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1948 New Yorker 2 year road trip


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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/21/2017 at 11:01 AM, r1lark said:

Nice work. What is the status of the engine work/repair?

Still working on making my own exhaust manifold and also keeping an eye on ebay for a used one... not sure how that will pan out yet. the rest is moving along nicely.

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The car has a set of lap style seat-belts in right now, does anyone have any input about putting in proper shoulder style seat-belts? Especially in the back for the kids. Where and how would you place and secure the top part?

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If you haven't already, check out Juliano's for seat belt systems. They don't seem to have installation instructions posted on their website, but a call to them may get you the info you need. Here is a link:  http://www.julianos.com/Seat-Belts-s/96.htm

 

I Googled "installing shoulder seat belts in older cars" and came up with a number of hits. One interesting one that I looked at had some specific info:  https://www.wescoperformance.com/retrofit-seat-belts-shoulder-mt-door.html

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On 1/6/2018 at 1:00 PM, c49er said:

How did you spread the A-Arms- both upper and lower for the shaft to bushing thread clearance?

Two big ass bolts, cut grooves in the heads so they fit onto the lip of the A-Arm and then used the nuts with a spacer in between to push them apart! I'll take a pic when I'm in the garage next. One old timer told me "nah I never bothered with that" but I thought it was important to do it properly. I have not done the lower set yet. I'm going to need bigger bolts! 

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On 1/6/2018 at 1:00 PM, c49er said:

How did you spread the A-Arms- both upper and lower for the shaft to bushing thread clearance?

Two big ass bolts, cut grooves in the heads so they fit onto the lip of the A-Arm and then used the nuts with a spacer in between to push them apart! I'll take a pic when I'm in the garage next. One old timer told me "nah I never bothered with that" but I thought it was important to do it properly. I have not done the lower set yet. I'm going to need bigger bolts! 

 

Just a mock up to show what I did, not the shaft I will be installing.

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Anyone have any input on an aftermarket Air Conditioning unit to install in the old girl? Its going to be very hot where we are going... wondering where and how you would mount the compressor... not a lot of places to bolt a bracket onto that old I8...

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Go to Buick - Post War under BUICK CLUBS. Therin you will find a topic "1947 A/C". Good place to start. Get in touch with those guys. Yes , you really MUST have A/C for this trip. Been there ................     - Carl

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On 12/6/2017 at 9:16 PM, c49er said:

1949-50 that oval choke machined pad area is running front to rear...1946-48 the choke is turned sideways. There is an adapter plate that takes care of this issue. Make one or find one if you end up needing one.

You mention an adapter plate.. any chance you have a picture of one? I will need to make one. I just want to know if the heat pad at the bottom of the Auto Choke sits directly on the adaptor plate (easy to make (( heating up takes longer?))) or if it needs to sit directly on the manifold (a little harder to make) My 48 originally ran side to side, now front to back on the new manifold.

At least I was able to find one... the welding did not work as planned! Ebay to the rescue! and for a good price as well!

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Found that adapter plate on one of my cars....

Even though I'm showing a 1950 NewYorker eight with the later 1949-50 Sisson choke mounted on the adapter plate.... the 1946 to 48 different Box style choke mounts to this adapter plate exactly the same. make the adapter plate and mount your choke to it in the same position as on your old manifold.

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Exhaust Manifold Choke Plate Adapter Switch over to 1BBL mid 1947 (4).JPG

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10 hours ago, c49er said:

Found that adapter plate on one of my cars....

Perfect! Thank you! Yes that looks easy enough! The studs are broken off in the new one so I have to deal with that first! The gasket under the choke, is that the same as exhaust wrap kind of stuff? (probably was asbestos back in the day?)

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I had to look up what a Sisson choke was, since I'm not familiar with these early Chryslers. This came from a Wisconsin engine book, but the picture on the next page was identical to the one mounted on the Chrysler in C49er's pictures. Here is the writeup:5a5f839b2508e_sissonchoke.jpg.d4a557b4c3e27e20a39d7c2592db84c8.jpg

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3 hours ago, c49er said:

The 1948 and back choke units are a different style..but work and are adjusted in a similar way...

Mine look just like that, the square one! but still sits 90 deg - so I will need the plate.

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So I did find a replacement manifold... But as a backup I had some 5/16 mild steel plates cut using the original gaskets as a template to fit the cylinder head, that way you can make your own intake and or exhaust manifold if you want or need.

I have the CAD drawing and can get more cut anytime, right now I have one for myself sitting on the shelf. I also have a spare set if anyone is interested. Also the adapter plate for the bottom of the carb going onto the intake manifold in there.

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1 hour ago, Rusty_OToole said:

For the Sisson choke gasket if you can't get one you can cut one from a flathead Ford intake manifold gasket. I have done this in the past.

Thank you! I was also thinking of taking a small strip of header wrap to put under it. Something like the stuff they used on this engine exhaust. Think it will work?

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  • 2 weeks later...

No not making a bomb.... just checking the clock... think the hairspring needs some work, does not run reliably, magnet and points work just fine, might just need a clock guy to take a look.

 

Hushmat insulation on the firewall in and done! Now to mount the AC under the dash!

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On 1/24/2018 at 9:09 AM, 48NWYKR said:

Thank You! I sent him a message through ebay, will wait for his reply.

 

No Luck, he sold out of those some time back, but there are a few on ebay for around $8 so not a big deal, will order one soon.

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The clock is likely to need a clean and oil and may need other attention. The pallets, the pivots, the pivot holes... Depends on how much running it has done since built or last serviced. A clean and oil means disassembling. Oiling a clock is not just squirting some CRC into it; that will gum it up.

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I have had several of these 1946-48 Chrysler clocks not working.... open the back up.... carefully clean the points....they continue to work fine.

I did this to the one in my 48 woodie 35+ years ago... still works fine.

They are a good quality clock too.

 

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10 hours ago, JACK M said:

I sent mine out and had a new quartz movement put in.

The clock is very accurate now and can sit for weeks and be right on.

 

The trouble with doing this is that the second hand goes Tic-Tic-Tic, and in a glance suddenly its 1978, not 1948. On the upside, the clock actually works.

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21 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

The clock is likely to need a clean and oil and may need other attention. The pallets, the pivots, the pivot holes... Depends on how much running it has done since built or last serviced. A clean and oil means disassembling. Oiling a clock is not just squirting some CRC into it; that will gum it up.

Engines and big things... no problem, tiny moving bits.... no thanks, with my big dumb hands I will leave the clock to the pro's. We have a great old-timer here in Van who still works on clocks!

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12 hours ago, c49er said:

I have had several of these 1946-48 Chrysler clocks not working.... open the back up.... carefully clean the points....they continue to work fine.

I did this to the one in my 48 woodie 35+ years ago... still works fine.

They are a good quality clock too.

 

Cleaned the points already, that part works just fine, but the hairspring stops turning after a few minutes or so.... its not the electrical part that needs work, its in the springs and gears somewhere, have no fear it will run again.... keeping time is another matter!

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