Jump to content

1948 New Yorker 2 year road trip


Recommended Posts

No slinger or Felt seal is used on the Chrysler Straight eights.

They don't leak with a good pulley hub surface and the correct seal.

The felt washer was used on the 1953 on up 23" and 25" engines if the crank pulley had the recess and prongs in it to hold the felt dust seal from rotating in the pulley.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Like I said, not familiar with this engine.

It was just a suggestion.

Yes, it is supposed to keep the oil away from the seal in the first place.

I wonder if you could put one in anyway, but as C49 says, it shouldn't leak as original. And I know he's been there.

I do hope you get it figured out.

This is a fun thread.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, 48NWYKR said:

Hey Bloo, the thermostat starts to open at 165F ( I verified that suspending it in a pot on the stove with a thermometer) the car use to run on the highway at around 175F and the fan thermocouple switch kicks on at 185F (also checked this with a pot on the stove) and kicks off at 165F. So if all works well the thermostat should stay open and the fan should stay off at speed.... only if it is getting enough air... right?

 

Yes, thats about how it should work. The thermostat might not stay open depending on temperature, but it should regulate. It's probably gonna be wide open on a hot day. As you have noticed the fan switches have some hysteresis. The thermostat and fan switch may be too close in temperature. What is the rating of the thermostat? I am guessing 180? Assuming no other "competing" problems, what happens when you drive through a town and sit at some stoplights? The fan kicks on at 185F. Once underway will it ever get cold enough (165F) to turn the fan back off? It sounds like probably not.

 

Getting enough air is always the rub. Arranging things so that air HAS to go through the radiator rather than around it probably does more good than anything else you can do. If there is not much pressure difference between the front and the back of the radiator, not much air will flow.

 

The size of the hole the radiator lives in, and/or the size of the grille opening is the limit on many cars. The delta-t (difference between the coolant temperature and the air temperature) is another hard limit. If you make the radiator thicker you reach the law of diminishing returns very quickly.

 

In a conventional brass radiator, the first row does a lot of good, the second row still works but delta-t is reduced so it cant do as much good as the first. The third row still helps but is dealing with pretty hot air coming off of the first and second row. The fourth row, if it exists, doesn't really do much at all except increase coolant capacity. More coolant capacity is more thermal mass. It can do some good by increasing the time it takes to get in trouble. On the other hand that fourth row increases resistance to airflow, and airflow is everything. You can't really transfer heat into air unless you have air to transfer the heat into. On some cars the fourth row could do more harm than good. High efficiency cores are available with more fins per inch. They can theoretically transfer more heat, but can also restrict the airflow more. It could do more harm than good... or not. It's a dance.

 

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My engine had a seal and felt combo on the first time I opened it up, I got one (now two) that looks the same from my parts guy. I just put back what I took off. The timing cover sure looks like it has the space for the felt dust seal because the opening is sized so that the dust cover protrudes past the edge. If there was no dust seal and just a standard seal I'm sure it would work just fine. This just seems right somehow. Maybe a forward thinking wrench monkey put one on way back when someone took a look in there?

20190205_121938.jpg

20190205_133748.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bloo said:

Getting enough air is always the rub

 

Yup.... stop, start, traffic, going slow - no problem... stays cool. Thermostat is a open at 165F - thought it better for the warmer climates. I wanted it to open as soon as possible. I also have a 180F should I try going to Alaska in the winter. So as I said low speed, stop start, it all works, the problem is only when speed increases on the highway. I have the same radiator/grille/bumper/hood as before so in theory the airflow should be the same as before.The only changes I made were the electric fans and the shroud. The fans work at low speed so that part is good I'm sure. In my mind the only other variable is the shroud. I really think its blocking too much air at speed, it needs to flow better. I will keep dancing with this old girl till i get it right!

 

I have though of putting louvers in the hood! Anyone know a guy up here?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke too soon..... the seal you show is the OE correct style.

I thought mentioned was the later two piece as I mentioned...typical front crank seal with a separate external felt dust seal pushed into the back of the  pulley.🙄

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 48NWYKR said:

 

I have though of putting louvers in the hood!

 

That usually doesn't work and might even make the situation worse while moving at highway speeds. It can help with vapor lock while stuck in traffic though.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Put the old carpentry skills to good use as well, I built a centre console with chargers, cup-holders and storage for the 12v radio. And for those with kids and grand-kids, you know why I put this in the back. Its not done yet, I still need to upholster the armrests and put them in but the kids will be SEPARATED in the back and have their own charging ports, cup-holders and secret storage places!

20181226_134700.jpg

20190205_160751.jpg

20190205_160805.jpg

20190205_160948.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

Been away again, but back now working on the car.

Installed airbags in the front today. Got the tire pressure right and air bags inflated. The car steers really easy and can handle speed-bumps in the alley with ease... no more bouncing and hitting the bump stops.

Just for ease of use I decided to put the inflation points on the bumper and not hidden inside where they will be hard to get to. They blend in and look like bumper grommets, hiding in plain sight so to speak. I still need a few more Zip ties to tuck the air hose out of harms way but that will be done soon. 

20190305_095919.jpg

20190305_104356.jpg

20190305_104401.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The new fan setup without the shroud seems to work in the garage for now, it will keep cool at idle and at partial throttle for a fast idle (I just wedged a block under the linkage). To be fair I have no idea what the rpms are though. Running at about half throttle and some pretty good rpms for about 30min sitting still in the garage the fans don't cool enough to turn off and stay on all the time, it gets hot.... but not dangerously hot, around 195F / 200F. I have not been able to take it out on the road for a good run on the highway yet. As soon as it happens I will let you all know how it turns out. I hope to never be in a situation where I have my foot on the gas for half an hour and not moving at all so lets hope this works.... sometimes I wonder if this AC thing is worth all the trouble, and then I come to my senses, yes, yes ,yes AC is always worth the trouble.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All the work on the front oil seal at the crank has paid off, after all the running in the garage and around the block a few times its dry as a bone down there! BIG relief! No more oil splatter all over the place.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have also put the armrests for the kids storage divider in, its starting to look like a proper road trip car now. All I need is a place to put the Scotch and Cigars for me!

 

Its old, nothing matches, its looks a bit rough and beat up in places, the paint is not perfect, but it will do the job.... kinda like me..

20190305_164750.jpg

20190305_164822.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Good to see you making progress.

I am thinking that with the air bags a convenience would be an electric air compressor built in somewhere.

This way you would have air on the road for tires and such as well.

Just a thought, I bet you cant wait to get on the road.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Airlift 1000 universal kit, enter in your spring size and off you go. The install was easy and they work really well. Naturally you will not find it under make & model... but the universal kit came with everything.  Price was not bad either.

 

 

https://www.airliftcompany.com/products/air-springs/air-lift-1000/

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/6/2019 at 8:32 AM, JACK M said:

I am thinking that with the air bags a convenience would be an electric air compressor built in somewhere.

 

I have two 12v plugs wired up, one in the front and one in the boot, I am going to buy a good 12v pump to take with. that way I can do tires as well if I need to plug a hole on the side of the road.

20190309_152503.jpg

20190309_152740.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hahaha, It ain't stupid if it works and you only need bail money if you get caught right? Personally I think the entire world needs a bit more "get'er done" and a lot less "lets initiate an independent council to investigate the findings of the appointed council that studied the findings of the engineering firm who did the mathematical calculations of the submitted drawings of the first company who proposed the initial concept...." right?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The reason they have to be certified is because some have failed and caused crashes, maybe with injury or loss of life. If the trailer is fastened to the tow bar with ball and chain and it fails..... you know what will happen. A trailer came off its car in front of me one day and hit another car.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Spinneyhill, I get it. I'm in aviation, probably one of the most regulated industries ever. Pretty much everything has to be tracked and certified, and for good reason. From the signatures in logbooks right down to the raw materials parts are made from.

It's not totally wild wild west in my garage, I have a friend by my side who is my welding coach, he also happens to be a certified structural welding inspector, he works in the Vancouver area for a large and well respected firm. He signes off on structural projects that include buildings used by companies like Costco and other large retailers. Also factor into that that we are in an earthquake zone. I would never put it on the car unless he says it will do.

 

I also have a tendency to over engineer everything I build... the thinnest wall thickness on this hitch is 1/4 inch steel, most of it is actually thicker than that.  My trailer is only 4500lbs GVWR, this hitch could probably hold 20000lbs if not more.

I like to think I'm sticking it to the man sometimes, but I would never intentionally endanger my family or anyone else's.

20190310_151447.jpg

20190310_151501.jpg

20190310_190229.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

If that is 1/4" steel for those "bat wing" gussets it sure is overkill.

You have taken care of the "lateral" forces, now consider the "vertical" and add a small gusset from the tube to the frame rail plates to help with the 'tongue load'.

 

You will never see a "Hidden Hitch" or a "Reese" this well constructed.

 

And that's my $ .03, and worth every penny.

 

Mike in Colorado

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucy is not yet licensed so I just unhooked my truck and backed the car in, just to size up the old girl. The trailer is not fully loaded with all our stuff yet and I did not hook up the load leveling/sway bars, I just wanted to see how she sits!

30 psi in the airbags (I can go to 60 if need be) and I think it sits just nicely! Granted I have yet to actually TOW the trailer.... I think I will do a few miles without the trailer first, then hook up my 10ft utility trailer and see how it goes before committing to the big one! Wish me luck I guess?!

20190313_154951.jpg

20190313_155011.jpg

20190313_155034.jpg

20190313_155101.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

If that is 1/4" steel for those "bat wing" gussets it sure is overkill.

You have taken care of the "lateral" forces, now consider the "vertical" and add a small gusset from the tube to the frame rail plates to help with the 'tongue load'.

 

You will never see a "Hidden Hitch" or a "Reese" this well constructed.

 

And that's my $ .03, and worth every penny.

 

Mike in Colorado

Thanx Mike,

 

Those bat wings on the cross bar are also braced as you can see with some pretty beefy flatbar to stop the lateral load. Then I bolted them to the frame with 3 stupid thick grade 8 bolts on each side, think about the fact that the bumper only attaches with two bolts each side. Then the actual hitch part has vertical braces on all 4 sides where it attaches to the crossbar as well as that huge 2ft triangular brace laying over the top. Naturally that has been welded BOTH sides.... This hitch, will do.......

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If you drop down to the Washington / Oregon area. There is a TV show about some folks that renovate old vintage trailers.

You might want to swing by. May not be an Airstream, but they might have something from the 40's /'50's you could trade for.

 

I had a '48 Chrysler Windsor when I got married.

Seem to remember it had 2 separate heaters up front on the side panels, and they could drive you out if you turned them up.

She was British racing green, and we painted the hood flat black to cover up some surface rust.

Brother, that thing could pull a stump, and LOTS of room in the back for a couple of newlyweds..................

 

Mike in frozen Colorado

 

PS; Don't forget to put a "turndown" on your tail pipe. Keeps the soot off your trailer. Ask me how I know. Took a whole can of Bon-Ami to get it off mine.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, FLYER15015 said:

Don't forget to put a "turndown" on your tail pipe.

Hahahahahaha yeah for sure! I actually have it in the garage, I just have to get around to putting it on! I was far to caught up in seeing how the trailer sits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used 3/8 rod and feel free to correct me but my math says the shear strength is around 58100 lbs on that rod. So it will bend, so as long as the welds hold...(insert prayer) it should stay intact... I did think about doing a cutout out of 1/4" plate and welding it on but I had the rod lying around and the trailer itself has a thinner rod (1/4") welded to its frame, I figured that if it was ok for them it should be for me....

Edited by 48NWYKR (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you considered a trip up the Coq to Merritt and back. In summer weather. It would be a good test run for you rig, simulating conditions on your voyage south. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, keithb7 said:

Have you considered a trip up the Coq to Merritt and back. In summer weather. It would be a good test run for you rig, simulating conditions on your voyage south. 

 

You bet! We are planning a few "local" runs to put the old girl through her paces before going south.  Better to be close to home if/when something goes wrong right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...