Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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Sunday October 22, 2017:  Sound Deadening, Insulation

 

 

This afternoon I applied the Dynamat Extreme insulating panels to the floor inside the cabin.  Then I used a Dynamat to insulate the floor of the trunk.    Here's how I did it:

 

 

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Clean everything up.  

You'll want to remove the battery cover, accelerator pedal, transmission cover and just remove the lower two screws of the pedal plates.

 

 

 

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I bought this Dynamat Extreme "9-pack" which is 36 sq feet total.

I found the sheets very easy to maneuver and cut.

 

 

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I began by laying things out with the backing paper still attached to try to figure the easiest way to lay things out with minimum cuts.

 

 

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First piece being installed.  

 

 

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I used the roller they recommend.  I purchased it when I did the firewall.

Roll everything down tight and into all the grooves.  It is very easy to mold into all the recesses.

 

 

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Once the back sheets were in, I moved up front.  If you mark out all your openings, screw holes and other things with a gold sharpie marker it makes it easier to cut outside the car.

 

 

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Here's my marks around the pedal pads.  I just removed the lower two screws and slid it under.

 

 

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CAUTION!  IF THIS DOUBLES OVER ON ITSELF,  IT'S RUINED!

I lost one piece because I didn't know that once it folds over on itself there is this instant bond that is unbreakable! 

So I learned to leave the paper on, seat the leading edge then remove as you roll the mat down to the floor.

 

 

 

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The stuff is in, and I just have to re-install the accelerator pedal and the transmission cover.

 

 

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Covers back installed, which also helps keep the edges down nice and tight.

 

 

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Another view

 

 

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So, that is what 8 1/2 sheets will cover.  I only did the floor, and that's all you get out of the kit.

 

 

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For the trunk, I opted to use one single "Dynapad".  It's 1/2" thick and very heavy.

Here, I lined up the rear edge to the trunk edge and folded it over to get the support line.

 

 

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Using chalk, I marked the folded edge.  Remove it from the car and you'll get a good clean cut.

 

 

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Being this pad is so heavy, I felt it really didn't need to be so strongly adhered.

I used this 3M product only on the edge.

 

 

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A light spray, about 2" in from the back edge just to tack it in position and prevent sliding.

 

 

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It's a good fit, and a nice cushioned base and a heavy sound deadener.

 

 

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Next, I measured my trunk liner from LeBaron Bonney.  Again, keeping it nice and straight and even at the edge, I measured the angled wood support

 

 

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Give it a good crease and mark it with your chalk.  Then double check it.

 

 

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Don't cut all the way through so you don't mess up your leather binding.

 

 

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Put some weight on it so it sets nice and flat.  

So, next is the side panels and installing the wood floor.

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

 

 

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This looks to be different than the shape of my 36 Model 48 which is no surprise as the 36 was a one off year. However, I will check my rear glass to see how different it is... or not... 

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Gary:

 I know on my 37 the spare tire (bias 6.50 X 16 WW) is a snug fit without any liner or mat under the wooden shelf. I was not aware that there was a trunk mat under the tire. I assumed that it was only on the floor above. Not much left of my original trunk side lining. The pattern is more like a burlap weave.

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I believe burlap weave is correct. I spoke, just recently, with Dave Tacheny about this for the 36.

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Monday October 23, 2017:  Installation of the Radio and Trunk Side Panels

 

Tonight I installed the radio (Just finger tight for now), and the side panels and trunk tool area panel:

 

 

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I was working alone and that thing has some weight to it!  You have to lift it with the dial/knobs pretty much straight up, then lift the back to turn it into the dash opening.

At the first attempt, I realized the support bracket needed a little more bend to it so it lines up.

So, all back out, then in,  took three tries to get it to align properly.

 

 

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Here it is being supported by the rear support iron that shares a bolt with the rear hood hold down.

 

 

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The radio finish plate and the mounting nuts.

 

 

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With the tone knobs and the plastic knobs the dash looks complete now.

 

 

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It's a great look.  

I only finger tightened everything because I think I'll be removing it when it comes time to install the hood and get it aligned.  

Plus, I really think I need a longer rear hood hold down bolt to support the radio.  The bolt I removed from the rear of the hood just barely threaded without a radio.

 

 

REAR TRUNK SIDE PANELS:

 

 

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From LeBaron Bonney:  I did a couple dry runs first.  

 

 

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Using my chalk I measured all the cutouts, the edges, the deep crevices....

 

 

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Using the headliner adhesive, I carefully cut slits and tucked the edges in to my chalk lines.

 

 

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Again, headliner adhesive over the wheel well.

 

 

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I used the same roller from the Dynamat to roll it out smooth to the wheel well, then more adhesive to roll it up the walls......

 

 

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Side panels in, and the kit came with a thick fabric to line the "tool area" behind the spare tire.

 

 

Have a great day!

Gary

 

 

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For the window, I wonder if that channel is the right stuff? Might they have used a deeper one? Or a channel without a bead and a separate flat furry wiper with the silver bead, as was used along the side of door garnish mouldings?

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Any thought to covering the front halves of the rear tire wells with the same sound deadener to reduce tire/road noise or does the rear seat do that for 'free'?

 

Great work as always

 

I change the oil in the wife's car in the driveway and feel pretty good then I see you install an entire interior in the same amount of time.

Edited by Brian_Heil (see edit history)
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We sprayed the interior with ceramic sound deadener. Including the underside and inside of the trunk, wheel wells, etc. 

I plan on putting a glue down deadener on this and then cover the interior of the trunk with the burlap. I just need to make sure whatever mat we put down is dark colored so, writing an such does not show through the burlap fabric.

 

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Wednesday, October 25th  and  Thursday, October 26th 2017:  Fabricate new Trunk Wood and Finish Trunk interior kit installation

 

I started Wednesday evening by trying to restore my original trunk wood parts.  My goal was to sand them down, clean them up and re-use them.  These wood parts still had that same horrible mice urine smell that was throughout the car, but it was still so pungent in the wood.  So I figured I'd bleach them out and done........ Not quite........

 

 

 

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Here'a my original trunk shelf that sits above the spare tire.  You can clearly see the delamination and the mold from years of rear window leaks and mice.

The wood actually smells!  That same horrible smell that overwhelmed the interior of the car when I bought it.

 

 

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My thought:  Peel off the delaminated wood and get down to nicer wood.  I figured I could sand out the next layer and the trunk shelf would be one layer thinner.

 

 

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This is the part closest to the back seat.  You can see when I removed the top ply, there was still water damage and mold under there.

 

 

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So, I got out my belt sander and went to town.  I sanded it clean and smooth.  Then I washed it down with bleach.  I gave it an hour to dry.

IT STILL SMELLED TERRIBLE!    So.......

 

 

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Trace it out

 

 

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Cut it out

 

 

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Sand it out

 

 

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And by 6:30 I had a duplicate set for the trunk.  I used the originals as templates to drill all the holes for the mounting screws.

I did not cut out all the large holes.  I don't really see the need for having them.

 

 

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I painted the wood using a black paint I used on the front door of the house.  

 

 

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And let them dry completely Wednesday night.  

 

 

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Tonight I laid them out to attach the wood block that seems to hold the spare tire from moving forward??

Then when I went to install the wood, the spare must be larger than the original because that wood block prevented the wood from seating.

So I eliminated it.

 

 

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I wire wheeled and painted all the mounting hardware that came out of the car.

 

 

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I found it a lot easier to install the forward screws from inside the car.

I also found that I could not get the rear piece of wood in the car with the spare tire in there.  When I removed the spare, it gave me just enough room to wiggle the board in position.

 

 

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Flashback to Monday night, this is how far I got with the trunk kit.

 

 

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Now the wood shelf is installed and I put the mat over it.  But I still have two more pieces of fabric that has to go in.

There are no instructions at all, so this is what's left:

 

 

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Two smaller pieces on the left side.  The large piece on the right, I used like a "drape" to cover the spare tire??

I don't know, is that what that is used for???

 

 

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So I draped that piece over the spare...

 

 

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The colors are all exactly the same shade / color.  The photo makes the mat look different, but it is not.

Anyone know what the few pieces of fabric are for, please chime in.

 

 

Thanks!

Gary

 

 

 

 

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Gary:

 There are remnants of the burlap fabric still draped from the frame of the panel in back of the rear seat on my 37. (The current working space you now have). The car is stored 3 blocks away and I will try to get a photo tomorrow.

Larry

Edited by dibarlaw (see edit history)
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Gary, 

 

I am not sure the purpose of the two holes in the one board. The single hole in the other board is very helpful. It allows you to check the air pressure and/or add air in the spare tire without having to remove the spare tire from the trunk.

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Sorry Gary, but I thought that there was some material left on the back of my rear frame. Just the burlap like side covering the wheel wells and sides. I took my camera but the 2 batteries must have fallen out when I replaced my SD card. Had a nice run with the Huskie on a lovely fall day anyway!

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It is interesting to see the incredible defference between this car and my '38 Special coupe's trunk. No fancy stuff in the '38 trunk. No carpet and the sides and back are just lined with very a heavy paper. And, yes, the hole on the most rearward board is for access to the spare tire valve.

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Sorry, but I couldn't resist jumping in here with a little "before and after" moment.  I only have one question?  Where's that great fan?  I hope it's getting the full "Gary W" treatment! :P

 

 

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Friday October 27, 2017:  Update at the paint shop...  Front Fenders

 

 

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Flashback to January.  The paint was cracked all around the fenders.  

 

 

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After blasting and delivery to the paint shop.  The alligator started down here in the old bondo.  (Or whatever that stuff is in there)

 

 

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All the old filler is ground out.  Here you can see some metal pitting around where the fender lamp attaches.  

I guess the rubber tends to hold some moisture under there.  (Same for where the bumper irons exit out through the fender as well)

 

 

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Here is a close up of the pitting around the bumper support irons.

 

 

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And look how thick the old bondo is!  There is a metal patch in there, or possibly a fender lamp was attached??

 

 

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Using the hammer and dolly, Bob reshaped the metal to the original contours.

 

 

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Carefully placed taps bring the metal right back to shape.  This way we don't need to use so much filler.

 

 

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Filler applied and started sanding.  

 

 

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Here you can see the damage to the metal around the wheel opening.

 

 

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And after grinding, filling and sanding.

 

 

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Sanded smooth and all the pits filled in.

 

 

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Self-etching primer applied and ready for the build up primer.   Other fender up front getting the same treatment.

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Sunday October 29, 2017:  Some odds and ends

 

 

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Installed the hand accelerator pull knob.  It was hopelessly rusted together, so I had to cut it just after the metal sleeve inside, then restored all the parts that show.

I don't think I'm going to use it as originally intended.  I'm thinking I may use it as a separate light switch to turn the Trippe lights on.

But it looks nice back into its spot anyway!

 

 

 

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Windshield divider installed.  I   s l o w l y   tightened the screws to allow the rubber to seat fully without bending anything.

 

 

Installation of the kick panels:

 

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Very carefully marked all the holes while in the car and the edge of this panel aligned with the door opening nice and straight.  

I started by peeling off the windlace.  Then set this piece just where you want it to line up.  Mark the holes in the car with a punch.

Pull this piece back out and I used a leather punch to punch nice clean holes for mounting.

 

 

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This way you don't have ragged edges.  Put this aside and time to finalize the fit of the windlace.

 

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Using headliner adhesive, I gave a little "tug" downward to be sure it was seating nice and tight.  Then, using the same punch I made a hole down the line.

I didn't want the screws to "bunch up" the fabric when installing the panel.

 

 

 

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Bottom of the windlace.  First I cut it about an inch long.

 

 

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Then, making a much more precise mark, .........

 

 

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I peeled back the outer fabric casing to expose the inner rubber.

 

 

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Here you can see the final cut brings the rubber nice and flush to the floor of the car.

Then I rolled the fabric over the cut and the excess lays nice and flat so I can glue it down, set it under the sill plate..

So it stays nice and straight and won't pull off.

 

 

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Finish marking and punching all the holes, giving the lace a little pull towards the front so when the panel drops in it all tightens up nice.

 

 

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I think I'm going to find more decorative screws with the nice decorative washers, but these will keep it happy for now.

I know the upper end should cover the dash screw, but the dash was bent away from the car up there and when I tried to install it over that screw, the panel began to crease.

Plus, the dash keeps the panel in nice and tight, so I did it this way.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

 

 

 

Installing the rear roll-up windows tomorrow!

 

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If you use a flanged finish washer rather than a regular finish washer, it's not as likely to cut into the surface of the panel when tightened.

 

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FWIW I think Fisher Body was using something more like this:

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Not that Gary needs our advice, but now I know something more.

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Keep ALL THE ADVICE COMING!!!   Keeps me on track!

Appreciate all the input I've gotten here.

 

G

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14 hours ago, Gary W said:

 

Sunday October 29, 2017:  Some odds and ends

 

 

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Installed the hand accelerator pull knob.  It was hopelessly rusted together, so I had to cut it just after the metal sleeve inside, then restored all the parts that show.

I don't think I'm going to use it as originally intended.  I'm thinking I may use it as a separate light switch to turn the Trippe lights on.

But it looks nice back into its spot anyway!

 

Gary:

 If you are using a remote/hidden starter switch that that would be fine. But if you are planning on using the original vacuum accelerator starter system the hand throttle is important. Many a time if you stall on a hill and the parking brake will not hold and you start drifting back..... Foot on the brake, pull out the throttle which will engage the starter. Back in business. A real life saver... Ask me how I  know!

Larry

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