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1948 New Yorker 2 year road trip


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So, here is how this came about.... the first picture is of a valve on the side of the block to get to the coolant fluid. I don't know if its standard equipment but it's always been there,  anyway I needed to drain some coolant to install the thermocouple switch for the electric fan, so instead of getting coolant everywhere I just stuck a hose on it and drained it right into a bucket! Easy! No mess! Then came my first oil change on this car!!!! (I started it up with some brand new but cheap oil after all the work just to flush things through a bit) As you all know you have to drain the filter housing before you can remove the filter or you just get oil EVERYWHERE, problem is draining the housing is also a pain in the ass and you get oil everywhere ANYWAY! The nut sits awkwardly at the bottom, you can't get a pan in there, getting a funnel is no good either, a small container works but then it fills up and you have to plug the hole to do it again.... wowza... so you end up getting oil all over the place anyway, or at least I do... So I took a look at my previous "fix it" solution and off to the parts store, one small brass valve and a bit of hose, no more oil everywhere...... Easy oil changes from now on!

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So because I just can't leave well enough alone....(absolutely no evidence of that on previous pages) Naturally I decided to go and put a drain hose on the bottom of the radiator as well. I hate messy fluids going places I don't want them to go.....To be fair the new AC rad was kinda in the way of the old stop valve. (two quick bolts and it's off and can easily be moved out of the way.... but hey I was on a roll!) So, a small brass pipe to extend it past the new AC rad, another valve and some more hose! Next rad flush and drain will be a breeze!

 

the old valve just moved the fluid out the wingnut part, that would just not do I'm afraid :)

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OK, here we go again.... tires.... I got a lot of great input from you guys, and Yes the car has 8.20 15's on right now, I believe it was common for folks to put them on a number of models. However I have my shop manual and that shows a 7.50 15 as the original tire size. The 8.20 15 is a gigantic wheel that stands 30" tall and in today's sizes translates to a 235-75-15, this is also a big wide tire. The 7.50's are more of a 225-75-15, a bit smaller at about 28" diameter.

Width wise, the 8.20's at about 9" wide rubs on the inside fender-wells at the back, will going down in size closer to the original be a bit better for towing since its a slightly smaller tire? or do any of you guys run a 235-75-15 and how does it do? 

Lastly, Diamondback is going to be my wheel of choice, the whitewall and tire quality is fantastic, but only AFTER the trip! For the trip I decided to go with a light truck tire that is 6 or maybe even 8-ply rated, just to make sure it can handle the load and road conditions all the way south.  I will put the pretty wheels on when we get back.

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Not sure what you guys have found but the new NAPA 1062 filter that is supposed to be a replacement for the 8cl oil filter does not seal properly, that cock ring is just ever so slightly too small and the face on the filter housing and cap just don't seal properly. The old Baldwin P60 works better. Off to ebay to find a few P60's I guess.  The local parts store was no help as per usual....

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2 hours ago, 48NWYKR said:

OK, here we go again.... tires.... I got a lot of great input from you guys, and Yes the car has 8.20 15's on right now, I believe it was common for folks to put them on a number of models. However I have my shop manual and that shows a 7.50 15 as the original tire size. The 8.20 15 is a gigantic wheel that stands 30" tall and in today's sizes translates to a 235-75-15, this is also a big wide tire. The 7.50's are more of a 225-75-15, a bit smaller at about 28" diameter.

Width wise, the 8.20's at about 9" wide rubs on the inside fender-wells at the back, will going down in size closer to the original be a bit better for towing since its a slightly smaller tire? or do any of you guys run a 235-75-15 and how does it do? 

Lastly, Diamondback is going to be my wheel of choice, the whitewall and tire quality is fantastic, but only AFTER the trip! For the trip I decided to go with a light truck tire that is 6 or maybe even 8-ply rated, just to make sure it can handle the load and road conditions all the way south.  I will put the pretty wheels on when we get back.

 

I doubt 75 series tires are going to be what you want. They will be even wider than what you have at the same height. The old number sizes changed in 1965 from about a 90 aspect ratio to an 80 aspect ratio. Going far enough back, tires were 100 aspect ratio or even taller. I don't know when the change from 100 to 90 occurred.

 

700r15 or 750r15 pickup tires are probably more like it.

 

Edit: looks like the choices are really slim, even in 15 inch... I guess you probably have to use some 75 series tires.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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On 10/31/2018 at 10:03 AM, 48NWYKR said:

 

I late 1947 the Chrysler New Yorker, T&C's etc went to the 8.20 Super Cushion Good Year tires.

This also required a new part# rear wider rear fender and 6.00" wide wheels.

The shop manual and Factory "Data book only show the 7.50 tires.

I have this data if you really need it.

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12 hours ago, Bloo said:

 

I doubt 75 series tires are going to be what you want. They will be even wider than what you have at the same height. The old number sizes changed in 1965 from about a 90 aspect ratio to an 80 aspect ratio. Going far enough back, tires were 100 aspect ratio or even taller. I don't know when the change from 100 to 90 occurred.

 

700r15 or 750r15 pickup tires are probably more like it.

 

Edit: looks like the choices are really slim, even in 15 inch... I guess you probably have to use some 75 series tires.

Thank you! Yeah it looks slim but I have a list of 6 tire sizes that "might" work. (225/70R15 - 215/75R15) they might be a bit small. Or (235/70R15 - 225/75R15) theses should match the old 7.50 wheels. Or (255/70R15 - 235/75R15) these should match the old 8.20 wheels. I will go see a good tire guy soon and see what works best! Thanx again for the help!

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1 hour ago, c49er said:

I late 1947 the Chrysler New Yorker, T&C's etc went to the 8.20 Super Cushion Good Year tires.

This also required a new part# rear wider rear fender and 6.00" wide wheels.

The shop manual and Factory "Data book only show the 7.50 tires.

I have this data if you really need it.

Thank You! that's great info!! I don't think I will go through all of that to fit the bigger tires properly, my car seems to be the standard fit and part numbers since the wheels are rubbing! I'm just going to go with a slightly smaller wheel. If you don't mind sharing though I would like a copy of that info for future reference and I would not mind showing my Chrysler guy Ron here either. Its great to know that this stuff is still out there!

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Filters will no longer be a problem, found a guy who can get me the FRAM CH192PL filters cheap ($17.00 CAD) and local. He has only sold 1 other one in the entire BC this year so he does not keep them in stock, I got the last one. I'll stock up on a few because it's 4 to 6 weeks delivery, but at least I can get them! These guys will seal up just fine!

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OK, I know this might not meet with approval all around.... but I just air-bagged a 48 Chrysler. The inflation points will be inside the trunk. This is to help carry the load and the trailer.

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Hey Rusty, so are you taking bets on this yet?

 

"I am a bit concerned about this talk of air shocks and towing a trailer. This may be asking a lot of a car that is not a spring chicken. What exactly do you have in mind?

 

If you are thinking a trunk full of baggage and a small tent trailer or canned ham you should be ok. If you are thinking a family of 5, full trunk, roof rack loaded, towing an Airstream all bets are off. Sell the Chrysler and buy a motorhome or a Chev Suburban."

Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)
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Many Timken tapered roller bearings are available through a regular bearing house.  The part numbers have remained stable for literally 100 years.  Many bearings have industrial applications as well.  Suggest you check a major bearing house for availability BY TIMKEN PART NUMBER rather than application to your car. 

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Thank guys, yeah I can get them at a few of my local bearing places, price and delivery time vary, they are also on Ebay. I was just hoping for local and cheap so that I did not have to wait for a few weeks. Sadly if they are local, they are super expensive, If they need to bring them in at a reasonable price its 4 to 6 weeks.... Ebay is the better option as it usually gets here in about a week and the price is ok-ish.... 

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I went and got an old beat up 235/75R15 tire from the local tire shop, it's a on-off road pickup truck tire with a very aggressive tread but that is not the point, it's the size I want to test. It's not as tall as the old 8.20 15, about 2" shorter and its just about the same width, but its wide in not the same way,  because of the radically different construction between the bias-ply and radial tires this one might even fit better.  As you can see up against the door with a straight edge, the 8.20 15 is just over 9" wide and the 235/17R15 is just under... I will wait until I have it mounted on a rim before I make the final call on whether it fits or not....

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Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)
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Some of those charts are better than others, but that one at the top of the page is just plain wrong.

 

To get any size (excluding brass era pre-balloon tires and 1970s letter-size tires), start with the section width. That would be the first number in an old familiar tire size (6.00-16, 6-70-15 etc.) This is the width, at the widest point on the sidewall, in inches, on whatever rim width the designer designed it on. There is an acceptable range of rim widths, so the actual section width will vary with the rim width of the car the tire is mounted on.

 

Multiply section width by the aspect ratio (60, 70, 75, 80, etc. percent) to get the section height, or distance from the rim to the ground. This is 90 or 100 (percent) for sizes introduced before 1965, and 80 for the "replacement" sizes introduced in 1965. These post-1965 sizes generally end in a 5 instead of a 0 (7.75-14 etc.).

 

On metric tires, it is the same except the section width is in mm. On a 235/75R15 for instance, 235mm divided by 25.4 (convert to inches) gives you a section width of 9.25 inches. Multiply that by the aspect ratio 75 (9.25 x 0.75 = 6.94) gets you 6.94 inches of section height. Take the section height, multiply by 2, (6.94 x 2 = 13.88) plus the rim diameter (13.88 + 15 = 28.88) gets you a 28.88 tire diameter.

 

Metric tires without the aspect ratio marked (example: 155R13) are typically 80 or 82 percent aspect ratio.

 

This is all theoretical and only gets you close. For the real measurements you have to get on the website and look on the tire specifications page for the tires you have narrowed it down to. They will give the measurements of the actual tires, and if you are lucky, an actual revolutions per mile specification. Revs/mile varies a little bit from calculation even if you have the true measurements of the tires, due to the squish at the bottom of the tire.

 

As you can see, since old American tires sizes are 100, 90 or 80 percent aspect ratio, and 75 series is the tallest aspect ratio you find a wide variety of tires in, modern tires are going to be much wider at the same overall diameter (to get your gear ratio and your speedometer right), or much smaller overall diameter to get the width right, so the tires don't hit at full steering lock, don't hit the rear fenders, don't have to be deflated to get the back wheels on, and so on. It works out just fine on some cars, not so well on others. Good luck.

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, 48NWYKR said:

If they need to bring them in at a reasonable price its 4 to 6 weeks...

In Calif, an order for Timkens through a bearing house has never taken longer than five business days--in MY experience, but I'm sure it depends on the specific bearing number.

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2 hours ago, Grimy said:

In Calif, an order for Timkens through a bearing house has never taken longer than five business days--in MY experience, but I'm sure it depends on the specific bearing number.

That's what I told the guy! It is a shop up here called B&B bearing, its all they do,  the way he explained it is that it comes from the USA, to the  main warehouse then to the distribution centre then to the actual store then to me...... That's when I told him I would just get it myself thanks. I think they could do with some streamlining...... Anyway, I found what I needed on ebay, cheaper than getting it from Timken direct. Should be here next week sometime.

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22 hours ago, 48NWYKR said:

So I'm working on getting some wheel bearings for the old girl.... sadly I can't afford to buy from this guy.....maybe I'll start a fundraiser or win the lotto first.

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I cant figure why sellers do this, He probably has it listed on another auction or two at different prices.

I see this all the time, same seller and radical differences in 'buy it now' prices.

I guess they are just hoping that some sucker will hit on the over priced one by accident or because he is stupid and thinks he needs the best.

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3 hours ago, JACK M said:

I cant figure why sellers do this, He probably has it listed on another auction or two at different prices.

I see this all the time, same seller and radical differences in 'buy it now' prices.

Right? I don't get it either but I guess they are just hoping for that one sucker out there! I guess if you sell one at that price you are laughing all the way to the bank at someone else's expense.  

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3 hours ago, JACK M said:

 

I cant figure why sellers do this, He probably has it listed on another auction or two at different prices.

I see this all the time, same seller and radical differences in 'buy it now' prices.

I guess they are just hoping that some sucker will hit on the over priced one by accident or because he is stupid and thinks he needs the best.

It's the matching Timken # 2736 race that's the expensive part of c39 rear axle bearing replacement.

It ought to cost $6500.00 by this high $ E-bay hoser.

Cheapest race I could find was $76.00

I have bougt several of these eight cylinder rear axle bearing cones and races but never spent over $40.00 a side.

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On 11/10/2018 at 11:10 AM, c49er said:

Cheapest race I could find was $76.00

I have bougt several of these eight cylinder rear axle bearing cones and races but never spent over $40.00 a side.

I found them for $80 each and they are on the way, cones were only $18 so under $200 all in is not to bad I guess.

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I'm replacing the shock absorbers right now, I found the rear in a new Munroe shock that will work, does anyone have a crossover number or know what shock will work in the front? They are so short nothing will fit!

Thanks

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There are parts that move the upper shock mount to the chassis on the front.

Work much better that way.

I don't remember exactly where I saw this but someone should step up.

You will have to weld a mount to the chassis.

However Andy Burnbaum shows front shocks in their online catalogue.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Just now, JACK M said:

There are parts that move the upper shock mount to the chassis on the front.

Work much better that way.

I don't remember exactly where I saw this but someone should step up.

You will have to weld a mount to the chassis.

However Andy Burnbaum shows front shocks in their online catalogue.

Thanx Jack, Rusty mentioned moving the shock mounts way back on the first page in Nov 2016, back then I had no idea how deep I was going to go down this hole.... I though I would just get new shocks and call it good. Now I'm thinking that I've already gone this far I might as well move the mounts..... I'll have a look both ways and see I guess.

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I am well aware how these kind of things can get out of hand.

As for the front shocks,The original mounting is not very efficient.

I have never done it but from what I recall the chassis mount should be way more efficient.

Maybe one of the experts will have a picture or two.

It looks like you are having a lot of fun with this one and best of luck with your quest on your awareness run.

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Nobody here remembers me saying I will not take it apart any further..... right? OK good! 

 

So I was cleaning up around the rear wheel wells inside the car and decided that the rear quater windows needed to be sealed with new silicon. 4 screws, they pop out, clean up and back in with new sealant! Easy!

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So I will extend the frame out and down, then run a big rectangle tube side to side. It will be "bolt on" but you will have to remove the shackle to do it, I will be running another plate under the frame welded to the side plate.

This way I don't cut or modify the original frame in any way.

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Remember how I painted the inside of the rear fenders? Well I screwed up somewhere...... all the parts were washed and cleaned like I did with everything else, not sure if it was me, the paint, the temperature or the surface.... GREAT! I get to sand it all down and do it again...... It only bubbled up where the red oxide was painted... where I had no red oxide the black paint stuck. And that is really strange because I have painted over the red oxide before with no problems...

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Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

New rubber and carpet in the boot. I also took the spare wheel bracket out to make more space. With my luck it will be dark and raining when I get a flat tire and then the entire boot will need to be unpacked before I can get the spare out...... So, I'm going to put it elsewhere so that I don't have to do that!

 

 

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Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)
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