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Stearns Knight


alsancle
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The bumper sticker is directly related to the smoke screen behind the car when Art owned it. We have that fixed now...........It’s kind of funny having a no smoking sign above the hood of that car in the garage!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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On 12/5/2020 at 7:15 PM, Cookie Man said:

Thanks AJ!

.

 

Darryl,  those are the only shots that show the garage.   Most of the pictures Mark gave me are detail shots of the Brunn.   On that note,  does your car have the same bent shifter?    I think Brunn lengthened the cowl 4 or 5 inches and the bent shifter is one of the accomodations to make it work.

 

 

DSC01621.JPG

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I'm working on a J right now and took out the steering column cover to get it plated. The measurement from the top of the tube to the top side of the column mount was 12 5/8". The measurement to the "boot" at the floor was 26 3/4" (same as an H). However The J column tube is 1 1/4" SHORTER than the tube on the H (dash to wheel).  The J chassis is 8" longer than the H, and the J sedan body is 13" longer. In the attempt to make room for the jump seats the front seat of the J is moved forward, thus the shorter column (pity the driver). Well, the purpose of this ramble is to give you info to determine if the cowl is indeed longer on the Brunn.  None of the other H or J cars I have seen have the bent shift lever. Perhaps the bent shifter is to give more room between it and the seat cushion? Lots of mysteries.

IMG_20200727_143705908.jpg

IMG_20200727_143720008.jpg

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From past experience, Gemmer steering boxes were very modular and could be assembled with different length steering columns. Stutz, Pierce, and L-29 Cord had different lengths depending on body application on thr 215 series boxes used from 1929-1933. It would have been routine to get a special length for the custom coach builders in the era. Also, they would have been experts at placement and modifications in the build to prevent things from getting screwed up..............that said, I have never studied one off cars to figure out where and how they made changes. I know for certain on ALL Pierce Arrows there was never a modification to the frame from the cowl forward..........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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If you pull the cosmetic colmun do NOT make any adjustments to the box. It's a fairly big can of worms you open when you dissassembel a box. Just pulling the wheel is involved, and if the pot metal parts brake......you're going to have to cast them...........and they are held in with pinch bolts, so failure is very very possible.  Been there, done that.

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11 hours ago, Mark66A said:

I'm working on a J right now and took out the steering column cover to get it plated. The measurement from the top of the tube to the top side of the column mount was 12 5/8". The measurement to the "boot" at the floor was 26 3/4" (same as an H). However The J column tube is 1 1/4" SHORTER than the tube on the H (dash to wheel).  The J chassis is 8" longer than the H, and the J sedan body is 13" longer. In the attempt to make room for the jump seats the front seat of the J is moved forward, thus the shorter column (pity the driver). Well, the purpose of this ramble is to give you info to determine if the cowl is indeed longer on the Brunn.  None of the other H or J cars I have seen have the bent shift lever. Perhaps the bent shifter is to give more room between it and the seat cushion? Lots of mysteries.

 

 

So Mark,  are you saying that the J cars actually have less space in the front seat than the H cars?

 

If you get a chance,  measure the length of the cowl from the edge of the hood to the windshield and we will ask Ed to do that with my car.    A custom body builder trick was to extend the cowl 4 or 5 inches into the passenger compartment.   Typically the space would be eaten up between the dash and steering wheel.   My Reo is like this and your knuckles almost touch the windshield when turning the wheel.

 

Here is a better shot from Mark's batch showing the shifter and steering column on my car.

DSC01616.JPG

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53 minutes ago, Cookie Man said:

The shifter on mine is not bent.

Mark:

How did you remove the steering column, I would like to have mine plated as well.

Thanks

IMG_1307.JPG

 

I like the black dash!    Darryl,  your emergency brake lever is different than mine.   Also, did your car originally have a rug?  I wonder what mine looks like underneath the rug.

 

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I had the leather repaired and have been using every kind of leather conditioner available. It worked on the back of the seat, door panels, and ceiling but the bottom cushion was beyond help. Every time I got into the front seat it would crack or tear some more. I got it reupholstered but haven't taken any photos yet. The new upholstery looks...well, NEW. I hope with age it will look more like the rest of the leather. 

Edited by pughs (see edit history)
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I have been working on my oil pump problem for the last few weeks and with a lot of helpful advice and a new gear from Mark Young I am almost done. The bolts at the back of the pan are hidden behind a cross-member. Mark said that I should remove the cross member.  I was on my back under the car. The caps unbolted and came off easily but the cross member wouldn’t budge. I hit it with a rubber mallet to no avail. Finally, I got out from under and while looking at the engine from above I realized I could see the cross member peeking out just behind the engine splash apron. Using a tire iron pressed against the cross member and tapping the tire iron a few times on each side with a hammer, the cross member dropped out easily. I removed the pan without any difficulty. I then marked the orientation of the bottom plate of the oil pump and removed it. It was immediately obvious as to why I had no oil pressure. The pot metal gear had dissolved into a paste-like goo. I cleaned the bottom plate and installed the new bronze gear that I got from Mark. The new gear wouldn't turn. I filed the edges and the gear would turn but was rubbing hard against the crescent shaped wall. I put magic marker ink on the tops of each gear and turned it passed the wall. The high marks showed where they rubbed on the gear. I filed the flat ends of the gears very slightly where they rubbed and the gear finally turned freely. The big gear wouldn't come out of the oil pump so I removed the oil pump and with a long screw driver tapped the gear down the shaft until it finally came out. There was some of the pot metal paste gunking up the gear which was pretty easily cleaned up with some fine steel wool. I went to put the gear back in the oil pump body but it wouldn't go in. I measured the shaft on the gear and it was slightly tapered, being wider where the slot was by a couple of thousandths. I put it in a vice and applied pressure and re-miced it several times until the taper was gone. The gear then fit back in the oil pump body properly. I made a gasket and reassembled the oil pump. I tested it with the long screw driver down the shaft and into the slot to be sure everything turned without binding. I put the oil pump back in the engine. I ordered Glyptal and sent the pan to be power washed.  I got the pan back and it is clean and I am waiting for the Glyptal to arrive so I can paint the inside of the pan. The power washing removed most of the original Glyptal. A special thanks to Mark Young for his help and advice.

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

AJ, that curved shift rod and its collar--and the knob--look for all the world like those on 1936-38 Pierces.....


 

Best part of the car! 😇

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That coming from a guy leaning on a lime green Cadillac with asinine white walls and lime green pants that match........to quote a famous movie line from 16 candles when describing a young mans outfit to the police........they asked......”is he retarded.” 🤣

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13 minutes ago, Grimy said:

Ed, you've been doing more to that car than you've yet billed AJ for, right?


 

Yes.....but don’t worry, I’m short of funds for the Modoc tour next year. His next invoice will include sticker shock.........someone has to foot the bill for the White coming out west! 👍

 

I will give AJ a “Thank You” in advance.

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To remove the tube over the column: First remove throttle and advance levers from shafts at bottom of column. Remove headlight switch and cut the horn wire (splice it back together at reassembly. Push shafts up into the steering box. Go inside the car and see that the levers and horn button are moved out of the steering wheel. Pull them all the way out - be careful with the bakelite levers - or remove them - wire springs hold them onto the rods.  Careful with horn button spring and parts inside. Now take out screws at bottom of steering wheel.  Set it aside and now remove nut holding on the aluminum hub the wheel was screwed to and remove it. (don't loose the half round key). Unbolt the column support under the dash. Pull off the tube. Then take off the column support and boot at the base. Simple, eh?

Yes J cars are a bit tighter for the driver. Per data book distance from wheel to seat back cushion on H- 13.5", J- 13, All weather Cabriiolet -12, All weather Town Brougham -12.

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12 hours ago, Mark66A said:

Yes J cars are a bit tighter for the driver. Per data book distance from wheel to seat back cushion on H- 13.5", J- 13, All weather Cabriiolet -12, All weather Town Brougham -12.

 

Mark, do you think that measurement is horizontal from the bottom of the wheel (which would be closest) directly to the center of the seat?   I'll get Eddy to measure our car.

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Cowl measurement hood edge to windshield 18 1/2" on both an H and a J.  I noticed Mr. Cookie's car has a diamond dash decal. in 28 and 29 Stearns used two different decal designs. A large one on the dash and smaller ones on the wood trim below the door windows. I have not figured out why. Both decals are used on the H and J cars. I at first thought J had the diamond and H had the wings. I did a small survey of the cars and I was wrong. Also it is not dependent on the year or body style. Perhaps just something to confuse us 90+ years later.  Also those with an oil filter, and not the rectifier had a Tillotson decal on the filter.  Here are photos. I had them all reproduced as water transfer decals. (none left).  AJ is right on where the measurement is for driver space. Unfortunate that we are now larger and attempting to fit in these older cars.

06-10 001.jpg

Final Diamond Logo.jpg

Final Wings Logo.jpg

H Dash.JPG

Tillotson Oil Filter Decal Final.jpg

Edited by Mark66A
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  • 3 weeks later...
Just now, John_Mereness said:

Big car and needs a big radiator mascot (remember you are now cheerleader and ambassador for Stearns ownership as few are ever seen in public)  - you will grow to love it over time !!!


If the Knight doesn’t stay on top of the radiator, it’s going on MY shelf. Just saying. 🤫

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