Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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Wednesday Evening, January 31, 2018:  Wiring of the Heater / Defroster Unit

 

 

I didn't really know how the unit was wired originally so this is what I did today:

 

 

DSC_0299.thumb.jpg.ffa8ac7e623f4c93f3e14b5241c0c9fa.jpg

Flashback to last year.  I don't like all the accessory switches in sight right in the middle of the dash.

 

 

 

 

DSC_1142.thumb.jpg.5227c1515156d7f26111403e97b0b6d9.jpg

My first goal was to try to keep the under dash area as "clean"  as I can.  I didn't want all the accessory switches hanging down under the radio and glovebox.

So I wired the Heat and Lite switches down to the left of the steering column.

 

 

DSC_1146.thumb.jpg.ff8fbcb836b072099e9e5a89544ebbda.jpg

The "banjo" is hiding the slide switch that turns on either the cluster / clock lamps or the map reading lamp, but that other black switch over there is how I wired the heater / defroster.

 

 

DSC_1092.thumb.jpg.8c53d51889db6cc170f4a5021505b210.jpg

Looking right at it now, I mounted a SPDT toggle switch into the factory hole that was already in the dash at that location.

 

 

DSC_1100.thumb.jpg.cb5558d2dcd6effba3439c8a28667ba2.jpg

So now, when I turn on the HEAT switch, it feeds the SPDT.  

 

 

DSC_1107.thumb.jpg.360b141ffe6ec30f486cd520862053af.jpg

When I push towards the windshield, it actuates the defroster motor.

 

 

DSC_1105.thumb.jpg.9542fc729536a3d651f2e9f80ca92825.jpg

When I pull it back towards the cabin, it turns on the heater blower motor.  Center is off.

The HEAT switch has a built in rheostat / transformer .....  that changes the speed of the heater motor.

 

 

 

 

 

B E FO R E   A N D    A F T E R :

 

IMG_1049.thumb.jpg.38b5bbdb56b679c33c1fee9a78ca61eb.jpg

January 2017:  Just before restoration began.

 

 

DSC_1176.thumb.jpg.b81762c684f0562a7de5ecb41fd93858.jpg

January 2018:  Huge improvement.  

I really like the way the radio fills in the center.

Those four wires hanging down are for rear speakers if I want to install them.  I need to tuck them away.

 

 

 

DSC_0299.thumb.jpg.ffa8ac7e623f4c93f3e14b5241c0c9fa.jpg

BEFORE

 

 

DSC_1174.thumb.jpg.77d11fbb0da63c892fe84ef1460d91c1.jpg

TODAY

 

 

 

Have a great night out there!

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

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As always, when I need some information on things I have a look at the old Torque Tube magazines.

The subject of heater and defroster switches is discussed on page 20 of this issue:

http://www.1937and1938buicks.com/The-Torque-Tube/Volume XIX Issue 2 (November-December 2000).pdf

 

Note that Harry says the switches were mounted through a hole in the lower lip of the dash to the left of the steering column. Indeed, on both my cars there is a hole already there for these switches. While undoubtedly correct, they are not really convenient and the light is difficult to see.

 

I'll see if I can get a shot of my installation of these switches as described in the TT

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Here are a couple of shots of my heater and foglight  switches. Sorry for the poor quality.

The fog lights and switch were on the Roadmaster when I got it in '85 as an unrestored car. It is just below the cigarette lighter

DSC_6065.JPG

DSC_6066.JPG

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Saturday morning, February 3, 2017:  Update at the Paint Shop..... Passenger Side Door

 

I stopped by the shop yesterday after work and again this morning.  The Passenger side door got it's base coat early this morning and is getting clear coat now.

 

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This was Wednesday.  The self etch primer applied to both sides.

 

 

 

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Friday after work.  Grey "build up" primer on.  The lower door panels look really great.

 

 

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Another view of the grey primer sanded out.

 

 

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6:15 this morning.  Base coat Super Jet Black

 

 

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After setting up a bit, it's ready for clear coat.

 

 

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Bob, wearing a respirator, rigged the door so he can get at the inside and outside in one session.

 

 

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I was able to watch for a while as he gets in and out of all the curves.  Constantly changing angles as he sprays the clear.

 

 

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Finishing up the inside of the door.

 

 

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Now turning to the outer door skin, he slowly sprays the clear.

 

 

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Finishing the first coat of clear.  I had to leave at this point.  Getting a headache.  I believe it gets another (or two?) coat of clear.

Then it will cure all weekend before getting wet sanded and machine buffed.  Bob is going to install the door seals for me.  I got a new kit from Steele.

 

 

DSC_1315.thumb.jpg.0bf5b2c8b275ffbf50d09a7fa90fe69f.jpg

As for me..... it was pulling the final set of ziplock bags out of the box labelled "door stuff" and of course.......

 

 

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More hours at the wire wheel getting all the fasteners ready for paint and install.

 

I should be hanging the door Wednesday.  I think it'll be easier to hang the door on its hinges and build all the felt window channels, vent window, install the glass, door handles.... while its on the car.

 

 

Have a great weekend!

Gary

 

 

 

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I agree on guts assembly after the door is hung. It is heavy enough gutted.

I made the error of thinking I could install the weatherstrip after the door is hung. Impossible - I had the remove the door to install it.

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Super Bowl Sunday February 4, 2018:  Door handles, Door Locks and Hinge pins

 

Seems like pretty mundane stuff, but it took me a while to get these parts ready for installation

 

 

 

 

 

Hinge Pins:

 

DSC_1313.thumb.jpg.61bd7d7d5d9379af50109e8cf1146a2c.jpg

Is it crazy to constantly mark every part so it goes back into the same spot?  Sometimes I think I need to get some professional help!

Hinge pins are probably universal, but I have this ridiculous fear that after 80 years, they have worn into a sweet spot and I didn't want to disturb it.

 

 

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So I made "hash marks" on the underside so they go back where I got them from.  

 

 

DSC_1409.thumb.jpg.b361410cd05fc970df8d1236f4f780d0.jpg

I really boogered up this one trying to get it out.   It was stuck and I needed a hammer, punch... 

So, before I hit the wire wheel,  I got my Dremel out to start reshaping the head

 

 

DSC_1410.thumb.jpg.68b8fbaf77e35f928ee8856c7d40d844.jpg

And shaped the taper back on to the bottom of the pin.  I mushroomed it pretty bad when I knocked it out.

 

 

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Everything cleaned up on the wire wheel prior to priming and painting the heads gloss black.

 

 

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After removing all the old paint and rust, there was a little more work to do reshaping the head and creating a nice contour before paint.

 

 

 

Door Handles and Lock:

 

 

DSC_1391.thumb.jpg.fd0bdff9366ad330d79c1e40c0bebedc.jpg

This is how the morning started.  Even after the chrome shop got done, the shafts were still very rusty.

The small screws in the middle are to secure the door sills.

 

 

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Here's the after photo.  This is the result of the wire wheel.  

 

 

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In this photo, you can see the "before and after" but I also noticed that the rust was also INSIDE the lock chamber.

 

 

DSC_1592.thumb.jpg.c57628ecf73d832b6e0a70bf62a631a2.jpg

So, before I assembled the lock, I sprayed some WD-40 down the shaft and what a mess came out!

I took my time with a long, thin screwdriver and by scraping the inner walls it finally ran clean.

 

 

DSC_1601.thumb.jpg.eb881587dac68074755b4ce97f1ac7b0.jpg

Amazing how much rust and debris came out of there.

 

 

5a77474b2ff6c_BuickLockInside1.jpeg.88725efcc56de0d77eb4b79caf3dca6c.jpeg

Here's the Service Manual depiction of the internal lock.  My internal mechanism is all together, not apart like the picture above.

 

 

 

DSC_1589.thumb.jpg.369dcda92dbcb688c9eb74871456379d.jpg

The internal shaft is one piece.  Here I lined it up so I knew how far the lock cylinder went into the hole in the handle to line up the pin.

I sent the handles out for chrome, and the chrome shop disassembled everything.  This is all I got back from them.

 

 

DSC_1591.thumb.jpg.2dfa8ce26e67b2972a4efcd803f0b4fd.jpg

So I slid the lock mechanism into the hole in the handle

 

 

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Tapped a galvanized finishing nail through the holes to secure it into position

 

 

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Used the dremel once more to smooth out the protruding ends.

 

 

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Key in

 

 

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Key turns easily and the internal tumbler turns so I think I'm OK.

 

Actually, I'll never lock that door anyway so.......

 

 

Enjoy the game!

Gary

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Gary,

 

Quit  "beating" yourself up for your penchant for detail.  Labeling and bagging the parts so that they go back in just as they came out will give you the fit and finish that MIGHT be there if you switch the parts around.  The fact that your car is back in one piece (almost), looks fantastic and runs is testament to your standards.  How many times that an individual has taken something apart, bags it and  a year later are scratching their heads.   Not only does the composed individual label, catalog and mark the part (up down, left or right) but also adds photos for complete documentation.   This prevents the puzzle from having missing pieces or worst yet............"Now how the HELL did this part fit in here????"   Add to that a time lapse of a year (or so) and then the picture really gets fuzzy.

 

At a younger age, with a lot of energy and little patience, did I take something apart  only to find out the hard way about  1.  photo documentation  2. marking the part(s) and marking the bag  3. and where applicable, re assembly in reverse order of the disassembly.  You have that in spades plus one;   You are neat and keep your work area(s) clean and orderly.  That says volumes about you Gary. 

 

After logging onto your thread, I bet a lot of followers have gone out to their garages and work areas, looked in dismay at their project and have started cleaning up their messes and putting things away.  I know I have.   I am striving to keep my work areas clean and free of the clutter that so plagues a lot of us.

 

SO NO, you do not need a mental examination.  Being neat and orderly is an asset.  We should all be so organized and methodical in our pursuit in our restoration projects.  You are "leading by example" and your kids are getting the best lessons in life from your work ethic and methods. 

 

Randy 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

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47 minutes ago, Randiego said:

Labeling and bagging the parts so that they go back in just as they came out will give you the fit and finish that MIGHT be there if you switch the parts around. 

 

Exactly this. Also, sometimes differences in parts aren't obvious. It really makes the difference between knowing how something goes together, and screwing around for hours trying to figure it out.

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It's much better to be hyper detail oriented than the alternatives of missing parts, "where does this go" questions, and similar issues. 

 

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On 1/31/2018 at 5:36 PM, Gary W said:

Wednesday Evening, January 31, 2018:  Wiring of the Heater / Defroster Unit

 

 

I didn't really know how the unit was wired originally so this is what I did today:

 

 

DSC_0299.thumb.jpg.ffa8ac7e623f4c93f3e14b5241c0c9fa.jpg

Flashback to last year.  I don't like all the accessory switches in sight right in the middle of the dash.

 

 

 

 

DSC_1142.thumb.jpg.5227c1515156d7f26111403e97b0b6d9.jpg

My first goal was to try to keep the under dash area as "clean"  as I can.  I didn't want all the accessory switches hanging down under the radio and glovebox.

So I wired the Heat and Lite switches down to the left of the steering column.

 

 

DSC_1146.thumb.jpg.ff8fbcb836b072099e9e5a89544ebbda.jpg

The "banjo" is hiding the slide switch that turns on either the cluster / clock lamps or the map reading lamp, but that other black switch over there is how I wired the heater / defroster.

 

 

DSC_1092.thumb.jpg.8c53d51889db6cc170f4a5021505b210.jpg

Looking right at it now, I mounted a SPDT toggle switch into the factory hole that was already in the dash at that location.

 

 

DSC_1100.thumb.jpg.cb5558d2dcd6effba3439c8a28667ba2.jpg

So now, when I turn on the HEAT switch, it feeds the SPDT.  

 

 

DSC_1107.thumb.jpg.360b141ffe6ec30f486cd520862053af.jpg

When I push towards the windshield, it actuates the defroster motor.

 

 

DSC_1105.thumb.jpg.9542fc729536a3d651f2e9f80ca92825.jpg

When I pull it back towards the cabin, it turns on the heater blower motor.  Center is off.

The HEAT switch has a built in rheostat / transformer .....  that changes the speed of the heater motor.

 

 

 

 

 

B E FO R E   A N D    A F T E R :

 

IMG_1049.thumb.jpg.38b5bbdb56b679c33c1fee9a78ca61eb.jpg

January 2017:  Just before restoration began.

 

 

DSC_1176.thumb.jpg.b81762c684f0562a7de5ecb41fd93858.jpg

January 2018:  Huge improvement.  

I really like the way the radio fills in the center.

Those four wires hanging down are for rear speakers if I want to install them.  I need to tuck them away.

 

 

 

DSC_0299.thumb.jpg.ffa8ac7e623f4c93f3e14b5241c0c9fa.jpg

BEFORE

 

 

DSC_1174.thumb.jpg.77d11fbb0da63c892fe84ef1460d91c1.jpg

TODAY

 

 

 

Have a great night out there!

 

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

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Wednesday February 7, 2018:  Installation of the Passenger Side Door

 

Bob finished the passenger side door about noon today.  I had a long "honey-do" list to accomplish, so after dinner, my "crew" helped me lift and install the door.

I didn't  install any of the door goodies yet,  just got it hung on the hinges and closed tight.

 

 

Here's the latest from the last few days:

 

 

DSC_1618.thumb.jpg.f02c710726e10a2debe9b4df99461d7b.jpg

I finished wire-wheeling and painting the door sill screws.  I painted them the same color as the sill.  (Aluminum... just like the hood vents)

 

 

DSC_1629.thumb.jpg.733533d63bf41bffb485487f57fc216d.jpg

I finished the hinge pins.

 

 

DSC_1779.thumb.jpg.c165e6673fad6cb685a7504a888ad569.jpg

On the body, I ran a fine round file through the hinges, as the pins would not go through.  After all the body work and paint, stuff gets in there.

Then I cut strips of scotch brite pads and "flossed" out the debris and smoothed out the interior walls.

 

 

DSC_1775.thumb.jpg.60a77dfeab073bfb3b82aa4cfbe9e782.jpg

Satisfied the pins go through easily, I set them aside and ran down to the paint shop to pick up the finished door.

 

 

DSC_1690.thumb.jpg.98d35d29c63daaf74a3fd1898cac4278.jpg

This was Monday, Feb 5.  Bob was wet sanding the cured clear coat in preparation for the machine compound.

 

 

DSC_1673.thumb.jpg.2af69dde2e23f85062bd076aafe744d5.jpg

Installed the door wedge.

 

 

DSC_1749.thumb.jpg.89409510f68e34d09069f64a6030e838.jpg

And this morning he installed the weatherstrip around the perimeter of the door and the bottom.

 

 

DSC_1730.thumb.jpg.a6ea9261f9c1c347ab6b3d5774831fbb.jpg

Ready for the drive back home.  Bob said "It shines like a mirror!"     So I bought it home and ..........

 

 

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Got a photo of the car......   REFLECTING off the door!     I guess he's right!!

 

 

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Back it up a little.  The man does beautiful work!

 

 

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I had a screwdriver in the upper hinge and a thin "T - Handled" allen wrench in the bottom hinge to use as punches to help align the door.

 

 

DSC_1801.thumb.jpg.7ef59dbc3d7330a97d1c7cf822e42973.jpg

Enter the crew.

 Kyle held the door up, I was pushing the hinges into position and Matt stood guard to drop the screwdriver in the hinge.

 

 

DSC_1802.thumb.jpg.1a6a886cc2945790bb99b670106b66ee.jpg

Top in, then down to the bottom hinge which gave us a fit.  The pin made it through the upper hole, the main body of the hinge but would not go through the lower hole.

 

 

DSC_1826.thumb.jpg.4922267b8af528dbf8ece2d17c9a5b6b.jpg

We ended up running a third hinge pin up from the bottom until it started lifting the upper pin.

Then, driving the upper pin back down, it simply followed the alignment pin and it found its way.

These two are great helpers!

 

 

DSC_1832.thumb.jpg.dbdb075ce221100141b386894f09e293.jpg

So, it closes nice and tight.  Especially with the new seals around the door.  

 

 

DSC_1842.thumb.jpg.1f0477b7cfff3b1e6cdfc79656d97549.jpg

The gaps all look nice around the entire perimeter and nothing is rubbing or scraping anywhere.

 

 

DSC_1840.thumb.jpg.71e034ef4dabbc67576c21b2f0b59722.jpg

Tomorrow I'll start with the vent separator, the window felt channel, all the inner door goodies, the glass, the outside handle, the trim piece......

But it's on and looking good!

 

 

Thanks everyone for following along!

Have a great night!

Gary

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Gary, in the past when I`ve installed the hinge pins I always had the bad luck of chipping the paint off the top of the pins when installing, so this time, for my car, I bought stainless steel pins from chevys of the 40s. My original pins were worn pretty bad and would have had to be replaced anyways.. I agree your paint does look like a black mirror..  Tom

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I tapped the pins out from the bottom.  One really got messed up.  The top is knurled and it really holds tight.  

I used a rubber mallet to install

 I did remove paint  from the mating surfaces of the hinge.  The fit is so tight that even a little paint prevented the door from seating fully.

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15 hours ago, Gary W said:

Wednesday February 7, 2018:  Installation of the Passenger Side Door

 

Bob finished the passenger side door about noon today.  I had a long "honey-do" list to accomplish, so after dinner, my "crew" helped me lift and install the door.

I didn't  install any of the door goodies yet,  just got it hung on the hinges and closed tight.

 

 

Here's the latest from the last few days:

 

 

DSC_1618.thumb.jpg.f02c710726e10a2debe9b4df99461d7b.jpg

I finished wire-wheeling and painting the door sill screws.  I painted them the same color as the sill.  (Aluminum... just like the hood vents)

 

 

DSC_1629.thumb.jpg.733533d63bf41bffb485487f57fc216d.jpg

I finished the hinge pins.

 

 

DSC_1779.thumb.jpg.c165e6673fad6cb685a7504a888ad569.jpg

On the body, I ran a fine round file through the hinges, as the pins would not go through.  After all the body work and paint, stuff gets in there.

Then I cut strips of scotch brite pads and "flossed" out the debris and smoothed out the interior walls.

 

 

DSC_1775.thumb.jpg.60a77dfeab073bfb3b82aa4cfbe9e782.jpg

Satisfied the pins go through easily, I set them aside and ran down to the paint shop to pick up the finished door.

 

 

DSC_1690.thumb.jpg.98d35d29c63daaf74a3fd1898cac4278.jpg

This was Monday, Feb 5.  Bob was wet sanding the cured clear coat in preparation for the machine compound.

 

 

DSC_1673.thumb.jpg.2af69dde2e23f85062bd076aafe744d5.jpg

Installed the door wedge.

 

 

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And this morning he installed the weatherstrip around the perimeter of the door and the bottom.

 

 

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Ready for the drive back home.  Bob said "It shines like a mirror!"     So I bought it home and ..........

 

 

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Got a photo of the car......   REFLECTING off the door!     I guess he's right!!

 

 

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Back it up a little.  The man does beautiful work!

 

 

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I had a screwdriver in the upper hinge and a thin "T - Handled" allen wrench in the bottom hinge to use as punches to help align the door.

 

 

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Enter the crew.

 Kyle held the door up, I was pushing the hinges into position and Matt stood guard to drop the screwdriver in the hinge.

 

 

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Top in, then down to the bottom hinge which gave us a fit.  The pin made it through the upper hole, the main body of the hinge but would not go through the lower hole.

 

 

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We ended up running a third hinge pin up from the bottom until it started lifting the upper pin.

Then, driving the upper pin back down, it simply followed the alignment pin and it found its way.

These two are great helpers!

 

 

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So, it closes nice and tight.  Especially with the new seals around the door.  

 

 

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The gaps all look nice around the entire perimeter and nothing is rubbing or scraping anywhere.

 

 

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Tomorrow I'll start with the vent separator, the window felt channel, all the inner door goodies, the glass, the outside handle, the trim piece......

But it's on and looking good!

 

 

Thanks everyone for following along!

Have a great night!

Gary

 

I really enjoy seeing pictures of your "crew" helping you with things like this, properly hanging the door. But I'm curious as to who is taking the pictures?

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My camera has a feature called "Interval Timer Shooting"  So when I am doing things that require "all hands on deck", I can set up the camera and every  30 seconds it snaps a shot.

When I set the hood, I actually had my iPhone taking video, then I take screenshots of the important parts.

 

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Before you do the driver side don't forget the side mirror if you are doing hinge pin mounted one...

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Sunday February 11, 2018:  Begin installing "Door Goodies" on the passenger's side

 

(13 months today!)

 

The last few days I've been busy getting the internal guts of the passenger's door installed.

 

 

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First was the drip shield

 

 

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I used all the original screws, doing my wire wheel job on all the door fasteners.

 

 

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Then I installed the door check rod with the new rubber stopper from Steele.  I adjusted it so it stops the door just before the door hinges hit to stop the door.

 

 

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Window run channel coming out a year ago.

 

 

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Everything restored and going back in tonight!  I kept the screws loose until I actually drop the glass in there and allow the glass to align everything.

 

 

 

 

****  NOTE:    Post # 517  on PAGE 21  (9/8/2017) Details the restoration of the Window Run Channel in the door and the Vertical Division Channel (Vent Window Separator)  ****

 

Back to business...

 

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Next, the vent window assembly.  Here it is coming out last year.

 

 

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Fully assembled and going right back into position.  

 

 

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Then the vent division post.

 I quickly realized that these screws had to be cut down, and then the rubber vent window rubber had to be trimmed back to allow it to seat correctly.

So this part and the vent assembly were in and out and in and out quite a few times before it was right.  I wanted to be sure this section was just right before starting the window felt channel.

 

 

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Here it is installed and nice and snug to the vent window.

 

 

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The view from outside.

 

 

Then I started on the window:

 

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First I removed the lower carrier from the original glass.  It popped right off.  Notice I marked the position before I knocked it off.

 

 

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I transferred the markings to the new glass.  Then out to the shed to wire wheel these parts before installation.

I'm waiting for the rubber seat where the glass sits in, then goes in this carrier.

 

 

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So the next job was the window felt channel.  This is how it gets delivered, so I first used my dremel to make a nice clean cut.

 

 

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Like the rear window, I used the actual glass to carefully form the felt channel.

Pushing against the cabinets to keep the top secure, I slowly started making the bend.  Go easy.  It needs time for the stainless to slide out.

 

 

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Just taking it little by little, it will nicely form around the glass.

 

 

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I left a 1/4" at the forward top so I could custom trim it to the vent division upright.

 

 

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Over to the door for the first trial.  A dry run to measure the overlap at the vent division and make that cut.

 

 

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After measuring and making the cut, it fits pretty nice up against the vent divider post.

 

 

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Satisfied with the fit up there, I began marking for the holes to screw the felt channel in place.

 

 

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I used my same technique as the rear roll up windows.  First, I lay the blue tape near the holes and mark the hole position up around to the door opening.

 

 

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Fit the felt channel in the window opening (again) and I use a silver sharpie to make a mark on the side of the felt corresponding to the lines on the tape.

 

 

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I use a 1/4" piece of wood in the vice and up into the felt and drill my holes according to the silver marks.

 

 

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When its black on black on black and you are looking up into the lights, believed me these marks come in very handy.

The screws find their way easily into the holes and the felt channel falls right into place.

 

 

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So the felt channel is in and I'm satisfied with the fit.

I'm waiting for the rubber lower window channel (the one the glass fits into inside the window riser) before I can drop the glass in place.

 

 

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I decided to buff up the side trim moldings.  My passenger side was held on the car by "hot glue" or some kind of silicone pumped in through the cowl side.

 

 

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My door moldings had at least half the clips broken.  These also had paint down the sides and rust inside.

 

 

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Here's the pile of rusty clips I removed from the door stainless molding strips.

 

 

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I first used a non-scratch Scotch-Brite pad with this Quick-Glo to remove the rust, paint and begin prepping the surface.

 

 

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Next onto the cotton wheel for a buffing with jeweler's rouge.

 

 

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So much better!

 

 

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I did restore the clips that were usable.  I ended up ordering 24 new clips for the door moldings, so I only used four of these on the cowl section.

 

 

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And Paul's Chrome shop returned the visor support for the passenger side.  So I installed that as well.

 

 

Hopefully I'll have the door completely ready for interior panels by Wednesday if all the parts come in this week.

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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I’m super happy because I got to try Gary’s “many hands on deck “technique this past Saturday. I went to the body shop to help the owner install a 68’ Camaro convertible roof and we couldn’t finish it because the tack strips were too deteriorated. So I said because we had time, how we could get my 32’ Olds parts he had at his shop, prepped and painted. He said sure and set up a couple tables. I started sanding with 600 my radiator shutters while he sanded and glazed my dash and other parts. His brother in law walked in the door and asked what we we’re doing. When I said “sanding a bunch of stuff” he said to give him some paper and he jumped in. My tail light buckets, stanchions, license plate brackets, top bow insert, dash, and trunk rack got all prepped, some got urethane primed while others got sealed. What a huge difference with 6 knowledgeable hands over 2 how quickly things can get done. So I told them I’d treat for the Red Bull and Jagermeister this coming weekend for the wheel prepping party at the paint shop! They’re both younger and drink that stuff but it’s cheap enticement if it works. I really need to get my wheels painted! I like the many hands method.

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Gary,

 

AH HAAAAA  ! ! !

 

 

Now we know one of the reasons that your shop stays so clean.  You do all of the buffing and grungy work out in.................................THE SHED ! 

 

Now that explains why your garage is so clean.  Anyone using a buffing wheel to clean the rust and grunge off of a part will know how much crap and residue ends up on the floor or on the wall (if you don't have a shielded wire wheel).  

When I buff off corroded parts (if I don't put them in the blast cabinet), I move my wire wheel out onto the drive way to keep that junk out of my shop. Flinging the residue will be where it is easy to clean up instead of behind the benches, wall racks, etc.. etc.

 

It is nice to see your "step by step" methods of your restoration.  This could be a book on how to do a restoration........CORRECTLY ! ! 

 

One thing that is coming to your aid.....fairer weather!  Just a short time from now, it won't be cold any longer and that will really give a boost to the restoration time as it won't be so cold for working in the garage or when you need to do something outside on the drive.  Time moves fast when you are busy.

  

Awaiting your next post.

 

Randy

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Oh,

 

And the millennials imbibe a much different "concoction" that we did in our day.   A case of beer or a bottle of Jack usually got the necessary help to give a hand when it was needed.

 

Today, these youngsters imbibe all sorts of.........................spirits.  The oddest guy I knew in my day (back in the 70's) , who incidentally had the most beautiful car collection (in St. Louis) starting with his fathers 32 Pierce 2dr Roadster,  the family Cadillac limousine,   His IMPECCABLE 57 Tbird (100 point car that he restored himself) for a few,  drank Cutty and.......milk!  He said that the milk kept his stomach from being upset.   What ever works.

 

These days my drink of choice is coffee and cold bottled water with a Johnny Walker (Black Label) over ice... on occasion. 

 

Southern California has the worst water in the US. Alkaline and cruddy tasting.  Hence we started the bottled water craze that is world wide now.  In your area, Gary, we are told that the Catskills provide NY and surrounding areas with the best water in the world.........right out of the tap.  Luck you. 

 

Randy

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