Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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The answer to both 1 and 2 is no.  The car ran very very smooth.  She let out some bluish smoke on acceleration, and you could faintly hear the wrist pins when it was idling.  Other than that, it was a very good running engine.  I had to pull the engine to replace the flywheel ring gear and the throw out bearing.  I figured it needed rings, and found a cracked ring in #2.  also, to fix the wrist pin noise, I decided to get new pistons.  But the crank, cam, rods.....all in great shape.   I didn't feel the need to have everything magna fluxed.

 

3. The block: The block is standard so I wanted to keep any machine work to a minimum.  I figured no one can bore it as good as Buick did 80 years ago so  I used a hone on an electric drill to simply "deglaze" the cylinder walls.  A ridge reamer was used to remove the carbon from the top of the cylinders.  I bought a set of standard 1938 "domed" pistons and there is enough clearance.

   The head:  my local machinist removed the original valve guides and installed the new ones.  I bought all new valves but re-used my springs, keepers... as all that stuff is all in great shape.

 

So very minimal machine work was done, although it is a complete rebuild of the engine.  

 

Aside:  My piston rings arrived tonight so Ill be installing the pistons in the block saturday, putting the oil pump in and the pan on and then moving on to the top end.  

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Today I'm absolutely sick to my stomach.

 I wrote on a previous thread that I would take a lot of the chrome parts locally to reduce the cost, but I will spend to have the grill, headlamp rims, hood vents....the centerpieces of this beautiful automobile, all chromed at one of the professional shops.  So, after weeks of research, phone calls....  I decided on Paul's Chrome Plating in PA.  Their staff is really great, and explained everything so I sent my grills and other parts via UPS.  Today, Dawn at Paul's Chrome sent me photos of the damage.  UPS dropped the box, or dropped something on the box, and BROKE BOTH MY GRILLS!  And I had everything double boxed, extra padded..... I can't imagine the weight that had to have dropped on the box to do this much damage!  My stomach is churning.

 

 

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I hope they were insured sufficiently to pay to repair them or replace them. You might want to call Dave Tacheny and see if he has some replacements available. It might be cheaper to buy replacements from Dave than having the broken ones repaired. 

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Double boxed and it still sustained damage? Sounds like a truck actually ran over it! In the last couple of years I have noticed more and more issues with UPS w.r.t. damage during shipment. It used to be UPS was much better than USPS but not anymore. Too bad.

 

Cheers and good luck,

 

Dave

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Back in the garage today to continue building up the engine: 

Installed the rings on the pistons,

Heavily oiled the grooves,

Compressed the rings,

Greased the rod bearings with the moly lube,

Oiled the wrist pins

Inserted the pistons into the block and

Torqued the rod cap down to 40 pounds.

Repeat seven more times!

( I Didn't finalize the cotter pins yet, going to re torque tomorrow.)

Dismantled and cleaned the oil pump. 

Timed the engine and installed the timing gears and chain.

 

 

..I tried to upload photos but I'm having trouble tonight.   Haven't encountered any upload trouble before.

 

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15 hours ago, Gary W said:

Rings.jpeg

Piston dressed.jpeg

oiling rings.jpeg

ring compressor.jpeg

moly lube.jpeg

inserting pistons.jpeg

inserting pistons 2.jpeg

rod seating on crank.jpeg

bolting rod caps.jpeg

caps bolted.jpeg

thrust bearing.jpeg

timing gears.jpeg

finished.jpeg

Just wondering if you got the timing right.. Both crank and cam marks clocked at 3oclock with 11 links in between?

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I better double check that.  I had the book out, counted the links and put a dab of white paint to make it easier to line up but working on the block upside down and feeling the tappets move.......trying to make sense of it all when 1 is on its power stroke and both valves are closed....  I'll look at it again.  Thanks for the "heads up"!  

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Please check out my work here.  I think it looks about right.  I guess I won't know for sure until I build the top end and follow the book, but I think I'm very close now:

 

Same photos...just turned on it's head so it looks more like the book.  I'm working upside down.

 

 

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Gary, looks correct to me. I "think" the flywheel mark should be in the bell-housing "window" also.

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I double checked my timing marks.  I think I got it just like the book now.    also, beginning to run low on engine bolts and parts!  That's a good feeling!  getting closer to firing her up!

 

Larry....My oil pump sits on a gasket flush with the block.....is that correct?

 

 

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Gary, I think Larry is referring to the plate on the bottom of the pump that covers the oil pump gears..

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Gary,
 

You want to make sure that the oil pump bottom cover is not worn by the gears. If there is excess clearance between the gears and the bottom plate, you will have lower oil pressure than you should. You want to make sure you address that while you have it apart. This discussion probably explains it better than I have:

 

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This is what the bottom oil pump plate on my 1925 Standard looked like before I lapped it. I think the one on my 1937 was just as bad. On my 1937 I lapped the plate and installed new gears.(1988) 8thousand miles later I am still running at 45 lbs. After an all day hot run it may drop to 30lbs.

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Seven Weeks Today:

Seven weeks ago I cleared the garage and made space for the Buick Restoration.  In that time, I have made some pretty good progress.  Today I "finished" the engine.  (Timing cover, oil pump, pan, balancer pulley, Then turn the engine over (fun); head gasket, head, push rods, rockers, push rod cover, adj valves to .017, painted valve cover...... few more additions and we're off to the races.  I took an hour for lunch and then removed the body bolts, put all four tires back on and pushed it outside.  Using a crane, I was able to lift the rear of the car, support the front of the body on horses and by utilizing "GO-JACKS" under the tires, pushed the frame out from under the body.  I'm exhausted!  

 

 

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Today's Engine Build:
I wire wheeled  the nuts and bolts and sprayed them gloss black.  

Painted/Installed the timing cover, then the balancer pulley

Installed the oil pump and the oil pan then turned the motor over on it's pan. 

Moly lubed the tappets and installed each one where it came from.

Permatex copper sprayed on both sides of the "graph-tite" head gasket, repeat

Using studs to line up gasket, and then install the head and torque in sequence to 65 pounds

Installed all push rods, then the rocker arm assembly.  Once torqued, I turned the engine over to do a preliminary valve adjustment to  .017"

Installed the pushrod cover, painted the rocker cover

Added 5 quarts of Break-In oil and using an electric drill counter clockwise, ran the oil pump and the oil made it EVERYWHERE!

So it needs to be painted, and then finish the "easy" stuff (distributor, generator, starter, carburetor, manifolds)  She should be up and running soon!

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After lunch, I tackled the task of removing the body from the frame.  I was able to remove the doors myself, then I attacked the body bolts.  Let me tell you, eighty year old bolts JUST DON'T WANT TO MOVE!!!  It took a while, but I did get all 14 body bolts out and labeled so they go back where they came.  I measured the front mount so I have an idea how much to tighten them down when I reassemble so the doors, hood...hopefully don't get too out of position.  so I reinstalled all four tires, and using a "GO-JACK" I was able to maneuver the car and push it outside.  (63 degrees here in Jersey today!)  I used the engine crane to lift the back of the body.  Then by supporting the front of the body, I was able to push the chassis out sideways right out from under the car!  So while I wait for  the blaster to come over, I now have the chassis all ready to be power washed, de greased, and painted.  I am planning on replacing all the springs, restoring the shocks, and doing a complete brake job including rebuilding the master cylinder.  It will be so much easier to install the engine in the frame with the body out of the way.

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Here is an engine dolly I built. I aslo ran the engine on it. Makes it easy tor roll around while the rest of the car is being done

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I like that!  Much better that mine sitting on a dolly on its pan..

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Today I took advantage of the 71 degree day and rolled the chassis out to pressure wash, degrease and clean.  Took just under 2 hours to get 80 years of gunk off that thing!  

 

BUT...I did find what I think is the Date of Manufacture on the passenger side chassis rail!  February 16, 1937.  So she just turned 80 last month.  Thought that was kinda cool.

 

 I included a photo of the rear spring shackle before and after.  I was going to paint the engine, but tomorrow is supposed to be cold and snowy so I'll do that job tomorrow.

 I applied the decal to the freshly painted valve cover.  Trying to get something accomplished everyday.

 

 

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I'm not a Buick guy (although we did have a 54 Skylark once) but I have to comment on this thread:

 

1.  Your garage is awesome.  How you are doing a full restoration on top of a rug is beyond my comprehension.

 

2.  The detail and documentation in this thread is superior.

 

Carry On.

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Gary, you are, in the vernacular of young folk today, a savage! You have accomplished in a few weeks what would take many of us the same number of months, or even longer! Best wishes and keep it rolling!

 

Cheers, Dave

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Wow! You even still have the spring covers. Mine were too bad to save.

 The place that worked on my 37 was to steam clean the front end of the chassis. The first thing on my list. I had already spent one summer on my back scraping and cleaning from the rear bumper to the X member. I did not want to go thru that again. Well they did not clean any thing on the underside. I am still finding things. The front end lower shafts on my car do not have renewable bushings as later cars do. 1936 design. The arms and shafts were very worn. They replaced tie rod ends and king pins and said all was tight. When I went to have the front end aligned and scraped the muck from the front end parts the lower shafts and arm wear showed up. I have yet to adapt the later arms with bushings to replace them.

 Larry

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