel seemed to line up pretty good.

 

 

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So, again, I took it inside to make some releasing incisions to the fabric will lay flat inside the window openings.

 

 

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Up front, I got it to line up nicely with the pillar panel.

Then I just tucked the material around the window opening.

This will have a lace where it meets the headliner on final installation.

 

 

GARNISH MOLDING:

 

 

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I tried to put the garnish moldings in.  

First issue:  There cannot be any cardboard that blocks the window openings.  It just won't fit if there is any obstruction.  So back to trimming excess away.

Second issue:  You have to remove the screws and drop that felt window channel so the garnish molding supports can slip under the felt, and attach using the same screws.

So I have to run a punch through the felt, the garnish support and the screw hole in the window opening on final installation.

 

 

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So here's the rough installation.  Of course, I'll take my time on final install to be sure to chase all the wrinkles out.

But now I have a nice template to follow when the real deal arrives.  

Look how that fabric turned to green!  Really gets accentuated in the photographs!

I'm happy to have had the opportunity to play around with one set before going live.  I learned some pitfalls to watch for.

 

 

I'm not expecting my kit until mid-April sometime.  In the meantime, I'll do the same thing for the drivers side.

 

 

Have a great night out there!

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS...........  A couple photos of the snow:

 

 

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Wednesday evening.  Trees look cool in the landscape lights.

 

 

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It was a heavy snow.  Good that it warmed up quickly today and the trees were fine.

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Gary, 

 

The pictures of your winter wonderland are really first rate.  Your new Nikon really catches what your eyes see.  And enhances them to boot!   We have to drive an hour and a half to see snow here.  Brrrrrrrrr!    It is giving me pause about ordering my Canon EOS.  Both are great cameras and the diff between the two are minimal.  It's just as you said;  Comfort level with what you know.  

 

Lucky you.  You get to "practice" with a bad lot to get it to "perfection". We followers of the build vote that it  should be your middle name.  You personify perfection and it is so gratifying to see you jump the hurdles that get in your way, coming up with sensible answers to the big problems.

 

Great work, Gary.

 

Randy

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You can clearly see where it is located in early photos of his restoration... It is near the rear of the engine.DSC_0214.thumb.jpg.7165898708f45f10e8bad385d2ca259b.jpg

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1 minute ago, MCHinson said:

You can clearly see where it is located in early photos of his restoration... It is near the rear of the engine.DSC_0214.thumb.jpg.7165898708f45f10e8bad385d2ca259b.jpg

I just found it also page 3 post 68 third picture.

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Gary, to reduce the bulk at the corners I will cut out two “pizza slice” wedges out of the over lapped material. The secret is the “point” of the slice should be rounded to approximately 1/4” and that round point should be on the back of the panel just to each side of the corner of the panel board. This means there should be a thin strip on material that’s pulled directly over the point of the corner on the board. To each side of that strip is the pizza shaped cut out. Then pull the material back and everything gets glued to the board. I use spring clamps to hold things while it dries.

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Gary,

 

When cutting out the "pizza slices" from the corners, BE SURE  that you have at least 1/3" of material that is on the back side of the panel.  This ensues that you do not have the material "creeping" back to the edge of the board and then exposing the panel.  As careful as you are, I am sure that will not be an issue.  Without seeing an auto upholsterer for him (or her) to give you tips, as smart as you are, you can figure this one  out.  This is not rocket science, just taking your time, as you always do, and cutting carefully.  Having all that material in the corners always is an issue and getting it to lie flat gives the look of a professional job.

 

Lucky you that you got to do a "trial run" before the material arrives.

 

Randy

 

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Hi Gary,

 

Don't know about anybody else but I am experiencing separation anxiety, its been almost three weeks since your last post!

 

Cheers

 

Paul 

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Hi Guys!

I just returned from vacation.  Took the family to Italy for the Easter break.

Beautiful country but it's great to be home!  

Still no word from LeBaron Bonney but I'm hopeful my interior kit arrives soon.  

I can't wait to get back to the Buick.  So close to the finish line!

Stay tuned!

 

Gary

 

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Gary, I hope you don`t have to wait like I have, I placed my order with LBB December 19th and nothing yet..  Tom

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interesting. I ordered interior for my 1936 yesterday and was told I would have it by middle of May. Supposed to expedite the headliner. Hope I don't have the delays you guys are discussing

Have really enjoyed the detail of this thread and attention to detail. Great historical record of restoration. thanks for your efforts Gary.

Rod

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I received notice this morning that my LBB kit will arrive tomorrow, just shy of 16 weeks from placing order...  I`m happy anyways.. Hoping I`ll still be happy after opening box..

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We were in Firenze and Roma last April with a side trip to Siena and a stop in Orvieto. It was an incredible trip. Of course we weren't there nearly as long. 

 

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I just got an e-mail from LeBaron Bonney.

 

 The "2-N" fabric (The "2-N" is the brown fabric that faded to green) is done and getting its "backing" before LBB gets it.  

They expect to take delivery in 1-2 weeks, and my kit is first on the production line.  

So, it looks like I'll be waiting another few weeks for my kit to arrive, but at least I can see the light at the end of the tunnel!

 

In the meantime, I'll keep practicing with the kit I have.  I want to learn how to get the panels nice and taut and use my "trial kit" as a template for the final installation.

 

Tom...  Glad to hear your kit is being delivered soon!  I'll be watching you install it!!

 

Have a great day out there

 

Gary

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It's good to know what's going on. It's a shame a supply issue is going to hold things up. Now that I'm back on here and caught up a bit, I sense I'll be going into withdrawal. 

 

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Now that you are "marking time" until the arrival of the interior beautification materials, I wanted to revisit a subject I think you mentioned about one year ago. And that is the matter of an engine oil filter. Others can correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect that in 1937 a canister type, engine oil, bypass filter was still an option, and not a standard feature. I think it was used to filter oil initially headed to the rocker arms and shaft. Some restorers have chosen to add such a filter if their Buick didn't come with one. What have you decided to do?

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On 3/30/2017 at 12:50 PM, 1967 - 1997 Riviera said:

 

Now I'd like to see just how you put the new, full-flow oil filter arrangement together. And what (spin-on?) filter you have chosen to use.

 

Somehow last year,  (March 30, 2017 to be exact), I think my thread got a little mixed in with another regarding a full-flow oil filter.  I didn't install an oil filter in the engine.  I actually never knew it was even an option for this engine.  I overhauled the block and restored it as close to factory as I could.

 I change my oil in all my antique cars every 500 miles or once every year regardless of mileage.  

So I'm sorry, but I cannot add any information regarding oil filtration for this engine.

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3 hours ago, 1967 - 1997 Riviera said:

Now that you are "marking time" until the arrival of the interior beautification materials, I wanted to revisit a subject I think you mentioned about one year ago. And that is the matter of an engine oil filter. Others can correct me if I'm wrong, but I suspect that in 1937 a canister type, engine oil, bypass filter was still an option, and not a standard feature. I think it was used to filter oil initially headed to the rocker arms and shaft. Some restorers have chosen to add such a filter if their Buick didn't come with one. What have you decided to do?

Riviera, If you`ll go to Buick-Modified and read Ben Bruces "Modified 263 for my 51D" He tells and shows how he put a full flow filter system on his inline 8(263).. starts on pg2 post #43..

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As far as I know, in 1937 oil filters were neither standard, nor available as an option. The service manual indicates, "The clean oil supply obtained by the use of floating screen makes the oil filter used on previous models unnecessary."

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Saturday April 14, 2018:  Sharing some photos outdoors

 

The temperature got up into the 80's here this weekend so I dropped my plastic crate behind the wheel and drove the Buick out into the cul-de-sac to take a few photos.

It's such a beautiful time of year with the dogwoods and bradfords in bloom.  It's a small "bloom" window and I didn't want to miss it!

The paint really looks nice out there, almost looking blue as it reflects the sky.

As shaky as it is sitting on a crate and pushing the pedals, boy it feels nice behind that wheel!

 

Enjoy!

 

 

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Hopefully only a couple of weeks to the finish line!!

 

Have a great week!

Gary

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What windshield stripping did you use? This looks much narrower and better than what was on my original 36.

Thanks!

~P.

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