Richard Gallatin

Wrapped 1950 Studebaker by Christo

Recommended Posts

....Come to anyone's car garage to see cars with car covers on...duh

 

I guess I am in the "dumb and unwashed" group.. :)   I never "got it" on his wrapping projects, especially the group of islands he wrapped rings around.  But, he's making big bucks somehow..

 

Some "artists" do get called out by the public, like some guy named Andre' I believe, got stupid money many decades ago to "do art" on a small grassed triangle strip of city land in Hartford Ct.  He bought some round boulders at a gravel pit and aligned them in a triangle, may have taken the skill and talent of a 6 year old to come up with that.   The taxpayers had to pay the fee.  I think the State lottery grand prize back then was 50k, and this guy got a LOT more than that.  There was a huge protest by the vocal taxpayers, to no avail.

 

.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard, is this "wrapping" of a Studebaker

something new, or artwork that was done 

many years ago?  The artist Christo Javacheff has been

around for years (whether or not he's still active), doing

much of the same thing.  Surely he has more talent than that!

 

The website says, "Sculptures by Christo and

partner Jeanne-Claude force observers to 

question the nature of art."  No, we know 

what is art.  And we know what is NOT art!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LINC400 said:

I could use him to wrap my barbeque grill and patio furniture until spring.

 

Yes, he would be good at that!

According to Wikipedia, this was one of his projects:

 

 

junk--Christo wrapped furniture.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So a couple of French guys were sitting around and one says "You know how popular Rap is in America."

 

The same thing happened in the movies. Foreign directors were told, in English, that the climax was at the end of the movie. Now every action movie you watch has the bad guy "climb" a building, stairs. whatever right at the end.

 

Foreign stuff in America.

Bernie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/7/2017 at 7:55 AM, Curti said:

I don't get it !

 

DITTO THAT!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back when Chrito was active, our regional gallery here in Australia aquired one of his more modest 'artworks'. When the crate arrived, two part-time workers took it out and unwrapped it. They were perplexed to find nothing more than a few thin sticks...................or so the story went.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Without getting into the entire "beauty in the eye of the beholder" debate;

a few years ago I toured the Getty Museum in Los Angeles with a friend. While I had more appreciation for the classics (paintings, sculpture, etc.) she was more into the avant garde movement like Pollock and more abstract pieces. We did end up having the "what is consideted art" debate.  I finally came up with this analogy: If you took all these pieces and moved them to various city dumps around the nation, and laid them on top of a rubbish pile, anyone would instantly recognise a classic painting or marble sculpture as being out of place. However the avant garde pieces or even those of Pollock could be passed over by tens of thousands who would only see them as blending perfectly with the trash heap. 

I think this parallels F&J's post above when viewing a simple triangle of rocks when compared with, say the Easter Island sculptures or Stonehenge. One shows a level of skill any neophyte  could recognize while the other would appear to be a haphazard jumble done by children.

In short, I don't see the wrapped cars as "art" either. :lol:

 

Edited by GregLaR (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, GregLaR said:

Without getting into the entire "beauty in the eye of the beholder" debate;

a few years ago I toured the Getty Museum in Los Angeles with a friend. While I had more appreciation for the classics (paintings, sculpture, etc.) she was more into the avant garde movement like Pollock and more abstract pieces. We did end up having the "what is consideted art" debate.  I finally came up with this analogy: If you took all these pieces and moved them to various city dumps around the nation, and laid them on top of a rubbish pile, anyone would instantly recognise a classic painting or marble sculpture as being out of place. However the avant garde pieces or even those of Pollock could be passed over by tens of thousands who would only see them as blending perfectly with the trash heap. 

I think this parallels F&J's post above when viewing a simple triangle of rocks when compared with, say the Easter Island sculptures or Stonehenge. One shows a level of skill any neophyte  could recognize while the other would appear to be a haphazard jumble done by children.

In short, I don't see the wrapped cars as "art" either. :lol:

 

That's very well put.

It made me realize;

Cars should be unwrapped to be appreciated as art

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We went to a Degas exhibit a few years ago and waited, patiently, by a sign "Refrain from Smoking". We thought some music would be nice with the dancer pictures.

Bernie

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

We went to a Degas exhibit a few years ago and waited, patiently, by a sign "Refrain from Smoking". We thought some music would be nice with the dancer pictures.

Bernie

:lol: That's pretty clever!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can take credit for making the Degas exhibit a success (and resolving an issue with the mummy display at the same time). But the corny joke came from a record my Great Grandfather left us when he died in 1956.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The minimalistic approach to the, "Wrapped Roadmistress," (2001), is emboldened by the majestic drama of the applied Tangerine Sweepspear. Meant to illuminate and remind the viewer of the eternal human struggle, its vivid red signifies the blood spilled in the name of corporate ruthlessness, exemplified by the complementary, mint-condition Texaco roundel, circa 1955. 

 

An ephemeral work created by the artists Bowman and Gibson (both are graduates with a BS from the Wauwatosa Conservatory of Fine Art), the installation's transparent upper section provides the viewer with a glimpse of the raw sexual energy of the '57 Buick Roadmaster Riviera Sedan, without revealing the lower body's ultimate curvaceousness. 

 

Limited-edition, life-size prints of the work are available at your local Banana Republic, upon sealed-bid application. 

 

TG

57 SweepSpear 2001X.jpg

Edited by TG57Roadmaster (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now