48NWYKR

1948 New Yorker 2 year road trip

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Also finally got to meet Tevie and his Termite Taxi - 1947 woody. 80 year old legend around the Vancouver area and all over the states as well, he won an award at the 2014 Concours d'Lemons under the "American pile of crap" category!  

Mechanically the car is maintained really impeccably and he has well over half a million miles on the car, as for the bodywork.... well... that's another story!

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Use a governor downshift ground out button to control when the trans will upshift. Drive it like a four speed.

All my Chrysler cars are set up so I control upshift and down shifting the way i want it.

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On 8/7/2019 at 8:41 PM, c49er said:

Use a governor downshift ground out button to control when the trans will upshift. Drive it like a four speed.

All my Chrysler cars are set up so I control upshift and down shifting the way i want it.

 

I really like that idea, I must admit though that I took the gearbox out, cleaned it up, put it back in and replaced the wires running to and from with new ones, that is the extent of my knowledge about the entire system. How did you go about setting that up? 

I know there is a kick down switch on the carburetor, do you use that?

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On 8/7/2019 at 8:41 PM, c49er said:

Use a governor downshift ground out button to control when the trans will upshift. Drive it like a four speed.

All my Chrysler cars are set up so I control upshift and down shifting the way i want it.

So.... I just did another 750km round trip with Lucy (440 ish miles) and the "on demand" downshift really helps! Granted my solution to this problem is not nearly as elegant as yours and is downright redneck but it works!!! It ait stupid if it works right? Form over function and all of that? not pretty but it does the job? I can go on.......

Vancouver to Kelowna over the pass in the summer heat.... all good! 

I have done roughly 6500km (4000 miles) now and we are actually getting close to our departure date! Time for fresh oil & filters, I am going to switch to straight SAE30 and not a blend this time, I will let you know if the oil usage drops a bit.

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I use only straight 30...have for nearly 40 years on my straight 8's.

I tried 10/30  briefly...oil pressure dropped to 25 lbs hot idle...went back to 30W...... 40 lbs hot idle ...50 cruising. I like that. that's what it runs with 30W.

That DS button will do the same as what I use but maybe a little more hand operation! Glad it makes the M-5 more pleasurable to operate and drive.

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Getting closer.... new revised date of departure... January 2020.

 

West Coast mirrors installed to tow the trailer!

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Cooling is serious stuff down south so I have been told, $20 Home Depot garbage can and a few bruised knuckles later... home-made garbage can cowling...

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So the other day Lucy just starts running like poop, pop the hood and the air-filter bracket broke... go figure it's the $15 part from the local auto store, you get what you pay for I guess. I put my new found welding skills to the test and just made one myself!

Only problem is that there is one tiny part of the old bracket unaccounted for...... it's about as big as a grape seed..... most likely down the carburetor.... not sure where it ended up, or if it will cause me grief down the road...

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Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)

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Getting lots of miles in, making sure she's good to go... even using the roof rack.

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I am sure there will be a few of you who can weigh in on this next one..... the DISTRIBUTOR!!!! YAY!!! oh joy, oh joy, oh joy!!!

 

So, in my relentless quest to get the old girl running as good as can be, and because I'm far to stupid to leave well enough alone... I had a friend hook the old girl up the a proper "timing scope fancy machine thing" (technical term I'm sure).... and he duly told my my engine timing is "inconsistent" Really? well what do you mean??  she runs just fine.... right? 

Turns out that all is not well inside the "rebuilt" distributor from a major online parts store for old Chrysler's... so I start down the road of trying to rectify the problem. And that only led to more problems... allow me to explain..

 

First off there was excessive wear on the guide plate that holds the weights that advance the timing on the distributor. One had worn such a groove that the weight no longer moved but was essentially getting stuck in one spot, and when spun fast enough I guess it would be forced out rapidly instead of smoothly... hence the inconsistent timing.

 

So I fix that with a new plate (best one I could find out of an old distributor) and it runs EVEN WORSE than before....aaaaggghhhhhh!!!!

 

So more digging....

 

And here is where you smart guys can have your say...

 

Turns out, somewhere along the way someone had put a distributor off a 1949/50 onto my 1948.... why is that a problem? I'm glad you asked... turns out that the 1949/50 inline 8's ran a higher compression ratio and the distributor uses a different timing curve than everything before that.

3 degrees v 1 degree on the vacuum advance and so on and so on..... not much but enough to make a difference.

 

I am in the process of building one that would match the lower compression on my 48 right now, taking it easy and driving without the vacuum advance hooked up on the 49/50 distributor.

 

 

 

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27 minutes ago, 48NWYKR said:

I am sure there will be a few of you who can weigh in on this next one..... the DISTRIBUTOR!!!! YAY!!! oh joy, oh joy, oh joy!!!

 

So, in my relentless quest to get the old girl running as good as can be, and because I'm far to stupid to leave well enough alone... I had a friend hook the old girl up the a proper "timing scope fancy machine thing" (technical term I'm sure).... and he duly told my my engine timing is "inconsistent" Really? well what do you mean??  she runs just fine.... right? 

Turns out that all is not well inside the "rebuilt" distributor from a major online parts store for old Chrysler's... so I start down the road of trying to rectify the problem. And that only led to more problems... allow me to explain..

 

First off there was excessive wear on the guide plate that holds the weights that advance the timing on the distributor. One had worn such a groove that the weight no longer moved but was essentially getting stuck in one spot, and when spun fast enough I guess it would be forced out rapidly instead of smoothly... hence the inconsistent timing.

 

So I fix that with a new plate (best one I could find out of an old distributor) and it runs EVEN WORSE than before....aaaaggghhhhhh!!!!

 

So more digging....

 

And here is where you smart guys can have your say...

 

Turns out, somewhere along the way someone had put a distributor off a 1949/50 onto my 1948.... why is that a problem? I'm glad you asked... turns out that the 1949/50 inline 8's ran a higher compression ratio and the distributor uses a different timing curve than everything before that.

3 degrees v 1 degree on the vacuum advance and so on and so on..... not much but enough to make a difference.

 

I am in the process of building one that would match the lower compression on my 48 right now, taking it easy and driving without the vacuum advance hooked up on the 49/50 distributor.

 

 

 

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I have a dist machine and see this problem a lot. This along with the carb has a lot to do in what we call drivability. You will feel the difference. I have both of these machines for fine tuning.

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That looks completely normal to me. Is that distributor Chrysler or Autolite?

 

It can be fairly common for there to be trouble with the advance, but usually due to drag from rust or crud. A drop of oil goes down under the rotor at tune-up time. There should be an oil wick on top. I don't see it.

 

Super-accelerated wear in the mechanism can come from spark energy leaking down through the center of the rotor, so replace it if there is ever any doubt as to it's condition. (Distributor caps, on the other hand can go on almost forrever as long as they don't crack or carbon track).

 

Those slots for the pins may need to be smoothed if they have a spot that can catch. Dont over do it, and don't screw with them unless they actually catch after being cleaned up.

 

The one loose weight is a compound curve. That is how you get an actual "curve" instead of a straight line. One spring has a long loop in it (usually). The whole mechanism pulls on one spring for the first part of the curve, and goes pretty fast. Later on (somewhere around 23-26 crankshaft degrees on a lot of more modern V8 powered stuff), it contacts the other spring, and the advance rate slows way down for the rest of the curve, now that both springs are in play.

 

The length of the slots or maybe the ANGLE of the slots determines how much centrifugal advance you get.

 

Have you disassembled it and cleaned it? If you do, and you should, mark EVERYTHING. You want to keep each weight with the same pin it came from, each spring with the weight it came from and each pin in the slot it came from. Don't stretch the springs or their ends, carefully move them around and unhook them, maybe with a pick. Some or all of these things can be adjustments, depending on the design.

 

This is much older than the Chrysler distributors I am used to looking at, so there may be differences but the adjustments are as follows:

 

1) Start point of the mechanical curve: the preload on the small spring (tightness of the ends) and the drag on the pins and slots and upper shaft. On some distributors, one leg the spring is hooked over may be bendable to set this. If the weights have oilite in them, soak them in something fairly harsh (lacquer thinner or MEK), and then soak them in light oil at least overnight. Getting the curve to start consistently can be the most frustrating part. In the late 60s and 70s, Chrysler put super-thin spring steel wave washers on the pivot pins the weights move on. They help a LOT. They would probably fit yours, but you might have to part out a 70s distributor to get them.

 

2) Rate (steepness) of the first section of the mechanical curve: This is set by the spring itself. Fortunately, this is almost always close enough. If not, nothing but a different spring will help.

 

3)Rate (steepness) of the second section of the mechanical curve: This is set by the combination of both springs. If wrong, only a different second spring will fix it. Almost never wrong enough to require a different spring.

 

4) RPM at which the advance curve slows way down: How far the mechanism can move before slowing down is set by the open loop of the second spring. Bending the anchor pin can do this on some distributors, on others the loop must be shortened on the spring.

 

5) Total Mechanical Advance: This is set by the slots. Some distributors have a third pin and slot below for this, but I don't think you will see it on Chrysler. It will be set either by the LENGTH or the ANGLE of those slots. Adjustment is by substituting a different piece, or by brazing the end of the slot and filing it to the correct length.

 

Whew.... and now the vacuum.....

 

If it is one that can be disassembled then.....

 

1) Starting point (in/hg to start moving): Set by preload of the spring (shims under the spring).

 

2) Steepness of curve: Set by the spring itself (no way to change it without a different spring). Almost always close enough.

 

3) Total vacuum advance: Set by whatever washer limits total travel. This is the only thing that likely ever needs screwing with on a stock-type vehicle, although anything is possible.

 

If the can cannot be disassembled, sometimes adjustable ones are available from NAPA that have an adjuster screw up inside the vacuum port. It adjusts preload and total travel with the same screw. Sounds like a kludge, but almost always can hit factory spec. I doubt you can get this for your car but who knows?

 

On normal non-adjustable cans, the only thing you can do is limit total travel by gluing something, usually a washer, under whatever the can uses for a stop.

 

It is HIGHLY UNLIKELY that one year is going to make enough difference that the distributor wont work, high compression or not. It probably just needs work. Cleaning, oiling, maybe smoothing down the "notch" a little if it is bad enough to catch.

 

EDIT: Always remember that Crankshaft degrees are twice distributor degrees, in other words 8 distributor degrees is the same as 16 crankshaft degrees. Distributor RPM is half crankshaft RPM (400 distributor rpm = 800 crankshaft RPM). Service manuals can be EXTREMELY obtuse about this, sometimes neglecting to tell you which it is, sometimes even specifying mechanical advance one way and vacuum the other, sometimes mixing crankshaft RPM and distributor degrees and not telling you. You may need to figure it out by process of elimination.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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Countrytraveler: Nice machine! I have a Sun 404, but mine is getting really tired. It still works in a pinch.

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On 8/8/2019 at 5:41 AM, c49er said:

Use a governor downshift ground out button to control when the trans will upshift. Drive it like a four speed.

All my Chrysler cars are set up so I control upshift and down shifting the way i want it.

 

Excellent idea and I want to copy it on my 1940 NewYorker, any picture of a different installation than 48NWYKR made? Will this also ensure engine braking going downhill by shutting out the freewheeling?

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Poor thing lost its visor first day out.

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Am I missing something in that video? There was no sound. It's unfortunate that it appears the Plymouth needed a tow truck at least twice in the video. 

@48NWYKR is doing his best to avoid this situation with his wife and 2 kids in the car, a long way from home.

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17 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

Am I missing something in that video? There was no sound. It's unfortunate that it appears the Plymouth needed a tow truck at least twice in the video. 

@48NWYKR is doing his best to avoid this situation with his wife and 2 kids in the car, a long way from home.

No wife and 2 kids in the video. Plays ok at my end. This is not the Chrysler taking a trip. Its the Montana 4 doing the video. 

Edited by countrytravler (see edit history)

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I would be mortified if I broke down like that :(

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Things are wrapping up gentlemen...... The house has been rented for January 1st. So major disasters not withstanding, the end or START is near.

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5 hours ago, 48NWYKR said:

Things are wrapping up gentlemen...... The house has been rented for January 1st. So major disasters not withstanding, the end or START is near.

48, good to hear that all your planning and hard work is close to hearing fruit! I wish all of you a safe and interesting/exciting journey. We have greatly enjoyed your posts on this forum. Will we have to wait a couple years to see how the trip.went, or do you plan on posting occasional updates? (Your journey would make a great book!) 

 

Safe travels!

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