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Does having a rare car help or hurt the value of the vehicle?


marage95

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Not sure why anyone on this board would be offended by someone asking "what is it worth"?

 

Ive done it many times myself and have collected cars for over 40 years. One cant know every marque and often to a newbie, it is an honest question- not a "let me see how much money you have" question.

 

and yes, most cars are under 100k, so no big deal...............

 

Also, a Stutz may have been 100k 3 years ago and today 300k........... things change constantly in the field of cars, desirability, etc.  10 years ago one could buy a 280sl for perhaps 10k. today you are looking at 45k.

 

I dont find it offensive at all, just inquisitive and am glad that there is any interest whatsoever..........

 

banter is better then silence.

 

my opinion.

 

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Am not offended either but remember when Henry Manny wrote an article about being sad that his 427 Cobra had become too valuable to drive. Think if that ever happened to one of my cars, I'd sell because I have enough trophies/coffee tables.

 

Is the nice thing about my '92 built GTP. With a 7,000 rpm redline and a five speed it is a fun car and only have about $4k in it. And I just found a simple way to get another 60hp (GM had a long history of detuning and underrating interesting engines (i.e.67 Firebird 400 carb tab) & didn't want a W car that could outrun a 'vette).

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Americans seem to be unique in our aversion to discussing financial matters. I had a conversation recently with a pair of gentlemen from Spain in my showroom and they were only too happy to tell me what they paid for their cars, how much of their salary it was (I was shocked by how little a dentist in Spain makes), and it seemed like no big deal. Likewise a friend from Germany who says that everyone in a company knows what everyone else makes, it's common knowledge and they talk about it. In fact, he says he would feel strange not knowing what his co-workers make because it would hinder him when it was time to negotiate his pay rate--he would never know if he asked for enough. Why give that advantage to your employer? was his thought.

 

We are unique in our reluctance to discuss financial matters. Why, I don't know. I feel the same, it makes me uncomfortable, but when I examine why, I can't come up with a logical or reasonable explanation. So odd we are as a country, no?

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Rarity came up in some of my first talks with my Grandfather about selling cars. I was just turning 13 at the time and he had to tell me that my commission on car sales was being reduced to 5% from 10%.

 

The outcome, rarity is a key fundamental of the eternal search for the uninformed buyer, a life's work.

diogenes-dog-and-lamp-statue.jpg

 

It ranks with "Sharp" "Like New" "Clean" and other broadcasts found on the windshields of cars.

 

I sold a rare car about a year ago. I advertised it as "Very rough". The only communication with the buyer was two offers of a lower than asking price. I accepted the second. When he got the car he told me "he didn't think it would be that rough. I wondered if I should have described it as "very, very rough". He only asked if he could get it for less. Maybe rarity should be graded as rare, very rare, very very rare and so on.

 

Or was "beware" misheard as "be rare"?

 

Buying and selling collector cars with discretionary money is SPORT and it always will be.

Bernie

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20 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

It's all a matter of supply and demand. A car of which there are thousands, could be 'rare' because it is in high demand. A car of which there are only a few, could be worth very little because there is no demand.

Do you think that the word rare can be implied as a status symbol? For example, if I see my neighbor washing his 57 Cadillac Coupe de Ville (23813) I can say “Nice car, but I have a 57 Cadillac Eldorado (2100)."

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Taken as you wrote it, "rare cares," you may be correct.  If you meant to say "rare cars," a host of Pebble Beach judges would disagree...  Happy Thanksgiving anyway....

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There aren't too many cars rarer and more desirable to high end collectors than the Type 42 Bugatti Royale. Fifteen years ago it was hailed as the world's most expensive car and one was offered for sale for $10,000,000. There were supposedly only six made and if you happened to uncover a seventh and decided to sell it there were would be an incredible global feeding frenzy among the wealthiest collectors. There might not be dozens of buyers but there would be plenty with very deep pockets.    

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The highest value almost invariably rests with the most desirable version of a relatively common item whether it is rare or not. Hence, the much higher value placed on roadsters over sedans... the sedans invariably were more expensive but they are not particularly desirable in the show-off collector world. The best Packard Limo in the world might be rare, but nowhere near as desirable as the most common roadster.

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Year, make, model, production numbers, body style, options, condition, history and cool factor. All will play a part in the value. Money to invest determines a lot, if working with a high budget when purchasing a car. You will over look lesser value models. If building/restoring a car, a person will want to do the model that has a higher finished value. Once again over looking lesser models. What is the curve ball in the whole thing is association. If you went fishing with your dad when you were a kid, and drove out to the river or lake in a 52 ford truck. there is a good chance that you will place a higher personal value on a old 52 ford truck then a Delahaye.

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