Gary W

1937 Buick Model 48: RESTORATION HAS BEGUN! (Photo)

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Hey Gary,

Thanks for allowing all of us to come along for the ride, its been fun!

Question - I may have missed it, but did you ever tell us whether you resolved the issue with the drivers side door handle hitting the fabric?

Thanks again

Edited by Buick 59 (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, Buick 59 said:

did you ever tell us whether you resolved the issue with the drivers side door handle hitting the fabric

 

 

I didn't get that fixed yet.  I've been pushing the fabric in while opening the door for now so it doesn't rub. 

But I guess that will be a winter project removing the door skin and hopefully figuring out why it rubs like that.  

I may start by simply switching the handles from the drivers door to the passengers door and see if that does anything.

 

Thanks so much for following along!!  Appreciate the support!

Gary

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Gary,

It is hard to feature that the handle rubs the fabric on one side.  There is a Gnome hiding in your door waiting for you to let him out.    This next year, will be you taking the family out in your spectacular Buick for a weekend drive.  Such a beautiful car only to be hung up with these last little issues.  But we all know that you will prevail.  Now if LB would just deliver the items for you to finish the interior.   

 

 Anyway,  have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

 

Randy

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Sunday December 30, 2018:  Final visit to Bob's paint shop for the hand compound and final polishing

 

I have 190 miles on her now, and Bob had a few days open in his shop schedule to get the Buick in for the last steps to finish the paint.  

There were a few touch-ups to make around the hood and a boo-boo I made in the trunk.

The most pressing issue for me was the hood alignment at the front.

So over the last few days, Bob fixed all that stuff and I got her back this afternoon.

 

(Disclaimer:  I had a REAL TOUGH time trying to resize photos tonight!  I took hours trying to get these on the site)

 

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Back in Bob's shop for the final paint work.

 

 

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Here's the front end and the hood (mis)alignment.  I just couldn't stand the way it all lined up.

 

 

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And touch-up work needed on the forward edges of the hood where it meets the front clip.

 

 

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As always, Bob takes his time and evaluates every inch of the car.  

 

 

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I caught him doing a little fine touch-up on the inner surface of the trunk lid.  I like watching the technique.

 

 

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After the front edges were all touched up.  Now she's ready for the hand compounding.

 

 

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Using this 3M product, Bob hand-rubbed the entire car, starting with the roof.

After all that labor, the car then got a finish coat of wax.

All the labor done by hand, no machine for this final stage.

 

 

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She looked just beautiful inside the shop under the lamps.....

 

 

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..... and looked even better outside!

 

 

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The front hood / grille area lines up so much better now!  The gaps look great on both sides.

(I'm really sorry for the poor quality of these photos....  some are dropped down to 218KB.... )

 

 

 

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I took my nephew out for a 20-mile run!  So much fun.

 

 

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2-years ago he was two.

 

 

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Now he's four and loves the cars.

 

 

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Have a great night out there!

 

 

 

I wish you all a very Happy and Healthy New Year!!

 

 

Gary

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 Lovely looking car. I'm one of the many following the story of the restoration, and the quality of the work is superb.

 Thanks for sharing the story of this car with all of us.

 Happy New Year to Everyone!

 Keith

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 Gary you and Bob did a fantastic job. You have another car in your stable to enjoy and be proud of. Thanks for taking us along on the ride.

 

Here's to many miles and years of ownership. Happy New Year!

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Looking great, Gary.  I'm so glad to see that you eliminated that hood gap problem before the end of the year -- now you can truly enjoy your New Year's celebration tonight!  😉 Thank you again for sharing this wonderful project with us.

Edited by neil morse (see edit history)
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Gary, like many others on this site I have been silently watching this thread and have been throughly impressed by the dedication to having this restoration done in such short order and so well documented.  Well done.  Would love to see it in person.  Leon

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Congratulations, Gary.  Whenever I make a repair I ask myself how would Gary do it and refer to your thread.  Please everyone post here occasionally to keep it current and available as a valuable resource.

 

Thanks again, Gary V 

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Now it truly is a HAPPY NEW YEAR ! ! !   What a saga that we all have been watching.  Professional shops could not have done a better job.  Your attention to the most minute details really inspire me to do a better job. 

 

I learned from you one major lesson.  Plan, plan, plan.  Some times, I just take the item apart only to be stymied by some glitch like misplacing a small component and wondering where the H--- I placed it.  From now on, my workshop will be like a Swiss watch factory.................CLEAN and organized.  You inspired and impressed us all with your cleanliness and meticulous attention to the details.  A lesson for us all.

 

Having a three car garage that you worked in and not a "shop" really awed us.  To have done this remarkable job in your garage boggles the mind. 

And the results are stunning.   

 

I watch Antiques Roadshow on PBS on occasion.  In the beginning of the show, they have in their intro  scenes of St. Louis and on the curb is none other than your car.......................a 1937 Buick.  Black two door to boot.  SO..... you are in possession of a "star" ! !  

 

 

Mrs. W and the family must be very proud of your work too.  Now for warm weather to take this gracious beauty out for a ride in the surrounding countryside.  

 

Thank you for sharing this great story and I too have learned from you and your methods.  A big shout out to the Buick Owners of America.  Seems like a great group of people who were there to assist in your work.  

 

Have a Happy, Healthy,  Prosperous  New Year, Gary.

 

P.S.  We cannot wait to see your next "rescue".  As young as you are, you have a lot of years (and cars)  to restore.  What will be your next one?   

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Thanks for all the nice compliments.

 I'm so happy that you guys find value in my work.

 

The next car I would love to own would be 

a convertible model Buick of the same vintage.

1937 or 1938 Buick Model 66-C.    Keep that between us for now!

Of course, I need garage space so that will most likely be the first step.

Thanks for all your help throughout this journey!

I've made some really great friends here, and appreciate the camaraderie.

 

Respectfully,

Gary

 

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On 1/1/2019 at 11:11 AM, Gary W said:

Thanks for all the nice compliments.

 I'm so happy that you guys find value in my work.

 

The next car I would love to own would be 

a convertible model Buick of the same vintage.

1937 or 1938 Buick Model 66-C.    Keep that between us for now!

Of course, I need garage space so that will most likely be the first step.

 

Thanks for all your help throughout this journey!

I've made some really great friends here, and appreciate the camaraderie.

 

Respectfully,

Gary

 

What a great journey you’ve taken us on Gary-  down the throwback memory lanes of travel years gone by, in real time. 

Thanks for the incredible ride brother! 

What an amazing transformation!

Drive her well and driver her often...

 

“Get’cher motor runnin’,

head out on the highway...”

KRW

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On 3/15/2017 at 6:37 PM, Gary W said:

Spent the day wire-wheeling a bucket of nuts, bolts, lock washers, and... the drag link, master cylinder, the brake and clutch pedal, stabilizer connections.....  

Then cleaned them with acetone and sprayed them gloss black.  Have to spray them in small batches, too cold outside so quick spray and immediately back into the garage.

 

AMAZING how nice the parts look just using the wire wheel!  

 

 

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Your attention to detail is 2nd to none!

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Sunday January 20, 2019:  Hand Throttle  (Part One)
 

 

Today I spent a couple of hours in the garage hooking up the hand throttle pull so it operates as designed.  

Being mine was rusted and broken and could not be re-used, I had to be a little creative to get everything working.

In the end, it all works as it should.

 

 

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Two years ago, removing the unit from the back of the dash panel.  Everything was hopelessly rusted solid.

 

 

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I bought this generic choke cable at NAPA auto parts.

Turns out, all I actually used was a 36" section of the casing and the wire that runs inside it.

 

 

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Remove the pull knob.  Mine was not attached to anything so it slid right out.  Then remove the nut and washer from inside the dash and slide out the face and the tube.

 

 

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Here's the guts on the bench.    Couple of issues here:

1.  The "tube" that holds the outer casing firm was split down the side.

2. The pull knob unit is broken at the end where the inner wire attaches.

 

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Using wire, I made some preliminary measurements from the inside of the dash to the throttle linkage.

Pull the wire out from the casing.

 

 

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Lock the outer casing in the vise and cut to the required length.  I cut it to 36", disregarding all the rest of the stuff attached to it.

 

 

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Dress it smooth with the file as the hacksaw makes it pretty messy.

 

 

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To help attach the outer casing to the dash "tube", I used this JB Weld epoxy.

 

 

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You can see the split, so I inserted the knob just so I knew how far the casing can go in.

Then, I used the epoxy around the casing and basically "screwed" it down into position.

Once coated and seated, I pressed the split tight in the vise to aid in retention.

Set this aside now that the 36" casing is attached to the dash tube.

 

Part 2: the dash knob and final installation.

 

 

 

 

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Sunday January 20, 2019:  Hand Throttle  (Part Two)

 

 

With the dash attachment done, I started on the pull knob.

The wire that runs inside the outer casing is firmly attached to this pull knob.

 

 

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Here's the problem.  The end that the wire attaches to is broken.

So what I did here is

 

 

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Drilled a 1/16" hole through the remaining metal at the end of the part.

 

 

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I bent the wire 90 degrees.

 

 

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This way, there was a mechanical "Lock" to attach the two.  Next, I cut the protruding end down so it stood just a bit proud when the wire was moved.

I was going to solder it together, but I realized that once its in the tube, there is no room for it to move and it should stay secure.

The tube keeps the wire centered in position.

Now, simply slide this wire through the outer casing...

 

 

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Back to the car, begin sliding the finished casing through the dash panel.

 

 

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Slip on your mounting hardware before running it through the firewall.

Tighten it up behind the dash, then run the casing through the firewall pad and into the engine bay.

 

 

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The casing came through the firewall above the voltage regulator (I don't know if that is correct, but there were holes already punched, so I used them).

Then the casing routes down the firewall and clips just before it attaches to the throttle linkage.

With the dash knob pushed in fully, pull up the little lever arm and attach the inner wire.

 

I didn't start it today because it's pouring out, but I did roll the window down and watch the action as I pulled it out and it moves the throttle plate on the carburetor so I think it'll work just fine.

 

 

 

Have a great night!

Gary

Edited by Gary W (see edit history)
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