pitman

40 wt. Non Detergent oil

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Is 40 wt. oil too heavy for a 1917 Model T ?   I currently run 30 wt.--BUT I HAVE a case of 40 wt. and would like to use it up if it will work OK.  Vehicle is in Arizona--and our temps are HOT--so I kind of assume it would be OK to use----ANY OPINIONS ?

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Just an opinion, but I would say that it would be fine. I would use it in my truck.  If you are concerned about weight, then you could mix it with some lower viscosity oil.

 

Remember that any oil today would be better than the oils of the day when the car was built.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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Remember your car is splash oiled, it likes light oil. Use the 40 wt oil July to Sept. !0-30 or 10-40 is my preference. Clean the sump, blow out the oil tube and run detergent oil when that oil is gone.

TFordy2.jpg

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)

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I run 50 wt Valvoline non detergent racing oil in my 1912, 1919, and my 1926 t's and have for years with no adverse effects.

 

just sayin'

 

brasscarguy

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"I run 50 wt Valvoline non detergent racing oil in my 1912, 1919, and my 1926 t's and have for years with no adverse effects."

 

That is not what the owners manual advises!


 

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On ‎4‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 1:06 AM, JFranklin said:

"I run 50 wt Valvoline non detergent racing oil in my 1912, 1919, and my 1926 t's and have for years with no adverse effects."

 

That is not what the owners manual advises!


 

  •  

 

OMG!

 

I use 20W-50 in my T's. No problems after 30,000+ miles.

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20W-50 is a much better choice for your T it is closer when cold to Ford recomendations than straight 50 weight oil 

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Uh , oh ! But no. I think I will try to show some restraint. Perhaps I can limit myself to simple logic , and without REALLY getting into it , just mention what I use. Simple logic. Statement of fact : THE LOUSIEST OIL TODAY IS BETTER THAN THE BEST OIL 90 OR 100 YEARS AGO. Fact. So , hmmmmmmm , I guess we should just run the lousiest oil we can find. Logical , right ? Go ahead. Your car , your money. Me ? Well since you asked , thank you , I run the BEST oil I can find. Crazy ? Well , hey now. Waste of money ? Oil costs are a miniscule , insignificant percentage of the operating cost of an old car. See , I LOVE my cars. As I see it with love , the best is none too good. Cheap insurance . too. Ever accidentally overheat an engine ? The very best synthetic oil money can buy will give you a margin of protection over the cheap slop if you ever are in danger of cooking a mill. Oh yea : I currently run the relatively new (good dose of phosphorus and zinc ) Amsoil 20W/50 full synthetic in my 90+ year old cars. And if I ever find anything better , I'll jump ship. Or trade hosses. Or whatever. I am curious about the new Penzoil synthetic made from natural gas. Around this camp , it's all about love for my babies. Call me old fashioned if you like. I just prefer new fangled , state-of-the-art synthetic lubricants in my machinery. Remember what I posted about the farmers down at the feed store in Billings , MT decades ago ? The changeover to synthetic grease for lubing their heavy agricultural equipment ? Remember ? They told me that after they changed , wear at grease points ceased to be an issue. Study- up !  Safe trouble-free touring , all !   - Carl 

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