Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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On ‎7‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 11:34 AM, pont35cpe said:

Gary, I just gotta say everything looks great..  I like the painted recesses in the wiper towers, and maybe you just haven`t done it yet, but how about the recessed vertical grooves of the speaker grille? Would make the little ribs stand-out..  Tom

Please refer to post # 415 on the previous page.

 

Gary,

Here's my '40 series 90 wheels with 3 stripes and they are not evenly spaced, FYI.

"Buick" was painted with the "brush and wipe" method using Krylon sprayed into the cap.

It has lasted 5 years so far.

 

Mike

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Edited by FLYER15015 (see edit history)
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IMHO, folks often overestimate the precision and care of factory work.  That is, the different widths and spacings of the stripes may be nothing more than sloppy work or different painters.

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38 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

IMHO, folks often overestimate the precision and care of factory work.  That is, the different widths and spacings of the stripes may be nothing more than sloppy work or different painters.

Most certainly.  

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Since the cars were assembled in different locations, it is very possible that parts suppliers may have differed in things like the wheel striping.

I agree with KongaMan. The original engine paint on my '38 Roadmaster looked as if someone just threw a bucket of paint at it (Except the valve cover with logo on it)

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10 minutes ago, DonMicheletti said:

Since the cars were assembled in different locations, it is very possible that parts suppliers may have differed in things like the wheel striping.

I agree with KongaMan. The original engine paint on my '38 Roadmaster looked as if someone just threw a bucket of paint at it (Except the valve cover with logo on it)

My 60 Electra with 32k original miles has engine green overspray on the carb.  The body tag was hastily taped and firewall sprayed the body color. Then tape removed leaving the body tag covered in the base brown primer. Factory assembly, fit and finish were not like today's vehicles. 

I spoke with a fella that worked the line at the DE plant. He stated that some nuts and bolts did not find a home but ended up behind a door panel. Sometimes an empty bottle of liquor found its way there as well. 

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3 minutes ago, avgwarhawk said:

I spoke with a fella that worked the line at the DE plant. He stated that some nuts and bolts did not find a home but ended up behind a door panel. Sometimes an empty bottle of liquor found its way there as well. 

 

To that end, there was some kind of a tool (bent wire with a handle made of tape; like a prison shiv :P) left in the trunk of my 64.  I know it came from the factory because they painted right over it, then put the trunk liner on top of it.  You'd think they would have noticed the big lump, but I guess not.

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Gary;

   Everything looks great. I keep following.

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10 hours ago, 1937-44 said:

 I thought Marty once told me his wheels originally had two stripes.  Sometimes it is hard to tell what is/was original so your enlightenment does give me more doubt. I do know in sales brochures the majority of them show three stripes (some none) but those are not always accurate. I'm not going to argue either as my suspicions are mainly based on just my car then. For now I'll capitulate and we can go back to following this great thread.  :)

 

Carl

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Just in the interest of helping Gary have the best information and not trying to be argumentative, but here is a photo of Marty's car. While I dispute that the red color wheels are correct for a 1937 Buick, his photo shows 3 stripes on the wheels on his car.  The best information that I have is that the Buick specifications for 1937 called for three stripes. The two outer ones were narrower than the center one, as indicated in the previous document I posted earlier. 

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 I capitulate, :)  at least until I can find something to support the claim.. :)

 

Carl

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 Dale I have accepted my wheels may have been repainted in the 50's or 60's although they don't look it. However when we accept everything we hear or read as fact we cease to learn.

 

Carl

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We are getting further from the time when we can talk to GM employees in management, on the floor or in the repair shops that were involved with these cars during production and routine use.  In fact, we are getting further from the time when guys were involved in the first round of restoration of pre-war cars.  I expect some knowledge could be lost.  Thanks to all for the investigation and commentary of the wheel stripes. 

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Over 220,000 1937 Buicks were built that year.  The likelihood that they all left the factory using all the same parts is unlikely.  

 

Lots of different suppliers we used, quality control  was NOT as good as today.  Inspectors most likely allowed things to slip through, so to say ALL that all had the same size/number of wheel pin stripes, well, NO ONE CAN SAY FOR SURE THAT 'THREE' WAS ALWAYS THE CASE.

 

Sure most did have three stripes, but don't be surprised to learn that a few got out with just two.  I don't know about 1937, but do know for fact that in 1954 Buick built cars per customers request.  Dad ordered a 4-door RM for a customer painted with a BRIGHT GREEN BODY, BRIGHT RED TOP, AND BLUE INTERIOR, so maybe Buick did some special treatments in 1937,  I just don't know.

 

Dale in Indy

 

 

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Gary, I know this is taking you back to April when you got your new rear springs from Eaton, but last week I ordered new rear springs from Eaton for my `36 Buick coupe. They arrived this morning and to my surprise they have a plastic liner between the first 4 leafs. Looking at your new springs, they didn`t have the liner, was that the reason for the Slip Paint? Seems odd to me that your springs didn`t have the liner but mine do..   Tom

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Hi Tom;

 

I still restore my leaf springs the same way I was taught over 25 years ago:   I disassemble every leaf and run a wire wheel over the entire surface of both sides.  By doing this, it will highlight any "slag" that is pressed or rolled into the steel.  Then, I take my time with a chisel and make sure all of this slag is removed, because I was told that when the spring flexes, the slag will certainly come loose and start to rust and squeak.  Once that is all done, I wash everything down with acetone and begin the painting.  For the Buick, I had the leaves blasted clean after the wire wheel treatment.  This created a clean, but "roughened" surface for the POR-15 to "bite".  I applied the POR-15 on both sides of the springs, followed by two coats of the Slip Paint.   

 

(SEE POST #143 on Page 6 for the process)

 

I started using "Slip-Paint" a few years back on my Model "T", and I really like how it performs and I don't have grease and oil squeezing out from the leaves.  (And the road dirt doesn't have anything to stick to so they stay nice and clean.)

 

I actually DID entertain the idea of buying a set of those leaf spring liners for the Buick, as the idea seemed pretty good.  But the ones I saw looked like the old "Hot Wheels" tracks I played with when I was a kid, and I didn't like the look of the lip showing in between each leaf.  So I opted to stay to my tried and true methods....

 

I'm curious to find out how they work!  It seems like a very good idea.  

 

Sorry for such a long-winded answer, but my leaf springs from Eaton  DID NOT  come with the leaf spring liners installed.  But I like to use the Slip Paint regardless.

 

Gary

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Gary - Two thoughts come to mind;

 

1. Got to love American technology...particularly when you see new technology (this web-based forum) facilitating the collaboration surrounding solid-vintage-USA-designed-developed & manufactured technology (your vehicle) so that it is preserved into the enduring future.  Go USA, and those that care about it!  Details actually "do" matter!!

 

2. Whether contemplating the subject vehicle, or its caretaker (Gary), a common-denominator and resonating thought is "Driven to Perfection!"

 

I could not stop reading, looking at, and watching what you and your team have compiled...all 19 pages thus far...which comprises one of the most comprehensive, well-captured & presented works of focused passion, teamwork and collaboration encompassing American-designed-developed-and manufactured technology-preservation involving family, friends, and sharing...truely impressive and most-commendable!

 

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Gary, thank you, thank you for posting the disassembly of your 37. Couple questions, why didn't your sand blaster do the inside of the kick panels, why leave that fabric insulation material on the inner side? Can you get those cage nuts somewhere? Did you take the factory rivets out of the hood where the chrome vent pieces are, I didn't see them in the pictures. 

 

We plan to put a new chassis under this model 46 so we have the original, complete chassis with motor, trans available if someone knows anyone who is looking.  We will need to have the speedo/gauge panel reconditioned, do you have a name of someone who does that?

 

Thanks again for your postings, it has been very informative.

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Shore Guy:  I really appreciate you following the posts and the kind words.  It is a labor of love and cannot be done without a great support team!

 I get so lost in the history of these automobiles.  Often I think back to the guys on the assembly lines building these beautiful machines, and I have a great respect for them. In a way, I feel like my restoration is preserving that part of our history.

 

Dallas Alice:  

                        1. I did remove a couple of small pieces of the insulation to assess the metal underneath.  The metal is perfect so the decision was made to simply leave it in place.  

                              (If the metal was rotted or rusted under there, it would have all come out.)

                        2. Cage nuts are readily available from CARS or Bob's.  I needed 6 new ones and they fit right in.  Look back at previous posts in the body shop.  You can see them being installed.

                        3.  Yes, I ground out the rivets from the hood vents.  Sent the vents out to be re-chromed and I will re-install with stainless steel machine screws / lock washers / nuts.

                               ( See Page 17, Post # 403.  You can see the hood vents delivered from the chrome shop)                   

                        4. Bob's Speedometer will recondition the entire instrument cluster.  All five gauges, rechrome the frame.....  nice job.

 

I really appreciate everyone following along.  Got some news today that the body work will continue uninterrupted starting Monday morning so hopefully the build begins in a few weeks!

 

In the meantime......

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Saturday August 12, 2017:  Steering Column

 

Column is finished.  Looks very nice and I think the brown color will really compliment the newly wood grained dash.

(This was started on Page 14, Post # 341)

(Then on Page 17, Post # 403)

 

 

 

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Flashback to the "rope trick" sanding off that wood grained brown paint.

 

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All cleaned up down to the bare metal.

 

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Acetone wipe down and then clean with one of John's pre-paint solutions.

 

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John spraying the primer.

 

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Primer applied and allowed to fully dry for a week.

 

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A very light sanding of the primed surface..

 

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Blow off all the dust with his compressor and then a final wipe down with a clean rag.

 

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Using this paint, reducer and catalyst....

 

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John mixes it all together.

 

 

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First only a light "tack-coat" is applied.  Then the color coat.  This is followed the next week with another color coat to really give the paint "depth".

 

 

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Here we are after the second coat of color.

 

 

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And now all the tape removed.  

 

 

Aside......  In the glove box was an original key that fit the cylinder and still works.  (This photo is not the original key)

I will paint the insets black on the ignition switch like the other parts.

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary


 

 

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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Wednesday August 16, 2017:  Update on the body / paint progress

 

The Impala with the rotted out quarter panel is now repaired and out of the shop so my Buick has the place to itself!  It was great to stop by this morning and see my car centered in the shop and getting prepped for paint.  Today Bob started spraying the yellow "self-etching" primer on the inside surfaces of the body.  He was decked out in a ventilator mask and headgear.  I was photographing by going outside, taking a deep breath, then holding my breath while snapping a few shots......  I didn't stay long.   I left him spraying so I don't know how far he got.

 

 

 

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My Buick is center-stage!  Progress will continue uninterrupted now.  Bob will dedicate his shop to my car until it's done.  

 

 

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Window riser removed from the passenger's side.

 

 

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Driver's side also stripped down and the bare metal cleaned up for the self etching prime coat.

 

 

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The "self-etching" primer is actually grey at first. It takes a good five minutes of constant stirring to scrape all the "mud" off the bottom of the can and get it to disperse in solution.

Then the color changes to yellow.

 

 

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First, the entire inside surface is blown off using the compressor.  Then, a tack cloth is used to wipe everything down.

 

 

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Begin spraying the primer coat.  

 

 

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Here he's doing the roof rails that support the headliner bows.  I didn't stay any longer.  The smell is an instant headache!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A quick note about my color choice:

 I went to a local car show tonight.

This '37 Caddy went cruising by.  Cannot mistake those Fisher body lines.

Jet Black, Mahogany woodgrain, Tan Bedford Cord upholstery.

 

 

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Classic.

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday August 17, 2017:  Body Update

 

 

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The yellow "self-etching" primer is now sprayed.

 

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The inside is covered and will get a coat of black, but not clear.

 

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Interior shot.

 

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Notice how the firewall data plate is masked.  Today the grey "build-up" primer will be sprayed.

Bob told me the build up primer can actually fill in all the letters and numbers and I'll lose all the data plate details.

Hopefully she's in prime by tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

 

Have a great day!

Gary

 

 


 

 

Edited by Gary W
Update body shop photos (see edit history)
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Cant wait to see it painted. Where are the rest of the parts? Hood, fenders Etc?

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23 hours ago, Gary W said:

 

A quick note about my color choice:

 I went to a local car show tonight.

This '37 Caddy went cruising by.  Cannot mistake those Fisher body lines.

Jet Black, Mahogany woodgrain, Tan Bedford Cord upholstery.

 

 

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Classic.
 

 

 

Gary, the car is obviously yours alone, and you alone should choose the color.  But I will admit that I am one of the people who has been scratching my head about your choice.  This pic of the black Caddy went a long way toward helping me to understand your choice!  Keep up the good work on both the car and this thread.  A class act from start to finish!

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Friday August 18, 2017:  Body in Grey "Build-Up" Primer

 

 

I stopped by the Paint Shop after work today.  The body is in "build-up" prime now.  Here's a few photos:

 

 

 

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Passengers side.  The door threshold came out so nice and the quarter panel patch is flawless.  Completely undetectable.

 

 

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Passenger side door jamb.  Everything came out so nice and smooth.  All the body lines are crisp and sharp. 

 

 

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Driver's side.

 

 

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Again, the patch panel repair looks awesome.

 

 

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Here you can see the "guide coat" that Bob sprays prior to sanding.  It helps detect any low spots that may need further work.  

 

 

 

 

So, going forward:  (As far as I understand the process......)

1. Raise the body off the wood dolly and support it up high so the underside can be cleaned, sanded, self-etch primed and then finished with a rubberized undercoat.

2.  Entire interior of the car will be sprayed super jet black.  (The interior will not get clear coated)

3.  Final sand (wet sand?) of the grey primer surface to achieve a super smooth surface for paint.

4.  Color coat exterior

5.  Clear coat exterior.

 

 

 

Have a good night!

Gary

 

 

 

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My understanding, subject to more investigation on my part when I'm at your stage, is that if base color is mixed with the clearcoat, you will get more of an appearance of the original paint.  The clear coat will provide depth and shine which is what you may desire.  Adding color to the clearcoat gives you the same durability as base/clear, but reduces the depth of the clear.  Just a thought to throw on the garage floor as this is what I am considering doing.

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