Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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6 minutes ago, Jack Worstell said:

It is confusing the way Buick labelled the ammeter.....the  "+"  and  "-"     bit.         To me it's easier just to ignore the  +     and  -      designations but otherwise follow the Buick drawings.   (  frankly I wonder if the  +    and  -   designations were a typo.......but it really doesn't matter )

 

The previous advice about being careful not to put too many amps thru the ignition switch I think is good advice....in fact we did this on out 1937 Special.   It's not that hard to add a relay

( triggered by the ignition switch )   to prevent damage to the ignition switch contacts.      I think most auto stores have a relay that would work OK for this purpose.

 

We added quite a few accessories to our 1937    (including overdrive relay and solenoid )    Some things ended up on ignition hot circuits and some ( for example all lights )  ended up on battery hot circuits.   We added a little "switchboard" under the dash so that later on we could switch any given component from one type  circuit to the other type circuit if we should change our mind about something   ( eg  maybe down the road we might want to change the radio from ignition hot to battery hot )

 

Jack Worstell

 

Good advise about adding a relay and not putting to many amps through the ignition switch. 

 

The troubleshooting section of the manual for my 27 says something like if the ammeter readings are reversed, then reverse the wires on the back of the gage.  It's only a directional flow meter, if you connect to the wrong side you will know it by the readings, easy to correct. 

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No, not a typo. If you take into consideration how the current flows it is correct. First look at the ammeter as if it were out of the circuit. If you were to connect a voltage source to the plus (positive) term and a load to the minus (negative) term, when the circuit is completed the current flows from the source to the positive term, thru the meter which deflects to the right showing positive flow current, out the negative term and thru the load and back to the source.

 

Now put the meter back in the circuit. Now with the generator not running, the source is connected to the negative term and the load (the ignition, etc.) to the positive term. When the circuit is completed the current flows in the neg to pos direction in the meter and it deflects to the left.

 

Now add the generator into the picture. As the gen current output increases, it in effect becomes the source and the load is now on both the pos side of the meter (ignition etc) and the neg side (the battery when the generator's voltage is greater then that of the battery). So now the current flows from the source (the gen) into the pos term of the ammeter and out the neg term to the battery. The needle deflects to the right.

 

When the battery is fully charged and the gen current output is reduced to just match what is required by the car load (ignition etc) the batt and gen potential (voltage) will match and therefore no current flow thru the meter and the needle stays centered. In other words all is balanced. When you turn on the lights you unbalance the system with a discharge shown until the gen output increases to a) replace lost battery charge and B) match the new, higher load.

 

So this is maybe more than you want to know but does explain it in detail.

 

Now before some wag pipes in with how the electrons actually flow out the negative term of the source to the positive term, yes, we know that. But old Ben Franklin labeled current flow before we even knew about electrons. He had a 50/50 chance of being right and he was wrong in the end. But it really does not matter as we only have to consider actual electron flow when dealing with active devices such as transistors and vacuum tubes, and even then only in the design of said devices.

 

Cheers, Dave

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27donb.........yes you make a good point and one that I should have mentioned in my post above.

 

Ammeters are easy in that if you wire them up backwards.........just flip the connection

 

Jack Worstell           

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If you look at the guts of the ignition switch, you'll see the actual contact points are extremely small, thus the current density is very high. Adding significant loads could cause problems, as it did in my case

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Saturday November 4, 2017: Updates

 

Busy day around the house, so I didn't have a lot of Buick time.  But I managed to get a couple of things done:

 

 

 

Paint Shop Update:

 

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Front fenders have the rubberized undercoat applied to the underside.

 

 

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This coating will set over the weekend and the base / clear gets sprayed Monday morning on the upsides.

 

 

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So, using the old fender welt as a guide, I started cutting and trimming the new welting.

 

 

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My plan is to actually attach the new welt to either the fender or the body with double backed adhesive tape to keep it steady while the fenders are mounted.

Also, I want to punch a few holes for the screws to go through just to be sure it stays in position.  I hate when that stuff pulls out.  Looks so sloppy.

 

 

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I ordered these countersunk, flanged finish washers for the interior kick panels.

 

 

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The job looks much better now.  Just finishes off the panels nicely.

 

 

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Then I worked on the stainless trim molding that runs down the rear quarter panel to the trunk.

First, I buffed the moldings using a slow speed wheel and jeweler's rouge.  Then finished with a hand rubbing to bring out the shine.

I did a "dry run" to be sure all the mounting clips were still aligned with the holes in the body, and made small adjustments accordingly.  (You only get one shot to get it right!)

Once I was satisfied the moldings were ready to be thrusted into position, I carefully applied a small amount of weatherstrip sealant only to the "depression" at the base of the clip.

I used 3M Black Super Weatherstrip and Gasket Adhesive and just rimmed it around the base of the clip.  My thinking was this will keep everything neat for installation and will seal the "business end" of the clip.

I'm thinking if I get caught in a rain storm, water can leak into the trunk from the holes in the body if not sealed......

 

 

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"Seal each clip and hole"

 

 

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I knew I read it somewhere!  Had to clean the garage to find it!

 

 

 

 

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Line it up, check both sides, check again, start pushing the clips in....

 

 

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A little persuasion and she snapped right into position.

 

 

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It's so nice seeing some of the finish parts going back on!

 

 

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Left side.

 

 

 

Have a great day out there!

Gary

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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I once read a thread on another forum titled "restoring for the next generation".  I think you are doing that at the very least.  In fact, I suspect that 70 years from now when that car is restored again, GM will get a lot more credit for the care with which they assembled cars than they deserve, based on the effort that you put into this car.

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Adding the stainless trim really spices things up and it is fun and easy.

Question?  On a '38 there is fender welting only at the rear between the fender and body and none at the front where the fenders bolt to the "nose piece". Might check with the '37 experts. (If it mmatters)

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Gary, I noticed a posting of your headlight doors on `37-`38 Headlamp Rings. What stood out was you haven`t detailed the grooves in the rings, maybe you just haven`t got to it yet. I`m trying your method to do the grooves on all my `36 dash chrome. Excellent job on everything!!  Tom

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I didn't know that the rims were painted.  If so, I can do them right on the car.

Thanks for the heads up!

G

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Sunday November 5, 2017:  One Year Ago Today!

 

One year ago today, November 5, 2016, I purchased my Buick.

Drove it home and immediately joined this Forum, the BCA and the '36 - '38 clubs.

Been a busy year so far!

 

 

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Here she sits, all windows down trying to air it out!   Bullet holes and all!

 

 

Quick Video of the homecoming!

 

 

CLICK THE BLUE LINK HERE ------------------>           Buick Coming Home 11:5:2016.mov         <-------------------- CLICK THE BLUE LINK HERE

 

Thanks for all the constant advice, encouragement and the many followers of my thread!

Gary

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2 hours ago, Gary W said:

I didn't know that the rims were painted.  If so, I can do them right on the car.

Thanks for the heads up!

G

 

Gary,

 

I have never seen any headlight rims that were painted. I have never seen any with any traces or paint remaining on any original ones. I don't think that they originally had paint but would certainly love to hear from anyone who has been around long enough to have seen some when they were newer. 

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Gary, I looked at pictures of 200+ `37-`38 Buicks and found one with the grooves painted so was probably not original. Just my personal preference, the black lines really accent the chrome. If you are trying to stay 100% true to factory, there is one thing I`ve noticed, but maybe I should just keep it to myself..  Kinda surprised none of the purists have not mentioned it.  HA!!  Tom

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21 minutes ago, pont35cpe said:

Gary, I looked at pictures of 200+ `37-`38 Buicks and found one with the grooves painted so was probably not original. Just my personal preference, the black lines really accent the chrome. If you are trying to stay 100% true to factory, there is one thing I`ve noticed, but maybe I should just keep it to myself..  Kinda surprised none of the purists have not mentioned it.  HA!!  Tom

 

What makes you think that the purists have not noticed something? Gary is doing an excellent job on his restoration. There are a few things that I have mentioned to him privately but I love the job and the documentation that he is doing. I don't think that anybody would begrudge him a few small modifications from original. I am probably considered a "purist", but there are a few things about my current restoration project that will probably deviate from absolute originality. 

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1 hour ago, MCHinson said:

 

What makes you think that the purists have not noticed something? Gary is doing an excellent job on his restoration. There are a few things that I have mentioned to him privately but I love the job and the documentation that he is doing. I don't think that anybody would begrudge him a few small modifications from original. I am probably considered a "purist", but there are a few things about my current restoration project that will probably deviate from absolute originality. 

I`m not begrudging him one bit, Gary is very open minded about everything concerning his project. I`m no purist but I know how they are when it comes to judging someones vehicle no matter how trivial it may be. 

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Monday November 6, 2017:  Paint Update

 

 

I arrived at the paint shop this morning before work just in time to help Bob turn the fenders over for paint.  Everything with these large fenders is easier with two guys.

 

 

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7:45 am.  Bob and I just flipped them over on to the horses.

 

 

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Here's how I left the shop on my way to the office.

 

 

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I stopped by after work and they are shining like jewels!  The many compound curves of these fenders really look terrific!

 

 

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I won't be able to get them until the weekend as they need to completely cure before Bob starts the wet sanding, buffing and hand rubbing.

But I'm ready!!!

 

Have a great night!

Gary

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Larry :

What I am always impressed with is there does appear that Gary and support craftsman have ROOM to work! Which I am crowded at best to do anything. It does make a difference!

The other Larry

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FWIW, I would concur with the earlier suggestions to add a couple of surreptitious relays rather than run large loads through the stock switches. My experience is that the switches for heavy draw items (lights, blower, etc.) are prone to pitting and deformation after repeated use.  Besides, if you use relays, you will see less voltage drop (i.e. better performance) at the part in question.

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Our 38 still is wired as it was originally. It still has the stock generator and regulator. Our radio is working and all the light bulbs except the parking lights are now halogen. the ignition switch is stock and there are no relays. We drive at night almost every week. We also have the overdrive and overdrive relay but it doesn't go thru the ignition switch. I have turned on the heater and the defroster and all the lights and the radio and it still shows a charge when its moving, at an idle it goes to discharge but it does not seem to hurt anything. Normally everything is not on at once but I do that every once in a while for a test. We have new a new wiring loom made by an outfit in California so the actual wires are in good shape. Nothing wrong with relays etc but I am just saying the stock system is fine if the wiring is good and the switches are good and the connections are good.

 

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5 hours ago, LAS VEGAS DAVE said:

 I have turned on the heater and the defroster and all the lights and the radio and it still shows a charge when its moving, at an idle it goes to discharge but it does not seem to hurt anything. Normally everything is not on at once but I do that every once in a while for a test.

 

... the stock system is fine if the wiring is good and the switches are good and the connections are good.

 

 

Turning everything on at the same time as a "test" probably isn't the best idea, because the real problem is heat from possible overloaded circuits.  You'll never know if the ignition switch is being overheated until the contacts burn out, as others have shown. 

 

Have you felt the main feed wire at the ammeter with everything on? 

 

What does the ammeter read with everything on, with the engine not running?  That will give a more accurate indication of total amps through the circuit, based on the accuracy of the gage. 

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Some of the 30s-40s parts cars I`ve bought over the years had electrical damage at the instrument cluster, and the source of the problem was the amp gauge. Bob Boyd, a guy I met and have bought Buick parts from, told me that was a common problem and how to remedy it was to bridge a piece of 10ga solid core wire from post to post of the amp gauge. He said the gauge will still show charge or discharge but only a fraction of the power travels thru the gauge.

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