Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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On your side windows, what did you use for lower seals?

 

I have a '38 Special, same 2-door body style.  On mine, I finally concluded that a lip seal was used on the bottom channel of the window.  It is a u-shaped rubber piece (that holds the glass into the metal channel) with a lip that is supposed to seal on the edge of the door.  At least I think that is what was used originally.

 

After installation, I can only say that its ability to seal against the door is weak at best.  Plus, since it is below the edge of the door, any rain comes in regardless.  (that's what the drain holes are for!)

 

Any wisdom on this?  And, when (and where) do we get to see this beautiful car?  Great job!

 

Jeff

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I have a '38 Special. There was no "flap' at the bottom of the roll up windows for a seal. It appeared there was no real attempt to keep water out. All there was was the "fuzzy" strip at the bottom of the window opening.

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Yeah, I tend to agree with you Don.  I went with the lip seal version because that is what one of the parts catalogs listed as correct for the '38.  That doesn't necessarily mean they are correct of course!

 

It doesn't do much for rain, but it may help to minimize drafts.  Maybe.

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I may be wrong, but I don`t think `37-`38 had sweeps on the door or garnish originally. I sent Gary some pics of how I did the sweeps on my `36, page 27 post 670.

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I've been trying to get as much information as I can regarding the window seals.  I do not believe the car came with window sweeps originally.  There are no holes anywhere to attach them.  I removed the "lip seal" version from the window carrier (all dry rotted, of course) and I think there are supposed to be rubber window anti-rattlers that fit into the holes in the door and garnish moldings.  I actually did bend the window sweeps, but I have no idea  (except 3M trim adhesive) how I can attach them as access is quite limited to get in there with a drill and small screws.....  Jury is still out, but I'll be trying the lip seal tonight and see if I like it.  I don't know about the '38's  (I don't even know about the '37's!!) but Bob at the paint shop told me that the window sweeps came into production much later than 1937.  (Like in the 50's)  I'll try a couple ways and update as I learn!!

 

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Gary, I know `41 GM cars had sweeps, they were held on to the door with an alligator type clip that was slipped/crimped on the bottom of the sweep, they had a protrusion on the back that pushed into a series of holes in the lip of the door to attach. Sweeps on the garnish were attached with staples..

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Tuesday February 13, 2018:  Installing outer door "bling" and Body Work Beginning on Driver's Door

 

 

 

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I got my delivery of the molding clips and the door handle ferrule / grommet.  But these clips are for a 5/16" hole and the Buick door  is drilled at 3/16" so these would not work.

 

 

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So I started with the door handle by setting the grommet onto the chrome ferrule.

 

 

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I bought the tool so I can seat the ferrules properly.  You first set the gauge nut for 1/16" inside the edge.

 

 

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Insert the grommet/ferrule combo into the door hole, insert the tool and push

 

 

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While pushing in, close the handle and it will create an internal crimp to lock it in and pulls it in tight.

Then, turn the tool 90 degrees and close it again.  Repeat four times and its in.

 

 

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Next, slide in the door handle and watch the hole line up to insert the door handle locking pin.

 

 

 

 

 

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Slightly turn the handle so the hole is clearly lined up and easy to get a screwdriver in there.  Insert and tighten the locking pin.

 

 

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Then a stroke of good luck.  I stopped by the paint shop and the driver's door is underway.  I asked Bob where I could find trim clips for 3/16" holes.

He casually walked me to the back of the shop, pulled out a box filled with tons of fasteners from his 50 years of working.

It took me only 5 minutes to find 20 of these!  Made my day!!

 

 

 

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So I went home immediately, inserted the clips and snapped the side molding in place.

 

 

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Here's how the day started

 

 

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And now with the bling assembled!

 

 

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The moldings line up real nice.  I seem to have a "lazy" door handle.  The handle tends to drop forward and i like it to stay parallel to the molding.

I think the internal square is worn a bit.

 

 

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So tonight I'll set the glass in position and update tomorrow.

 

 

BODY SHOP UPDATE:  Drivers Side Door:

 

 

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The Driver's Door is pretty rusted out along the bottom edge

 

 

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Bob was getting his plan of attack ready.

 

 

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But this will be a challenge.

 

 

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Bob removed the rotted sections and put them aside to create patch panels with the proper curves.

These parts curve front to back AND top to bottom.

 

 

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The rotted sections are removed.  The rust inside will be treated while it's all opened up.

 

 

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Tomorrow the patch panels get welded into position.

 

 

 

Have a great night out there!

Gary

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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Gary, the "droop" of the door handle is probably the part of the latch assembly that the handle shaft fits into. I think the part is brass/bronze, it has a finger protrusion on the side, and wears down on the tip and lets the handle droop..  Tom

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My 1940 Super had the sweepers, held on by very rusty staples. I replaced them with tiny brass screws.

 

I have seen many cars with handle droop but for whatever reason mine don't. Small favors I guess.

 

Cheers, Dave

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All four door hands on my 1939 Roadmaster droop a bit. It is probably less of a distraction with a four-door sedan than with a two-door sedan because it is symmetrical around the jamb between the front and rear doors. 

 

The front handle droop balances the rear handle droop, and vice versa.

Edited by BuickBob49
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Wednesday February 14, 2018:  Begin installing door glass

 

I've titled it "Begin installing" because I wanted to check and double check all the felt channels, the riser mechanism, the fit to the vent window separator.....  Before finalizing the glass installation.

 

Tonight I went through preliminary steps to be sure I have done all the math correctly.  As it turned out, I was very glad I took the extra time to double check everything...

 

 

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From the other day.  I knocked the lower carrier off the old glass, marking the position of the metal with tape prior to removing the metal.

 

 

 

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Tonight: Here you can see the new glass with the positioning tape and generally getting an idea of how things will fall in place.

Before setting the glass in permanently into the carrier, I wanted to be sure the old measurements would translate to the new channel felts, new rubber...

I was thinking that with all the new stuff, something must have changed.  Plus, the original glass was broken just above the carrier so I wanted to be sure there was no stress on it.

 

What I did was use that friction tape you see on the ground to create a "semi-permanent" hold so the glass would stay in the channel and I can test my measurements.

 

 

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So, in order to set the glass into the door, you have to remove the vent separator.

But, to remove the vent separator I had to remove the screws holding the felt glass channel to the top of the door, so I could get at the screws that hold the vent separator in place.

 

 

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Looking very serious..  careful not to hit the paint anywhere, I opened the vent window and began lowering the glass down.

Remember, the lower carrier is held onto the glass with the friction tape for now.

 

 

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Now the channel engages the horizontal regulator bar inside the door.  You can see the upper felt swinging around over my head.

 

 

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With the holes lined up, I placed one screw in the back, one in the front to secure the channel to the regulator.

 

 

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Then re-install the vent window separator and the felt channel up top.

 

 

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First thing was to set the lower window run channel in the door.  I allowed the glass to move up and down basically "setting" the channel in the correct position.

This photo, looking down the top of the glass, the lower run channel is not centered, leaning towards the outside of the door.

But when I tightened the screws, it pulled right into position and it is nicely lined up now.  

FYI:  You can shim the channel with washers... to get the optimal alignment so your glass slides through easily.

 

 

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With the lower run channel secured inside the door and the felt channels tight, I ran the window up and down quite a few times to allow the glass to center itself.

 

 

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When I looked inside, I immediately noticed that the original (blue) marks were off.  The carrier was 1/4" to the rear.

So while it was all in the car and working easy, I marked the NEW carrier position with green tape.

And then removed the felt channel, the vent window separator, the screws, and finally the glass.

 

 

 

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Here is the new measurement that I'm going to use to mount the metal carrier.

I'm glad I took the extra time to double check.

 

 

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I used a 3M product called "Window Weld" inside the carrier.

 

 

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Seat the window glass fully and let it ooze out and cure overnight.  A single swipe with a blade tomorrow removes the excess and leaves a nice finish.

So tomorrow I'll rebuild all the door components for the passenger's side.

 

 

Happy Valentine's Day!

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

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Gary, how`s your rollers on the regulator? I replaced mine with an updated nylon roller and the widow sure rolls up/down easy. The original "T" button fits inside the "C" channel, where the nylon roller is grooved and rolls between the top and bottom edge of the "C" channel. Just a thought.. Tom

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I have a 36 Buick Model 48 which I am modernizing but keeping the look as original as possible. I have the headlamp buckets painted, the trim rings and reflectors re-chromed.

The lamp socket is a funny shape. What I want to do is fit a 12-volt modern bulb in the 36 socket. I might even do an LED to keep the power consumption low. Is there a known modern bulb that will fit in the 36 6Volt socket? ~Thanks! Peer

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1 hour ago, pont35cpe said:

                 Gary, how`s your rollers on the regulator? I replaced mine with an updated nylon roller and the widow sure rolls up/down easy.

 

 

Thanks Tom.

 I have leather rings that fit into the channels so I just cleaned up the channels, greased them and installed everything.  The windows roll up and down smooth, although not "easy".  With all the new felts and channels there is some resistance, but no clunking or tilting of the glass.  I didn't know about nylon replacements.  Also, when I close the door, there is a real nice solid "thud".  Nothing rattles inside now that all the felts channels are replaced and lined up.

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6 hours ago, pplaut said:

    What I want to do is fit a 12-volt modern bulb in the 36 socket. 

 

 

Pplaut:  Check out this post.  It may help answer your question.

 

I had my reflectors restored using the UVIRA process and then everything is stock 6V bulbs.  

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)

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47 minutes ago, Gary W said:

 

 

 

Thanks Tom.

 I have leather rings that fit into the channels so I just cleaned up the channels, greased them and installed everything.  The windows roll up and down smooth, although not "easy".  With all the new felts and channels there is some resistance, but no clunking or tilting of the glass.  I didn't know about nylon replacements.  Also, when I close the door, there is a real nice solid "thud".  Nothing rattles inside now that all the felts channels are replaced and lined up.

Gary, here`s a picture of the nylon roller..

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1 hour ago, pplaut said:

I have a 36 Buick Model 48 which I am modernizing but keeping the look as original as possible. I have the headlamp buckets painted, the trim rings and reflectors re-chromed.

The lamp socket is a funny shape. What I want to do is fit a 12-volt modern bulb in the 36 socket. I might even do an LED to keep the power consumption low. Is there a known modern bulb that will fit in the 36 6Volt socket? ~Thanks! Peer

Peer, The way Gary did his headlights is probably the way you want to go, but here is a couple pictures of the way I converted my `36 headlights to 12v. sealed beams. I grafted MG headlight cans into mine.. Yes, I know I`m breaking the rules here..

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Edited by pont35cpe (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, pplaut said:

I have a 36 Buick Model 48 which I am modernizing but keeping the look as original as possible. I have the headlamp buckets painted, the trim rings and reflectors re-chromed.

The lamp socket is a funny shape. What I want to do is fit a 12-volt modern bulb in the 36 socket. I might even do an LED to keep the power consumption low. Is there a known modern bulb that will fit in the 36 6Volt socket? ~Thanks! Peer

 

More info here:

 

 

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Thursday February 15, 2018:  Vent Window Restoration  and  Finalize Installation of Passenger Door Glass / Related

 

In this post, I finished installing "for keeps" the vent window, the side window, the division channel, the lower door run channel and finally the window felt seal.

I am very happy that I pre-installed everything and did a "dry run" to be sure all the rubber gaskets lined up, the channels were properly aligned...  Made tonight go a lot easier.

 

 

 

 

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January 2017:  This is the drivers door, but the vent window restoration process was the same on both sides.

 

 

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Here I am removing the four upper screws that hold the vent window frame to the door frame.

 

 

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There are three upper screws.

 

 

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Then remove the four machine screws and the unit comes right out.

 

 

 

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Over on the bench, a 1/2" ratchet gets the bolt out to free the window from the frame.

 

 

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Once that is removed, the glass, chrome frame and the rubber will come out.  I had to flex the frame a little to help it come out.

 

 

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Here's all the stuff coming out.

 

 

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And these went out to Paul's Chrome Plating to get rechromed.  The hash marks are my identifying marks for reinstallation.

 

 

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I sanded out the "door frame" of the vent window.  Then cleaned the regulator with Brake Kleen, compressed air and acetone.

 

 

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Cleaned up and ready for paint

 

 

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Applied SEM brand self etching primer

 

 

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Then two coats of Rusteoleum Gloss Black

 

 

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Hang them up to dry.

 

 

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New glass getting cleaned up before installation

 

 

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The chrome came out beautiful.

 

 

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I used this 3M product called "Window-Weld" to secure the glass in the frame.  (same on the other windows)

 

 

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Test fit the glass to be sure it all fits nicely in the frame before pumping the window weld in the frame.

 

 

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Use a caulk gun, express the material into the frame and seat the window fully.  I allowed it to rest on the glass edge overnight to align the glass with the ends of the chrome.

 

 

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Once set, simply run a new blade around the perimeter.

 

 

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The excess peels right out and leaves a real nice finished edge.

 

 

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Ready for its rubber gasket and installation.

 

 

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Wrap the rubber over the frame, insert the stem into the mechanism, install the 1/2" bolt and the entire vent window is ready to be installed.

 

 

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This is where I left off last night with the passenger window.  The Window Weld dried overnight and was ready to go when I got home from work tonight.

 

 

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Same routine.  Cut with a new blade along the carrier and peel off the excess.

 

 

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It leaves a nice clean line.

 

 

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I lightly installed the four lower machine screws to hold the unit in place.  Then I installed the upper screws along the top frame to be sure the frame was straight to the window opening.  

You have to watch up top where the screws are that hold the rain deflector.  My needed a little "persuasion" to get that just right.

 

 

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Then finish tightening up the four lower machine screws to secure the unit.  Vent window in.

 

 

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Here I cranked out the vent window out, moved the crank handle from the vent window to the side window and lowered the window mechanism to the bottom of the door.

 

 

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Dropped the window in and sat it over the mechanism.  Lined up the screw holes and installed it.

 

 

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Next the vent window separator, being sure not to squash the rubber to the vent window and raising and lowering the glass to be sure the channels lined up.

 

 

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So the passenger's door is done.  Looks nice with all the glass back in!

 

 

Have a great night

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Gary, you don't mention anything about the vent window regulators, but they look like they have been rebuilt -- or certainly cleaned up and painted.  All four vent regulators on my car are very loose and wonky.  I haven't taken any of them out of the car yet to investigate, but they feel like they have issues with gears possibly stripped or not meshing properly.   Did you have to do anything to the vent regulators in your car?

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Hi Neil;

While the chrome frames were getting re-chromed, I sanded the "door frame" of the vent window, just cleaned  the gears, then primed and painted it.  My regulators work nice and smooth so I didn't open up the guts of them.

 

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Sanded the frames smooth and used Brake Kleen,  compressed air and acetone I was able to clean the regulator pretty good.

 

 

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Ready for paint

 

 

 

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Self-Etching primer coat

 

 

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Then two coats of Rusteoleum gloss black.

 

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Hang to dry and  ready for  all the goodies to complete the restoration.

 

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

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Friday February 16, 2018:  Update at the Paint Shop - Driver's Door Progress

 

A quick recap of the last few days...

 

 

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This is how we left off.  The rotted metal parts were removed.

 

 

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Using a small wire wheel on the pneumatic motor, Bob was able to remove most of the rust inside the patch area.

He treated it with a heavy coat of yellow self-etching primer.

 

 

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At the bench, the donor metal is measured and cut.  Then it is given its contours.

 

 

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The patch panels are welded into position.

 

 

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A bead of weld is placed over the entire perimeter of the patch panel.

 

 

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Then the welds will be ground down smooth.

 

 

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To address any small pinholes left from the welding, Bob mixes up this Tiger Hair Fiberglass with the blue cream activator.

 

 

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This stuff is pretty sticky and the fibers run in all directions.

 

 

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This close-up shows the fibers.

 

 

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The entire lower door panel was coated with the fiberglass.  It needs to fully cure all weekend so grinding can begin Monday morning.

Once it is ground to proper contour, then the skim coat filler will be applied and the body work can progress as usual.

 

 

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With the fiberglass needing time to cure, the upper door panels started getting sanded out.

 

 

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This is how I left the shop today at 2:00.

 

 

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One more door to go!!!!   (..and an upholstery kit)

 

 

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I can see the finish line now!  I'm so very excited to get behind that big beautiful wheel and stretch her legs.

 

 

Hope you all have a great weekend!

Gary

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