JoelsBuicks

Finishing my Buick Shop

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Lamar, you're obviously no stranger to this game!  There are two mitre saws set up, at the moment, to cut exactly 16'.  But to cut the truss chords they were set to cut the required angles and length.  As you pointed out, the angle at the lower end of the top chord is too low to cut on the mitre saw.  So, it gets manually cut with a barrel saw to 18.43 degrees for a 4-12 pitch.

 

The saws come in handy for making most of the cuts on the shorter 2x4 braces inside the truss.

 

A little trig goes a long way when figuring out this stuff.  I'm glad I paid attention in that class.

 

Thanks again,

Joel

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Keep posting the progress.

It is always interesting to see how others build things and in almost every case decisions are made around the available materials.  You are fortunate to have the sawmill and we are all waiting to see how the shop progresses.

Good luck with the retirement, I can tell you from experience that I got more done at home when I worked than I seem to do now in retirement.

When I first retired, I spent half the time on a project, fixing damaged or broken tools that I had been using that way because I did not have time to fix the tool and get the job done.

The end of March, I am completing 19 years of retirement.......with a ultimate goal of being retired as long as I worked

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My shop is located just a few miles from an Amish community.  In the last twenty years or more there are several families that have  added to their farming income by doing work for locals, especially carpentry and construction of metal buildings.  

 

Yesterday I drove (in my 60 Electra BTW) to see Henry who finished my wood shop for me a few years ago.  I made a deal with him to finish my new shop.  He'll start in about a month.  He and his crew are hardworking craftsmen and this will be a softball pitch right up their power alley.  

 

More re shots of wood below:

 

 

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56 minutes ago, JoelsBuicks said:

Lamar, you're obviously no stranger to this game!  There are two mitre saws set up, at the moment, to cut exactly 16'.  But to cut the truss chords they were set to cut the required angles and length.  As you pointed out, the angle at the lower end of the top chord is too low to cut on the mitre saw.  So, it gets manually cut with a barrel saw to 18.43 degrees for a 4-12 pitch.

 

The saws come in handy for making most of the cuts on the shorter 2x4 braces inside the truss.

 

A little trig goes a long way when figuring out this stuff.  I'm glad I paid attention in that class.

 

Thanks again,

Joel

 

18.43* eh, I was about to say that had to take some trig but can you seriously set that on a barrel saw. How old is your barrel saw? Have only ever seen one and it was huge and old at an old lumber yard, is that what you have? Pictures please!

 

geometry was fun, trig, not!  totally ruined my summer school experience and only passed because the pretty teacher liked me. 

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Not sure why I call it a barrel saw but it's nothing more than a worm drive skilsaw.

 

Those boards on the trailer are ripped on an angle and will sit atop the supporting walls and will hold up the 2x8 rafters.  I'm lazy and didn't want to notch the rafters and I think notching takes away some of the strength.  I cut that angle on my 20" band saw fitted with an aggressive blade.

 

I will need nearly three hundred feet.

 

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The sawmill got a new set of teeth yesterday.  I'm posting some

closeup pics of the 48" blade, also called a circle saw or just "the saw."  A saw wrench removes the crescent shaped shank which wedges in place and holds the tooth, also called a bit.  

 

These are high speed steel bits and are easily knocked down by nails.  To sharpen them, just use a flat file.  If it's damaged severely or if several bits get knocked down, it's time for a new set.  

 

A new bit is about 10/32" wide at the tip and the saw plate is about 1/8" thick at the outside but nearly double that at the eye (center). The kerf must be wider than the saw to keep the saw from rubbing in the log side.  Rubbing makes heat and heat causes the saw to lose its tension.

 

Im trying to get used to being retired.  Ok so far but less than a week into it.

 

Thanks!   -Joel

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by JoelsBuicks (see edit history)
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Hummmmmmm, we use to drive 60d nails and railroad spikes in pp bases for bench marks, ever have to pull any of them out? 

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I ran up on some 8" beveled Cypress that had been sawed (or is it sawn) 35 years ago and stored in an old sawmill. Loved the saw blade cuts that were left in the wood. Many looked like this 

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with the cuts appearing to be going in both directions, bet you can explain that?

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 10:52 PM, JoelsBuicks said:

Im trying to get used to being retired.  Ok so far but less than a week into it.

 

Congratulation!  And thanks for the lesson on the saw blade.  I was wondering about replacing the tips when you mentioned it previously.  How old is that Mill again? 

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That's some beautiful cypress.  It's called wood of the Pharoahs as it was the wood of choice for burial coffins - it is rot resistant.  It is also stable, strong and lightweight.  When used on the exterior, it will turn gray and remain sound for more than a hundred years.

 

The sawmill that sawed those boards had a couple minor issues.  First, at least one tooth was knocked to the side and caused the exacerbated saw mark that is repeated every revolution.  Second, the reverse saw mark pattern can be one of two problems.  Most likely, the saw has a slight wobble and it touches the logside of the wood as it passes the backside of the saw.

 

One thing you can do is turn the board over and see if that pattern is on both sides.  My guess is that it's not.

 

I have never sawed a railroad spike but I have sawed several of those white porcelain electrical insulators grown into a tree.  They are extremely hard and will wreck a set of teeth.

 

Take care,

Joel

 

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Sorry John, didn't see your question while I was replying.  My guess is that the saw works is about 1925.  That would include the carriage and drive mechanics. The engine is 1950 international six cylinder.  

 

I replaced the original structural wood wood with steel.

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Visiting inlaws in Yankton this week.  Here's some pics of shop progress;  we'll get back to it after we spend a day in Chickasha.

 

The stud walls will form two internal rooms each the same size, about 18.5' x 25'.  Both will be climate controlled; one for a living area and the other for a work room, capable of accommodating a buick.  There will be a half vaulted ceiling and storage above the flat portion, about 16' wide and 38' long.

 

Hopefully I'll have more to share soon.

-Joel

 

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Hmmmm, what's this, dude retires and all of a sudden the work stops, weird:D

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4 hours ago, MrEarl said:

Hmmmm, what's this, dude retires and all of a sudden the work stops, weird:D

 

 Looked for him at Chickasha. If he was there, we did not make contact.

 

  Ben

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I can see that although I'm now retired, I get no breaks from you guys.  A few days ago, I attempted to post a video of the mill in action but the file was way too big.

 

I was in Chickasha with my brother, we are the two tallest in the pic.  I asked two people for Ben and neither knew you.  I was gonna ask the guy with the 50 Buick on his shirt but he was in deep conversation. Later I read he was you!  I'll be honest about Chickasha and say that Buick parts were elusive.  I did score a 31 headlight with a good solid bezel.  There'll need to be a good reason for me to return.  Maybe I just need to learn how to shop these meets.

 

i got shop progress to report, see next post.

 

Thanks,

Joel

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"What a difference a day makes; 24 little hours...."  Well, my Amish framing crew showed up!  They started Tuesday, got rained out Wednesday, and worked a full day today.  I can't say enough good things about these folks.  I grew up amongst them but they pretty much keep to themselves.  After all these years, it's still an interesting experience. By the way, they are fascinated with the sawmill. 

 

I'll let the pics speak to the progress.  I won't photograph their face, respecting their beliefs. 

 

 

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Today I ordered my metal.  It will be 26 gauge R-panel.  There are numerous pieces of all kinds of panels and trim material that are needed. I spent a full half of two days with the 'parts list' and then a full hour with a consultant that works for the metal supplier. And, don't forget the stuff like tape seal, urethane closure material, and gobs of lap and structural screws. I read several spec and installation  bulletins and still feel ignorant about it.  Truthfully, this isn't much fun to me, especially with so many Buicks waiting.

 

Oh, I forgot to mention that I ordered the insulation today.  It's 3" with the white vinyl back for the roof only.  The good news is that they cut to your specified length.  Bad news is that's another hour of calculating. 

 

This will all go fast now.

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Today's progress included the raising of the south wall and parts of the end walls. 2x8 rafters were placed and quite a few sheathing boards were nailed on.  The building was straightened with a stringlike and cross braced in several spots. 

 

 

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Looking AWESOME Joel! Only one of the roof raising/truss setting??

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